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16 June 2021
10:28 hour

Your Money: Know how dividend income is taxed

Financial Express

10/06/2021 - 21:01

Equity dividends are taxed at the hands of the recipient in certain countries and not in others


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  1. Need some help figuring out my tax situation. (24/05/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    My peak this year was 14.8k profit and now i’m only at 5.8k profit. Will I be taxed on the 14.8k profit (my peak) or the 5.8k (my current profit)? (all short term trades and there’s a whole lot of them). Also, if I am being taxed on the 14.8k, will I be able to deduct 3k because my losses this year exceed 3k from my peak performance. If anybody has any extra time, how much would I be taxed if I had to pay taxes for the 14.8k In California, and how much would I be taxed if I had to pay taxes for the 5.8k in California? (I’m not sure which one I am being taxed on yet). Thank you in advance!   submitted by   /u/cozytape42 [link]   [comments]
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  2. Taxes on stocks’ profit question (06/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I have been learning about stocks through google for the last few months but I still can’t find out exactly how selling stocks for profit are taxed. I know you get taxed more if you sell shares of stocks less than a year after buying them but, My question is will I only get taxed higher if I sell all of my shares for profit before holding them for year? Or do I get taxed for every share I sell? And my other question is do I get taxed for my profits the moment I sell them (like the usual sales tax) or do I only get taxed when I do my taxes in April?   submitted by   /u/AGamerGarcia [link]   [comments]
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  3. Is my companies ESPP really that good of a deal? (20/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I participate in my companies ESPP. Before Covid, the stock seemed to be fairly steady. It did dive during Covid, but has since recovered, which led me to nice gains (200%) on the last purchase. But usually I just sell it immediately for the 15% gain they let us purchase for 15% off. But I’m thinking, is this really that great of a deal? I put in 10% of my paycheck. So this is post tax money. I’m in about the 15% avg tax rate. So say I make $100,000 a year. (Married we make around $220,000 after deductions) I am taxed $15,000 annually. (15%) I put in $8500 of post tax money into the ESPP. ($85,000*10%). Company lets me buy at 15% discount. So I get let’s say $9,775. So I spent $8,500 to get $9,775. Nice! Then I pay short term capital gains tax of $195. So that’s a net of $9584. But I was taxed on that initial $8500. 15% is my avg bracket. So that pre tax money was $9775. So now I’m losing money. I earned $10,000 to make $9584. Why not just put this directly into my 401k where I am not taxed on it (obviously until I retire) and my $10,000 (10%) is a real $10,000 into my account? Can someone tell me if my math and logic is correct?   submitted by   /u/IJustwatch6123 [link]   [comments]
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  4. Withdrawal rate include dividend? (06/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I’m not there yet but what if I have $5 million in investments and had a withdrawal rate of 5% (read somewhere that this is a completely fine rate). Assuming dividend yield in total for my portfolio was 2%, would my withdrawal rate in total be about 7%? After taxes this would equate to $297,500 net income for the year. But I also know that dividends would be taxed differently so would be likely lower net income than what I have shown.   submitted by   /u/joeroganthumbhead [link]   [comments]
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  5. 18-year-old looking for some advice (06/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Not sure if this is the right sub for this but I'm an 18-year-old student with ~46k€ or $55k in stocks with ~$15k or 37% profit. The money is from my grandfather who has invested for me since 2003. He is not the most talented in fundamental or technical analysis, but has bought pretty safe and reliable companies. I only have bought Fortum stocks for around 5000€ with my own money. My holdings are METSB 40.6%, ELISA 27.4%, OKDBV 14.1%, FORTUM 10.9% and NOK 7%. My portfolio is currently in a regular taxable account, but I plan on opening an equity savings account where I can deposit up to 50k€ and take profit aswell as receive dividends tax free to reinvest. I'm not sure if I should just leave the portfolio alone or sell my portfolio and deposit the money into equity saving account. If I were to sell my portfolio and move the money into equity savings account, I would have to pay 30% tax on the profit so I would have less money from the start but I'm pretty sure that tax free compound interest would catch up. The good thing about it would be that every transaction would be tax free. I would have to pay taxes when I transfer the money to my bank account. I would probably buy mainly value and dividend US stocks. If I were to leave my portfolio in a regular taxable account, all the dividend income would be taxed 25.5%. I received last year around 1.5k€ in dividends after taxes. I plan on holding dividend and value stocks forever but maybe keeping some money for growth stocks to play around with. What should I do with the portfolio? Thanks in advance.   submitted by   /u/J0W1 [link]   [comments]
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  6. Long term capital gains tax question (02/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I just wanna be clear on one thing...so if your total income is 52k or less then you pay 0 in taxes for long term investments if you're single. So if you make 30k a year at work and made 50k in gains from stocks...so you would only pay capital gains taxes on 28k? Basically everything above the 52k is the only thing that gets taxed and the 30k you made from work would get taxed as normal income?   submitted by   /u/novakid703 [link]   [comments]
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  7. Dividend Hunting? (02/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I have stock in ABB because of the dividend, and I have some optimistic belief they could be positioned to grow their business if we see an increase in green energy infrastructure growth. Anyway... In doing more research about dividends I found out that all you need to do to receive it, is to buy the stock 2 or less days before the "record date" to receive the dividend. I also learned that if you trade the stock within 60 days of the record date you get taxed at your income level and... The price of the stock drops by the dividend amount the day after the record date. After holding it for 60 days, the tax rate is much lower. Seems like a reasonable strategy would be to find some trusted reliable stocks that offer an annual dividend, invest just before the record date, hold for 2 months for taxes. To give the stock time to rebound after the stock price drop from the dividend payout. Then you could rinse and repeat with next stock, or simply move your money into the next thing you want to take advantage of. Is this already a strategy? Do people in this sub do this? If so are the calendars or a cycle that people use?   submitted by   /u/TheTallandtheShort [link]   [comments]
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  8. Your Queries – Income Tax: Gains from share trading taxed under business profit, file ITR 3/4 (04/05/2021 - Financial Express)
    Separate disclosure of each source of income shall have to be made in the ITR Form, whether or not you choose to be governed by the new regime of taxation.
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  9. Income tax thresholds fixed for the next 5 years (08/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The UK economy is under intense pressure due to the effects of the pandemic. So the recent government announcement about the future income tax rate freeze should come as no surprise. [top_pitch] What are the details? During Chancellor Rishi Sunak’s 2021 Budget speech, he announced that the personal allowance and higher rate thresholds for income tax will increase by 0.5% from the beginning of the new financial year. From 6 April 2021, the rates in England and Wales will be as follows: Personal allowance Income between £0 and £12,570 will not be taxed. Basic rate tax band Income between £12,571 and £50,270 will be taxed at 20%. Higher rate tax band Income between £50,271 and £150,000 will be taxed at 40%. Additional rate tax band Income of more than £150,000 will be taxed at 45%. How are things changing in Scotland? The personal allowance threshold applies to the whole of the UK. However, the Scottish government has the right to adjust its tax thresholds as part of the region’s devolved powers. From 6 April 2021, the rates in Scotland will be as follows: Personal allowance Income between £0 and £12,570 will not be taxed. Starter rate Income between £12,571 and £14,667 will be taxed at 19%. Basic rate Income between £14,668 and £25,296 will be taxed at 20%. Intermediate rate Income between £25,297 and £43,662 will be taxed at 21%. Higher rate Income between £43,663 and £150,000 will be taxed at 41%. Top rate Income of £150,001 or more will be taxed at 46%. Crucially, the chancellor also announced that following this increase, thresholds will be frozen for the following five years until April 2026. [middle_pitch] What does this mean for the UK economy? According to the Office for Budget Responsibility, the UK government’s official independent forecaster, the change in the thresholds will mean an additional 1.3 million people will start paying income tax and one million more will become higher-rate taxpayers. This will raise an additional £8.2 billion of income for the UK Treasury when compared to the income that would have been raised when only inflation is taken into account. What does this mean for UK employees? Critics have complained that the move is a ‘stealth tax’ which will badly hit working Britons over the next five years. This is because if your wages increase over the next five years, you are likely to be drawn into a higher tax bracket and end up paying more tax. The same applies to anyone set to retire in the next five years, since 75% of any income you receive from your pension will be subject to income tax. If you are a higher rate taxpayer, you will not only be charged 40% of your wages. If you have income from any other investments, these will also be taxed at 40%. Is there anything I can do? If you have a pension, you can increase your contribution from your wages, which will reduce your income tax bill. You could also start a personal pension. You could receive tax relief from the contributions you make depending on your annual income. If you can, make use of your ISA allowance. This will protect your savings from further taxes. You can save up to £20,000 tax-free in the new tax year. Final thoughts Further information about income tax rates is available from the Budget 2021 section of the gov.uk website. Please note that tax treatment depends on the specific circumstances of the individual and may be subject to change in the future. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading Here’s how I invest in FTSE stocks like Warren Buffett 4 cheap UK shares I’d buy before the ISA deadline UK shares to buy now: here’s what I’d do with a £1,000 lump sum Who can open an ISA? Here’s what I’d do about the BP share price right now The post Income tax thresholds fixed for the next 5 years appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  10. Here’s how online gaming and E-sports are taxed in India (14/06/2021 - Financial Express)
    For online gaming to exist just as an exception to the definition of gambling under the law and yet being taxed in the same manner, seems unfair.
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  11. TDS on Dividend Income: How to get relief if you don’t have taxable income (13/04/2021 - Financial Express)
    The details of dividend income and TDS will now be available on the new format of Form 26AS to make filing of Income Tax Return (ITR) easier and to make suppression of income harder.
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  12. Brazil Personal Income Tax Rate (02/06/2021 - Trading Economics)
    The Personal Income Tax Rate in Brazil stands at 27.50 percent. Brazil personal income tax rate is progressive, ranges from 0 to 27.5 percent and is collected by the Federal Government. Besides incomes, individuals are also taxed on their worldwide earnings and assets gains. The benchmark we use refers to the Top Marginal Tax Rate for individuals. This page provides - Brazil Personal Income Tax Rate - actual values, historical data, forecast, chart, statistics, economic calendar and news.
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  13. Stock trade taxes question (02/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I'm having a little bit of trouble understanding the taxes related to sells at profit/losses. Let's say, I sell Apple shares at a profit of $1000, but I also sell shares of Microsoft at a loss of $900. Do I get taxed on the Apple shares of $1000? or am I taxed just $100? If I didn't sell Microsoft at a loss, I'm pretty sure I'm taxed on the $1000, but I was told I could cover my losses with my gains. Is this right? Sorry for the dumb question.   submitted by   /u/hashtagperky [link]   [comments]
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  14. Am I Taxed If I Only Take Out My Initial Investment? (15/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Question in the title. Example: I put $1,000 in Stock A Stock A goes up 15% I take $1,000 out of stock A I leave the gains in Stock A forever. Am I taxed doing this? Or am I just pulling out my initial investment without gain?   submitted by   /u/PersonaQs [link]   [comments]
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  15. A tax question (13/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I don't know if this is the right sub to ask this but lets say hypothetically, I recently made 10k in short term investments. I cashed out and reinvested that money in a different stock. It didn't go as planned and I lost it all. Using some of the my own money I worked to get those 10k back, which I did. So my question is, will I still be taxed for the 20k total I made or does the fact that I lost the first 10k means I won't pay taxes for what I lost?   submitted by   /u/the-groups [link]   [comments]
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  16. 10% income investment vs others (01/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    My mom makes 10% income from her dividend investments, and she lives off this money. Apparently, a big portion of this is also tax free. This seems like a great return so my question is why don’t most investors do this type of investing vs growth or value?   submitted by   /u/14MTH30n3 [link]   [comments]
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  17. Brazil Sales Tax Rate - VAT (09/02/2021 - Trading Economics)
    Sales Tax Rate in Brazil remained unchanged at 17 percent in 2021 from 17 percent in 2020. Brazil operates a multiple rate system with ICMS (Imposto de Circulação de Mercadorias e Serviços) tax levied at a state level. The standard rate of ICMS is 17 percent (18 percent in São Paulo, Minas Gerais and Paraná and 19 percent in Rio de Janeiro). Intrastate transactions are taxed between 17 and 19 percent, interstate transactions are taxed at 7 percent or 12 percent, and most imported goods are taxed at a rate between 18 percent and 25 percent. Some states offer rate reductions or later payment dates as a fiscal incentive for the installation of factories. This page provides - Brazil Sales Tax Rate - actual values, historical data, forecast, chart, statistics, economic calendar and news.
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  18. Help a newbie out (09/03/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Greetings fellow humans I am a med student so i don't have time to make money (start a business or have a job) i want something with a passive income and i have some money accumulated and i always hear from people that the worst thing to do with your money is not investing it i was wondering what to invest that money in and i did some research and found a company called PGI global that you get a passive daily income of 0.5-3% of your investment so i thought that is too good to be true So long story short should i do it or are there better places to invest my money in? Whats your advice? What do you suggest? Thank you for your time   submitted by   /u/Mstafa-K [link]   [comments]
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  19. Having trouble choosing between these two ETFs (19/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    So I am a Canadian, love ETF's but I have a little issue. I cant decide what ETF between these. ​ So Basically they are the same Canadian ETF: VSP ​ USA ETF: SCHD ​ So I would like to buy VSP because its in my currency, CAD. But SCHD has better Dividend yield. VSP has a 1.43% Div yield and SCHD has 2.82%. Should I just convert my CAD to USD and buy SCHD because of the dividend yield? This is going to be a long term investment. 15 years+ ​ (Something to mention, I have a TFSA, Tax Free Saving Account. So I dont get taxed on dividends or capital gains) ​ Dividend information is from Marketbeat,com   submitted by   /u/Galion- [link]   [comments]
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  20. Tax on broker withdrawal (15/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Lets say, I deposit 100K to my brokerage account. I use 100K to buy APPLE stock in 2 years, apple stock has doubled in valued. My portfolio is 200K If I decide to withdraw 100K, will they count that as an income? for me, I am only withdrawing the capital I put 2 years ago (pre-taxed money) ​ question 2: When I sold half my holding, how does the capital gain calculate, I am aware its a long term capital gain. Since I only sold half the holding... I get confused. ​ Thanks   submitted by   /u/Harambe1983 [link]   [comments]
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  21. What is the Best Type of Investing Accounts For Young Americans (20/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    My friend works in the US and I would like to help him open up an investing account. I have a Taxe free Saving account here in Canada, where the money i put in isnt taxed, even when I'll pull it out in 40 years. I was wondering if there is an equivalent in the states? If not, what is the best type of account he should open as a 27 year old with a 40 years investing horizon (he won't need to pull out money till his retirement). Ty for the information.   submitted by   /u/TheFriendlyTaco [link]   [comments]
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  22. If I hold a stock long term and keep adding to it does it get taxed long term or short term when I sell it? (23/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Recently I bought more shares of a company called CPSL I had originally been holding 100k shares that I bought in 2018 but I purchased another 61k in March 2021 I’m just curious if I sell will my full portfolio be taxed long term or short term or will they split it up?   submitted by   /u/Crowsale000 [link]   [comments]
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  23. How is passive income taxed? (16/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    HMRC requires everyone to report any additional income they earn. Additional income is income that is not related to employee income. If you don’t report this income, it might be perceived that you are evading tax. An example of such an income is passive income. This income is taxed, but not in the same way that employee income is taxed. Here’s what you need to know. Before we continue, it’s worth noting that tax treatment depends on an individual’s specific circumstances and may be subject to change in the future. [top_pitch] What is passive income? Passive income is money earned in ways that don’t require daily effort. You might put in some effort to get these passive income streams up and running initially, but only a little effort is needed to maintain them once they are running. Common examples of passive income include capital gains, interest, royalties, digital sales, dividends and income from rental properties. Do you have to report passive income?  Yes. Failing to report passive income is illegal. HMRC has measures in place to determine when a person is not reporting passive income. One of the most effective measures is Connect – HMRC’s analytical tool. HMRC feeds taxpayers’ data from different databases (banks, online payment providers, online sales and purchases and government departments and agencies) into Connect. The goal is to determine whether your declared income matches your lifestyle. Keep in mind that this tool works. [middle_pitch] How do I report passive income? You can report passive income by filling out a self-assessment tax return online or downloading and filling in the main SA100 tax return form. If you need to fill in more sections, maybe because of different sources of passive income or individual-specific circumstances, supplementary pages may be required. These include SA102, SA103S, SA103F, SA104S, SA104F, SA105, SA106, SA108 and SA109. With the range of different forms that may be required, it is understandable that there can be confusion when filing a tax return. However, there’s no need to worry. The gov.uk website offers guidance on how to get help with your tax return.  If this is your first time filling out a self-assessment tax return, it might be wise to get advice or guidance from an independent accountant. The steps: Determine whether you are filing your self-assessment tax return online or sending the SA100 form by post. HMRC recommends filling it online as it arguably has more benefits. If you choose to fill it out online, you have to register. Read the ‘How to fill in your tax return notes’ booklet that can be found on the gov.uk website. The notes answer all of the questions you might have and guide you through filling in the different self-assessment tax return form sections. Fill in the form. If anything doesn’t make sense to you, seek help before continuing to fill in the form. File your self-assessment tax return before the deadline. Wait for HMRC to calculate your tax. If you want to have an idea of how much tax you might pay, check the last page of the “How to fill your tax return notes” booklet. There is usually a leaflet with a rough guide to your tax bill. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading I think this unloved FTSE 100 company is one of the best stocks to buy today The NIO share price has plunged! Here’s what I’d do now 3 growth stocks I’d buy for this incredible bull market The Argo Blockchain share price is crashing. Should I buy now? These 2 FTSE 100 stocks have doubled in a year! I’d still buy them The post How is passive income taxed? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  24. Big week ahead: What to look for in the market (25/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Biden proposed to double the tax rate for the wealthy, sending FUD throughout the market last week Big week ahead: What to look for in the market - DecentraNews Under Biden’s proposal, capital gains tax could get as high as 43.4% according to Bloomberg. currently, investors pay a 23.8% top rate on long-term capital gains. Under current law, long-term capital gains are taxed favorably with respect to wages. The wealthy pay a top 37% rate on wage income, for example. The new plan would instead tax capital gains as ordinary income, at a top proposed rate of 39.6%, which would only apply to those with more than $1 million in annual income. The thing is, with all the money printing that has been going on lately, and the likelihood of increased inflation in the next months/years, people will have no choice but to put their wealth stocks and other assets. Interest rates are very low, which doesn’t leave many choices to fructify your investments. In the end, big tech will likely decide the fate of the market this week. Last October we bottomed out when big tech had earnings, January we topped when big tech had earnings. April do we top when big tech has earnings? I think it is likely. If you’re looking to play TSLA earnings, steer clear of naked options and do spreads instead.   submitted by   /u/NikoLetubeur [link]   [comments]
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  25. Tax Talk: How to calculate tax on dividend income (18/05/2021 - Financial Express)
    Dividend income from shares held as investment shall be taxable under head ‘other sources’ in the hands of recipient shareholders at applicable slab rates.
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  26. Do you pay taxes if you put gains from a trade back into a stock but lose it? (09/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I'm sorry if the title is a bit confusing. Do I get taxed on on my total gains on the end of the year, or each one individually? Like if I buy a stock, sell at the peak and then use that money to buy more stocks, but lose it all. Do I still owe taxes on that original gain?   submitted by   /u/DarkAeonX7 [link]   [comments]
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  27. JP Morgan Dividend (06/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    JP morgan recently paid a dividend of 90c per share and I have 29 units. This mean I should have received $22.185 (26.1 - 15%) (I'm an Australian investor so 15% is withheld for US tax) can someone please explain to me why I received $21.96 instead of $22.185, I have had the exact same problem with the blackrock dividend. All money is kept in my USD account so no money is transferred back. The broker I use is Selfwealth. Thanks.   submitted by   /u/VaderO66 [link]   [comments]
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  28. If I make a return of $2k through selling shares held for under a year, am I taxed 10% (lowest bracket) due to short-term capital gains tax? (29/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Sorry, I'm just a student yet to acquire a job so I have no experience filing taxes. Also, if I make the same return but through shares held over a year, I assume it's not taxed because it falls under 0% long-term capital gains? And how do taxes on dividends work? Side-note: Who the fuck is supposed to teach me about how to file taxes? My parents (non-US)? College? First job? Wait until the government nags me about it?   submitted by   /u/bamboozlwd [link]   [comments]
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  29. Dividend questions (16/03/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Hello, I am fairly new to the stock market. Please don't flame, I am trying to learn. Some of these things I googled, but the answers made me a bit confused. Because of this, I am asking for less technical explanations. So I am learning about dividends when it comes to stocks. I see that there is a dividend of, let's say, $0.205. Is this per stock that I hold within the same company? or is this a total dividend disregarding how many stocks I hold? And would this be quarterly or yearly? If it depends on the stock, what websites would be the best to find out this information? Additionally, when it comes around to tax season, I'm guessing dividends are also taxed similarly to savings account dividends. Is this right? I am not planning on selling the current stocks I have. My goal is to continue buying them and holding them until I retire. However, if the value of the stock begins to plummet and the company seems to go to poop, I will sell. Thank you in advance.   submitted by   /u/Sunniirise [link]   [comments]
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  30. Free advice to new guys (I retired at 25) (04/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Due to last year crash and me making crazy amount of money, then losing half of it and then gaining everything and a tons more back all through 2020 and 2021… I have finally retired. Currently sitting on $1.1mil (I am not showing off) and threw it in $PFXF ETF which yields about 5% yearly dividend (I know it’s too low for some of you) but I am making roughly $42000 after taxes a year as my additional income to my hobby which yields me some income, as well. I moved outside US to lower my expenses and keep making more money and keep investing. Now, the kicker. I will personally dedicate my time to you guy and help you make some money, free of charge, just ask me what you need help with and what you want to know. I will advice you on what worked for me I also have Telegram for my daily updates on stock I think have good upside and worth buying. I will also be posting info about how to invest into things outside stock market (investment properties, rentals, etc) If interested it is “RetireEasyNow”   submitted by   /u/RssnGopnik [link]   [comments]
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  31. Employees Provident Fund Tax Calculation: Contributing Rs 2.5 or 5 lakh? Here’s how you will be taxed now (06/04/2021 - Financial Express)
    Employees Provident Fund tax calculation: In the Finance Bill, 2021, the Income Tax Act has been amended to impose a tax on interest earned on contributions made to a provident fund in excess of Rs 2.5 lakhs in a financial year. 
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  32. What should I do with my T shares? (01/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I have 482 T shares at an average of about $33/share. With the recent news and upcoming dividend cut I’m not sure what I want to do with my position. What do you all think? Facts: -Just bought a home -Have consistent income and over 12 months savings aside from any investments Reasons for selling: -T is the only stock I’ve been consistently down money on -I can harvest the losses I have on T towards gains I’ve taken on other positions this year -Loss of dividend growth Reasons for keeping: -I like the direction the company has been going with HBOMax and now the WB deal -Assuming T is eventually successful I enjoy a buildup of shares at low prices from. The dividend reinvestment Welcome all thoughts. Thank you!   submitted by   /u/Didntlikedefaultname [link]   [comments]
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  33. Can you accidentally do something illegal while trading/investing with your broker account? (28/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I hope this question doesn’t get deleted on account of being a bit stupid, I admit to being a complete newbie at investing, I guess I am just trying to be cautious when starting. Basically, there’s an infinite amount of ways of losing money when investing, but can you get fined or go to jail for something you didn’t even know you did? Like exercising an action, which your broker allows you but is not legal in your country (maybe buying a stock from a business that’s not legal in your country: weed stocks etc.), or getting fined, taxed etc. without knowing. I guess what I am saying is, I don’t want do get myself fined out of my money or incriminated later along the way because I overlooked something now. Maybe paranoia is getting the best of me, i just wanted to ask here, because I can’t find anything solid on the topic on google.   submitted by   /u/p0ssidestroyer [link]   [comments]
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  34. Spreadbetting over normal trading? (31/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    For those that don't know what spreadbetting is, here's a simple run-down. You can choose a price per point. For example, suppose I like ICLN at $23. I can buy, with $1 per point. This means I'm holding 100 shares of ICLN. As for why I'm asking this question, gains aren't taxed. Losses aren't either, but that isn't an issue, as in Ireland, you can't really reclaim losses. On gains, anything over €1.3k is taxed 33%. If I bought and held, I pay about 3% interest per year. My idea is simply to buy SPY. I have the ability to leverage myself somewhat as well, and in the event of a crash, I can very easily leverage myself. My question is, is it worth it? I have access to every stock on US exchanges, plus access to most of them coins/coin Indexes, although admittedly, I'm not much of a fan. I'd like to hear some opinions on this. Avoiding 33% tax on gains seems far more enticing.   submitted by   /u/Traditional_Fee_8828 [link]   [comments]
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  35. Vetting retirement investment strategy (14/05/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    I've been thinking about how to invest in my retirement accounts and was hoping for some discussion about it. The basic strategy is to buy an average to below average dividend etf and to hold for a long period of time (10, 15, 20 yrs), reinvesting all of the dividends. The rationale is to have a reasonably stable investment, and taking advantage of dollar cost averaging by reinvesting the dividends, and ultimately resulting in having more shares which magnifies any appreciation of the etf. Given the dividends are not taxed inside the retirement account, this results in more money reinvested. The etfs I'm considering are: spyd sdy sphd schd The etfs are basically high yield, low expense ratio, with not much consideration for annual appreciation, the goal being to amass as many shares as possible before retirement. Any thoughts on this strategy and the etf picks?   submitted by   /u/broadbear [link]   [comments]
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  36. How can people possibly build any sort of passive income from dividend stocks?? (05/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I am doing DD on dividend stocks as a new investor. I am a little lost starting out. So, let's take Lowes as an example, a company that has consistently payed dividends for over 50 years. Right now their cost per share is 200.30$ Lowe's Companies pays an annual dividend of $2.40 per share, with a dividend yield of 1.20%. ... Lowe's Companies pays out 41.96% of its earnings out as a dividend. This is the information on Lowes yield % per share. So at a cost of 200.30$, you're only getting 2.40$ back every 3 months? You would have to own a very significant amount of shares to make this worth while, no? How do people make a worth while amount of money through dividend stocks when many of the reliable companies are at a very high price with typically below 2% yield? Are they finding not as stable companies with a higher yield? Do they diversify in someway that I would not understand? I'm currently researching pros and cons of Dividend stocks, and this is something that has halted me in my tracks a little.   submitted by   /u/Vrozini [link]   [comments]
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  37. Deep in the money debit spreads seem like free money to me! What am I missing? Before I do something stupid tomorrow. (01/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I spent this weekend learning about how to make some passive income doing in the money debit spreads. I don't get it. If I buy deep in the money even at a high premium then how do I lose? This is very bizarre and maybe I am missing something.   submitted by   /u/1RookieSysAdmin [link]   [comments]
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  38. Does Verizon with its 4.5% dividend have any growth potential? (15/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Hi. I have been was wrong on adding VZ to my dividend portfolio. I like it from the dividend perspective but I don’t want to buy a dying company. AT&T has bigger dividend of 7% but I don’t see any future in it. I am hoping that VZ could be a 5G play with some growth left in it in addition to its healthy dividend. Any opinions/feedback? Any other company I should be looking at instead for a potential upside along with income? Thank you!   submitted by   /u/Dowdell2008 [link]   [comments]
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  39. The Margin: People who make more money feel better about themselves, research says (05/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    Higher income was linked to more confidence and pride, and lower income to shame and sadness
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  40. Passive income investing: 3 common mistakes I’m trying to avoid (03/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Using dividend stocks as part of passive income investing is becoming increasingly popular. It’s something that I do and something I should really do more of with my cash! In a low-interest-rate environment, there’s a high opportunity cost of not making my money help make me more money. But the rush to simply find a home for my cash via dividend stocks can lead me to make unnecessary mistakes. This is something I need to be careful of. Having the right expectations for income investing One of the common mistakes I see with passive income investing is simply trying to target the highest possible income payment from a stock. Simply looking at the highest dividend per share as a monetary figure is not always wise. For example, if I buy a stock with a share price of 100p and a dividend per share of 10p, my yield is 10%. But what if the dividend per share is 10p, but the share price is actually 1,000p? Then my yield is only 1%. So just looking at the dividend per share isn’t a true reflection of the overall return for this part of my passive income investment. A better way is to look at the dividend yield, which factors in the share price to provide a percentage yield. This yield still changes every day, but gives me a better comparable number to work with compared to other dividend stocks. A second common mistake I could make would be to think that all the future dividend income is guaranteed. As much as I’d like to plan for years ahead how much passive income my stocks will definitely make me, it’s not always possible.  I do always try to find dividend stocks that historically have been paying out regular dividends. Yet unexpected company-specific events, or a wider problem (like Covid-19), can impact things. This could cause the dividend to be reduced, lowering my income in this regard.  By knowing that this can happen I can reduce the surprise here, and ensure that any projections I do take into account a margin of error. Diversifying my stocks The final mistake I’m wary of making is putting all my eggs in one basket. I might find a company with a great outlook and a strong track record of paying dividends. Even in this case, I’d be making a mistake to just buy this one stock in my portfolio for passive income investments.  Buying multiple shares helps to spread out my risk and also my overall yield. For example, I might decide to buy a slightly-high-risk stock with a generous yield of 8%. If I supplement this with a low-risk, stable stock offering a yield of 4%, then it enables me to reduce my risk. At the same time, my yields blend together, giving me a higher yield than just picking low-risk companies. The more money I’m looking to invest, the more stocks I’d look to buy to spread the risk. Overall, passive income investing isn’t a new concept, and so hopefully I can learn from these mistakes going forward. CEO’s £500,000,000 Stake on Industry’s “Uber” Revolution We think that when a company’s CEO owns 12.1% of its stock, that’s usually a very good sign. But with this opportunity it could get even better. Still only 55 years old, he sees the chance for a new “Uber-style” technology. And this is not a tiny tech startup full of empty promises. This extraordinary company is already one of the largest in its industry. Last year, revenues hit a whopping £1.132 billion. The board recently announced a 10% dividend hike. And it has been a superb Motley Fool income pick for 9 years running! But even so, we believe there could still be huge upside ahead. Clearly, this company’s founder and CEO agrees. Learn how you can grab this ‘Top Income Stock’ Report now More reading How I’d double my money investing in stocks and shares Forget the Lloyds share price. These FTSE 100 shares can make me a passive income Shares to watch in May Should I buy these FTSE 100 shares in my ISA in May? Which are the highest dividend yield stocks to buy right now? jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Passive income investing: 3 common mistakes I’m trying to avoid appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  41. How I’m investing in dividend stocks to aim for £100 a week in passive income (07/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Dividend stocks are one avenue that I like to use to generate passive income. Passive income enables me to earn money without having to put high levels of effort in. So I can continue to try to make profits from more active stock picking that require more research. When I blend the two together, my overall pot should be able to work harder for me than just doing one or the other. Passive income from dividend stocks One element that makes dividend stocks appealing for passive income is the yield. Technically I make passive income from my Cash ISA, but the amount is negligible. For companies that pay out a dividend, the income can be generous.  The way I calculate this is by looking at the dividend per share paid out relative to the price of the share. This is known as the dividend yield. The higher the yield, the more I’m squeezing the lemon.  I do need to be careful about high yields, as sometimes it can be too good to be true. A falling share price might inflate the dividend yield for a period. But the struggling company (hence the share price fall) might have to cut the dividend in the future. This would then reduce the dividend yield. So to make sure I get sustainable passive income from dividend stocks, I want to be sensible. The FTSE 100 average dividend yield sits just below 3%, which I think is still attractive. By being selective, I’d be happy targeting a yield of 5% without having a very high overall risk level. Crunching the numbers With a sustainable dividend being paid out into the future, I can now turn my mind to thinking of numbers. Let’s say that I want to make £100 a week on average in passive income from dividend stocks. It has to be an average as dividends often get paid once or twice a year. Even if I bought a dozen stocks, I’d struggle to get a payment each week! From here I just need to plug in the numbers and work backwards. I know my yield is 5% and my end goal is £100 a week (£400 a month). For a lump sum investment, I’d need to buy shares totaling £104,000. This sounds a lot to buy in one go. An alternative way could be to build up to the passive income target from dividend stocks. I could invest £1,000 a month, reaching my end goal just after seven years. From my point of view, working away at my goal for a few years to avoid a huge drain on my liquidity makes sense. So I’d prefer to do the second option. Either way, I can show that making good dividend income in a passive way is possible.  One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues Looking for new share ideas? Grab this FREE report now. Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits. From 2015-2019… Revenues increased 38.6%. Its net income went up 19.7 times! Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLED The opportunity here really is astounding. In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer? You could have the full details on this company right now. Grab your free report – while it’s online. More reading American Express Shop Small is back: how can you make the most of it? Property prices are soaring! Should I buy top UK property stocks now? Where will the Shell (RDSB) share price go in June? The 2 best dividend stocks paying 7% today 2 hot UK mining stocks to buy today jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post How I’m investing in dividend stocks to aim for £100 a week in passive income appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  42. How in the world do tax brackets work, upon cashing out after holding long term? (20/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Hello! I’m completely lost on how tax brackets work when someone is cashing out completely. Say someone has a taxable brokerage account, yet they never sell anything until the end. So annually they just get taxed on the dividends (?). Say they put in $10,000 per year, and their income is as follows, as far as years they worked: Years 2-4: $20,000/year. Years 5-18: $50,000/year Years 19-39: $76,000/year Then they are going to retire soon but get a low paying job right before, so years 40-41: $19,000/year. Then they want to cash the whole thing out their 45th year, so the last few years of having the account, no work. If they cash the whole thing out, after depositing $10,000 annually after all of those years. It would definitely be a nice sum, say they put it into ETF’s in the S and P 1500. What in the world would their taxes be on the lump sum when cashing out, that 45th year? Since their income was all over the place during all of those years. Thank you!   submitted by   /u/FlyJ776 [link]   [comments]
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  43. Is it possible for me to live off income from UK dividend stocks? (12/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Even though job satisfaction is important, a lot of us work because we get paid to do so. I need a certain amount of income in order to pay my mortgage, other bills and to fund my personal spending. As an investor, UK dividend stocks provide me with an option to generate income as well. Through the dividends that are paid out, it’s technically possible for me to live off just the income I receive from these stocks. But how can I do this, and is it really viable? Thinking through the numbers In order to be in a position whereby I can live off the income from UK dividend stocks, I need to note several things. Firstly, most companies pay a dividend once or twice a year. Some companies pay it each quarter, but not every month. So I need to factor in buying a group of stocks in order to even-out the income I receive. Ideally I’d like to receive payments monthly. The next element I need to consider is the size of the investment to generate enough income to live off. I’m going to make the assumption that I want to receive £30,000 a year gross. To keep things simple, I’m not going to go into the net figure. This is due to dividend allowances, differing rates of dividend taxation and other variables. The second assumption I’m going to make is that my portfolio of UK dividend stocks will give me an average dividend yield of 6% a year. This seems reasonable in my opinion, but can be tweaked higher or lower depending on the stocks I buy (and of course, it’s not guaranteed). As a result, I need to invest a lump sum of £500,000 in order to generate £30,000 a year in dividend income. So although it’s technically possible, I don’t have that kind of money lying around! Alternative options using UK dividend stocks This doesn’t have to be the end of the road though. There are some other ideas that I think make more sense to me.  If I want to build up to a level where the money I’m getting from UK dividend stocks equals £30,000, it can be done. In this case, I’d need to invest £1,500 a month for just over 16 years. During this period, I’ll reinvest the dividend income I receive. Then at year 17, I could look to just live off the income I get. If I invest less, it will take longer, but I could still get there in time for my retirement. The other option is that I can use UK dividend stocks to generate a passive income to help support my main income stream. Receiving dividends from shares I own doesn’t require a huge amount of work. So I could settle for investing less in dividend stocks and allocating the rest into growth stocks for capital appreciation. Whatever I choose to do, UK dividend stocks give me a lot of flexibility when trying to make passive income. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading The Novacyt share price has crashed: here’s what I’d do now Will the Royal Dutch Shell (RDSB) share price continue to climb in 2021? Will the BP share price recover in 2021? Can the Barclays (BARC) share price keep climbing? Will the TUI share price keep climbing ? jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Is it possible for me to live off income from UK dividend stocks? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  44. Investing in dividend stock (21/02/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Hi all, I have some money from liquidating RSUs that I was thinking of putting temporarily in a high dividend stock like AT&T until I find a better option to invest it in. I have an emergency fund in a savings account and a separate brokerage account mostly invested in ETFs which is much larger than the amount I plan to invest in AT&T. To me the dividend investment just seems like a better option than a savings account, and although the stock price might fluctuate, the dividend has been fairly consistent over the past few years and higher than current or near-future savings/money market rates. Is there any obvious risk that I am missing?   submitted by   /u/fitFI101 [link]   [comments]
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  45. Difference between REITs and ETFs? (11/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    So I want to invest a large chunk of my money into a stock with a high dividend yield so it can snowball overtime and have a good passive income and I constantly hear ppl debating on either to pick a REIT or ETF and I’m not 100% sure what the difference is for what I’m planning.   submitted by   /u/DilpickleOriginal [link]   [comments]
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  46. Delaware Enhanced Global Dividend and Income Fund declares $0.0586 dividend (05/04/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  47. Delaware Enhanced Global Dividend and Income Fund declares $0.0598 dividend (02/06/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  48. Delaware Enhanced Global Dividend and Income Fund declares $0.0582 dividend (02/03/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  49. Eaton Vance Tax-Advantaged Global Dividend Income Fund goes ex-dividend tomorrow (22/03/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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