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16 June 2021
10:52 hour

Balancing my portfolio like EFT or an index fund?

Reddit Stocks

10/06/2021 - 23:26

Lets ignore my non-equities assets. I have cash and bonds and even physical gold. I am comfortable with my exposure to those asset classes. For this discussion, I'm only interested in how to allocate inside the equities portion of my portfolio. I understand we want exposure to Large, mid, and small cap stocks. I know a lot of index funds use market capitalization to determine how much a given stock will represent in their portfolio. I get the math... but, it doesn't feel right to me. It doesn't look at things like P/E ratio, price-to-book, growth, dividend yield. Is there any indexing strategies that orientated around those types of metrics? I also know you want exposure to domestic and foreign stocks. But, how do they determine the percentage? To me, it makes sense to balance according to the size of their economies (or something similar). For instance, the US should be a bigger portion of your portfolio than Spain or Switzerland regardless of where you live. Does that feel right? More interestingly, though, is the impact of monetary policies. For instance, I feel we are going to see some currencies gain value vs others (and vice versa) as a result of the past few years. Is there any way to quantify something like that as it relates to my portfolio? Finally, the part I find most complex: sector allocation! I don't even think the pros have this figured out yet. Either they focus on just one sector OR they include all the sectors! What strategies do you use to ensure your portfolio is sufficiently diversified in each sector. Or are you comfortable ignoring sectors you aren't familiar with?   submitted by   /u/one_ugly_dude [link]   [comments]


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  40. Beta-Controlled Options Portfolio (18/05/2021 - INO.com)
    Controlling portfolio beta (a measure of volatility or systemic/market risk of a portfolio compared to the market on the whole) while generating the same or superior returns can be achieved with options. A beta-controlled portfolio can be achieved via a blended approach where 50% cash is held in conjunction with long index-based equities and an […] The post Beta-Controlled Options Portfolio appeared first on INO.com Trader's Blog.
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  41. Opportunity to invest in tech sector: Axis Mutual Fund launches Axis Technology ETF (19/03/2021 - Financial Express)
    The fund is designed to track the performance of the NSE IT index which tracks the 10 largest IT companies by free-float market capitalization listed on the NSE.
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  42. Suggestions For Growing My Portfolio (22/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Morning All, At 35, I am on track with my mortgage, investing in a retirement fund through work, making small deposits in an additional IRA, have a modest but adequate cash savings, and have a growing mutual fund for my daughter's future. I would like to build my investment portfolio to include a mix of income and growth securities. I am looking for suggestions on stocks that would be ideal to invest/buy over time as a long-term income investment which yields dividends. Thank you so much! tl;dr Looking for long-term, dividend-yielding income investment stocks to buy over time for my budding portfolio.   submitted by   /u/EastCoastMountaineer [link]   [comments]
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  43. Re-balancing my portfolio to withstand higher interest rates (02/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Hey guys, As we are seeing, federal funds rates have been increasing for a few months now, and that sort of gave me a reminder that interest rates cannot remain at near 0 forever. I began restructuring my portfolio, which is currently allocated as the following: ~ 30% Utilities. (mostly green energy stocks) ~ 15% Reits. ~ 20% Technology. ~ 10% Healthcare. ~ 25% spread across various sectors. Utilities make a large portion of my portfolio because I have long perceived them as the safest, no-nonsense sector in the stock market, and I'm very risk averse. But as I realized the possibility of rising interest rates, I began doubting my portfolio. Since I'm a bit too heavy on utilities and reits, I believe that puts me in a bad position going forward. So I decided to cap those two sectors to 30% altogether and use some of the cash to invest in interest rate-friendly stocks, such as financials. I'm a long-term investor, so my questions are simple: 1. What are the implications on my portfolio if interest rates were to begin rising? How bad can I expect it to suffer? 2. how high can interest rates realistically go looking 5-10 years forward? 3. What are there more ways to make profit off rising interest rates, or at least not get demolished by it? Open for discussion, peace :)   submitted by   /u/MrOptical [link]   [comments]
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  44. Portfolio allocation balancing advice (27/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I just rebalanced my ETF portfolio and waned to ask if it makes more sense to 1) simply contribute the percentage you chose for that position and rebalance every once in a while or 2) contribute the positions that aren't weighted enough. Examples: Your portfolio target is 60% S&P 500 and 40% Total market. The S&P outperformed the market and you now have 65% S&P and 35% To. mkt. Should you in your next contribution ... 1) add 60% of it to the S&P and 40% to the Tot. Mkt? or 2) add to the Tot. mkt. till it's at 40% again? / allocate it so it stays as close to 60/40 as possible? 1) has the advantage of that you‘re still contributing to the winning positions that might continue to outperform, but you need to rebalance regularily. 2) has the advantage of sticking to the right risk tolerance for you and not having to rebalance nearly as often but doesn‘t add to winning positions. My question is, which makes the most sense? This mostly relates to portfolios that are small compared to your regular contribution (definitely for under 5y/o portfolios or if you‘re seeing massive income growth) because eventually you can‘t make a dent in the allocation and just have to rebalance regularily anyways so it makes little diference.   submitted by   /u/username-dmmit-taken [link]   [comments]
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  45. Fund Raise: Leveraging tech for wealth creation (09/05/2021 - Financial Express)
    Fintech startup Nivesh bags Rs 12 crore funding from IAN Fund; fresh funds raised to be utilised for expansion of product portfolio, technology enhancement and more
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  46. New Fund Offer: Invest as low as Rs 5000 in quality PSU, State Govt Bonds; Check risks, benefits (11/03/2021 - Financial Express)
    Edelweiss Asset Management Company Limited has announced the launch of Edelweiss NIFTY PSU Bond Plus SDL Index Fund - 2026.
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  47. Index Mutual Funds: How to invest and how they work – Explained (12/04/2021 - Financial Express)
    Index funds can be a good starting point for many first time investors and may even be a part of their long term portfolio.
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  48. My inheritance is denigrating and I'm paralyzed by fear (07/05/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    I recently inherited and IRA from my parents. When the fund, Baron BIOPX, was placed in my name last week it was valued at $167K. I wasn't comfortable with the Baron fund, as it's high risk, I'm 58yo and, it's a very significant amount of money to me. I set up an inherited IRA in my Schwab account so that I could swap it for a boring target date index fund that I'm already invested in and comfortable with. The transfer was completed today but in the meantime, the fund has lost thousands a day, the fund is now valued at $157K. This evening I went to make the swap and couldn't pull the trigger. I'm not doubting my decision, I'm doubting the timing. I'm paralyzed by fear and would appreciate your thoughts to help me work through this. Thank you.   submitted by   /u/sunluvt [link]   [comments]
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  49. Portfolio advice (01/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Hi, Another one of those portfolio advice posts... I'm a 32 year old Malaysian working in the UK. My entire life savings currently amounts to 50k GBP which at the current exchange rate is about 70k USD. About 20k are in a mutual fund. So that leaves me with 50k just 'rotting' in my savings account. My plan is to hold onto 10k as emergency fund. And invest 40k USD in this portfolio: 25% QQQ (to hold at least 5 years) 25% VOO/VT/VTI (to hold at least 5 years) 25% FAANG stocks (to hold at least 5 years) 25% individual stock picks + riskier ETFs like ARK ETFs (to play around) I have a job but it's contract based and every 3 years depending on funding I get my contract renewed. It's been 6 years, and I have a contract until 2023, however my job is not 'steady' let's just say. I think my risk tolerance is something between high and low. Appreciate any advice or opinion.   submitted by   /u/nadnurul [link]   [comments]
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