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16 June 2021
10:25 hour

COVID Has Changed The World Forever

INO.com

19/05/2021 - 15:01

In 20, 50, 100 years from now, historians will be writing books and articles talking about how the Covid-19 pandemic was a major turning point globally. While it is hard to say which direction the pandemic has turned the world, there is no doubt that it has changed the world. The same way World War […] The post COVID Has Changed The World Forever appeared first on INO.com Trader's Blog.


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  20. Stocks and Shares ISA: which shares should I buy in 2021? (13/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    There’s not long to go until we have a whole new ISA allowance. That means we can invest up to £20,000 more come April, and not pay any tax when we eventually cash it in. For me, it brings the same old questions again. What types of shares are best for my Stocks and Shares ISA, and how should I invest differently this year? I generally prefer to buy FTSE 100 shares that pay dividends these days, and that might seem like a sensible ISA strategy. After all, dividend shares are less risky, aren’t they? And it should be easier for me to stash them away and ignore them for years, just taking the annual cash, shouldn’t it? Well, I own shares in Lloyds Banking Group. And the Lloyds share price is down around 35% over the past five years. Oh, and my nice safe dividends have been halted. Sure, the dividend has been paused at the behest of the regulator, and I suspect it’s likely to be reinstated relatively quickly. And I might buy some more for my 2021 Stocks and Shares ISA. But it does shows that dividend shares aren’t necessarily safer than growth shares. Growth vs income Speaking of growth shares, I also have a holding in Boohoo, which doesn’t pay any dividends. But the Boohoo share price has soared eight-fold over the same five years. Unfortunately I didn’t buy them that long ago. But, so far at least, my ISA money would have done a lot better in the growth stock that is Boohoo than in income-paying Lloyds shares. People might make assumptions about the relative risks of various types of shares. But I prefer to ignore such generalisations and focus on the individual companies. So if I’m convinced that a company is a great one and its shares are good value, I’ll rate it a buy. If not, I won’t. Some will argue that putting Stocks and Shares ISA money into dividend-paying shares is a good choice for retired investors. It can hopefully provide a steady income — at least, steadier than growth shares paying no dividends at all. But then, I have a friend who retired with a portfolio of growth shares. They pay only modest dividends now, and for years didn’t pay any at all. He gets his income by selling some shares at regular intervals. Stocks and Shares ISA strategy So for me, if the overall value of my Stocks and Shares ISA is increasing over the long term, and I can take regular income from it (via selling shares or collecting dividends), I’ll be happy. But what about 2021 specifically? The Covid-19 pandemic has changed the investing landscape dramatically, hasn’t it? Well, it hasn’t changed my long-term strategy in the slightest. I’m still guided by Warren Buffett’s exhortation to look for great companies at good prices. That might get me some better bargains while share prices are depressed. But I’ll be investing in exactly the same kind of companies that I was seeking anyway. The priority for me is to use as much of my annual Stocks and Shares ISA allowance as I can, without worrying about short-term ups and downs. One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading Marston’s shares: what will I do now about the falling share price? Is it a good time to buy shares? 1 UK share I’d buy and hold for big returns Greatland Gold shares: should I buy for my 2021 portfolio? Coronavirus: will travel insurance protect me from cancelled summer holidays? Alan Oscroft owns shares of boohoo group and Lloyds Banking Group. The Motley Fool UK has recommended boohoo group and Lloyds Banking Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Stocks and Shares ISA: which shares should I buy in 2021? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  34. The Lloyds share price: what have I learned from it? (11/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    If any share makes me wonder what lessons I’ve missed over the past 10 years, it’s Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY). And I know my biggest weakness isn’t knowing when to sell. I bought at around 90p per share, and the Lloyds share price is now hovering around 40p. So I’d clearly have been better off had I sold, but how could I have known when? I like to look forward in my investment thinking. But we have to learn from our mistakes. And, more importantly, looking back can help me decide what to do in the future. I bought Lloyds shares when the banking sector was emerging from the financial crisis, and dividends were just reappearing. Lloyds, along with what was then Royal Bank of Scotland (now NatWest Group) had come through their government bailouts. RBS was about a year behind in getting its dividend back, and I went for Lloyds — in part because I saw significantly less uncertainty. And the Lloyds share price was recovering. But roll on to 2016 and the Brexit referendum. The result shocked me. I really wasn’t expecting it to even be close. Banking shares quickly lost ground, so should I have sold then? Here’s where I definitely made a mistake. I like to follow Warren Buffett’s approach to situations like that. When something rocks one of my companies, I should step back and look at the whole thing afresh. The need to step back Thinking about it in terms of my Lloyds, the bank I knew so well, that was my error. I should have abandoned all I knew, and done my analysis from scratch again. Had I done that, would I have sold? Well, I’d have been shaken by the amount of uncertainty the Brexit result had thrown up. I held shares in a strengthening bank operating in a Europe-wide market, with London being the banking centre of the continent. That, the core of the bank’s strength, was thrown away overnight, and yet I sat on a tumbling Lloyds share price and did nothing. We didn’t know what the full fallout of that referendum result would be. We didn’t know what banking rights the UK would be left with. But we surely did know that things would never be the same again. I don’t know if I’d have sold had I approached it properly. But I did make a key mistake of not taking full account of what happened. Latest Lloyds share price crash But what about the Covid-19 pandemic? Since that took hold, the Lloyds share price has crashed by 30%. So was that another missed selling opportunity? No, I don’t think so. I certainly wouldn’t have been quick enough to sell before the initial crash — and I don’t do panic selling anyway. The Lloyds share price fell more than 30% in a couple of weeks, and slumped to a 50% loss not long after. But it’s recovering. Saying that, the banking sector has changed fundamentally again. And again, that means it’s time to re-evaluate from scratch. I think I’ve done a better job of it this time. And with dividends returning (again), I’m definitely not selling now. One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading Lloyds share price forecast: is 50p obtainable this year? The Lloyds share price has increased by almost 50%. Here’s what I’d do This is what I’d do right now about the Lloyds share price The Lloyds share price keeps falling! Should I buy the stock now? Lloyds Bank share price: back to pre-crash levels of 40p. Should I buy it now? Alan Oscroft owns shares of Lloyds Banking Group. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Lloyds Banking Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Lloyds share price: what have I learned from it? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  35. Treatment for rare diseases- an ethical imperative (17/02/2021 - Financial Express)
    World Rare Disease Day - 28th Feb: COVID-19 pandemic exposed the world to ethical imperatives of equitable access to health products.
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  36. Women rated better leaders than men by those who worked with them: Valli Arunachalam (09/06/2021 - Financial Express)
    In an exclusive chat with FE, Valli said the Covid -19 crisis had fundamentally changed the way businesses had been operating and there was a need to embrace the new normal.
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  37. : World’s first COVID-19 ‘booster trial’ will give third vaccine dose to U.K. volunteers (20/05/2021 - Market Watch)
    Thousands of volunteers will be given a third dose of COVID-19 vaccines as part of a clinical trial to examine whether a “booster” shot can protect against COVID-19 and new coronavirus disease variants.
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  38. Coronavirus Update: Global case tally for COVID climbs above 110.4 million as G-7 gathers to discuss vaccine equity (19/02/2021 - Market Watch)
    The number of confirmed cases of the coronavirus-borne illness COVID-19 climbed above 110.4 million on Friday, as the leaders of the G-7 economies were scheduled to meet and discuss the effort to get COVID vaccines to the world's poorest countries.
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  39. : Walt Disney World and Universal Studios Orlando are relaxing these COVID safety protocols — will others follow suit? (06/05/2021 - Market Watch)
    State lawmakers in Florida are set to remove local COVID-19 mandates, but theme parks are still imposing their own restrictions.
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  40. : Walt Disney World and Universal Studios Orlando are relaxing these COVID safety protocols — will others follow suit? (07/05/2021 - Market Watch)
    State lawmakers in Florida are set to remove local COVID-19 mandates, but theme parks are still imposing their own restrictions.
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  41. Shot Supply: Lack of access to Covid-19 vaccines is killing healthcare workers in poor nations (22/02/2021 - Financial Express)
    Nearly three-fourths of the Covid-19 vaccine doses administered so far have been in 10 countries that account for roughly 60% of the global GDP, as per the World Health Organization.
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  42. Covid-19: The future of work has changed (21/02/2021 - Financial Express)
    Remote work is here to stay; gig work may expand
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  43. Therese Poletti's Tech Tales: Tech’s COVID-19 boom won’t last forever, but it’s not going to end just yet (16/04/2021 - Market Watch)
    Tech giants across nearly every sector are expected to report solid earnings gains in both the coming quarter and the rest of 2021, as the pandemic accelerated nearly everything, from e-commerce to virtual work to cloud computing.
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  44. Therese Poletti's Tech Tales: Tech’s COVID-19 boom won’t last forever, but it’s not going to end just yet (16/04/2021 - Market Watch)
    Tech giants across nearly every sector are expected to report solid earnings gains in both the coming quarter and the rest of 2021, as the pandemic accelerated nearly everything, from e-commerce to virtual work to cloud computing.
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  45. The Rolls-Royce share price is rising this week. Should I buy? (18/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    For years, I’ve liked Rolls-Royce (LSE: RR), but I’ve never got around to buying. Whenever the time came for me to make an investment, Rolls never quite made the top of my list. Maybe the Rolls-Royce share price looked a bit too high at the time. Or, more usually, there’s just something else I liked better. Warren Buffett famously spoke of investing in Gillette, and the warm feeling he got every morning when he thought of the millions around the world shaving with a new blade. I’ve always had similar feelings watching airline departures and arrivals. And thinking of all those lucrative maintenance contracts bringing in the cash for Rolls-Royce. But no comparison is perfect. Chins are still being shaved around the world during Covid lockdown. But the planes aren’t flying, and the Rolls-Royce share price has suffered. We’ve seen a modest climb this week though. Since market close last Friday, Rolls-Royce shares are up 8%, as I write. But I’d never make an investment decision based solely on short-term share price moves. And the bigger picture isn’t so pretty. Feeling bullish We’re close to a year on from the start of the Covid-19 stock market crash. And, in that year, the Rolls-Royce share price has fallen 58%. But it had been slipping even before that. Over the past two years, Rolls-Royce shares are down 70%. So we’re looking at a pandemic catastrophe on top of an existing downward trend. So why am I starting to feel positive towards the stock? Well, my reason is essentially that I still see the long-term business as sound. When Rolls-Royce will get back to profit, I really can’t guess. And I still expect the rest of 2021 to be rocky for the Rolls-Royce share price. Then there’s the huge amount of debt the company’s had to take on, amounting to around £4bn now. That will have to be addressed some day. But, for now, the key question is whether Rolls will make it through the rest of this crunch year. The firm’s latest update at the end of January essentially said things are in line with expectations. Rolls expects free cash outflow of around £2bn in 2021, and I could see a few eyes watering at the prospects of that. But at the end of 2020, the company had around £9bn in liquidity — which it described as “at the upper end of the previously guided range.” Rolls-Royce share price cheap? Rolls-Royce is hoping for an upturn in the aviation business in the second half of the year. And that’s where I think the big risk lies. The Covid vaccination programme is progressing reasonably well. But there almost seems to be a new virus variant every week. And the government is still urging against booking fly-away holidays just yet. Still, with the Rolls-Royce share price around £1, or less, I really am tempted to buy. But I still don’t know whether I will. Again, it’ll depend on what other options might look more promising when the time for my next purchase comes along. One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading The Rolls-Royce share price is under £1: should I buy today? What I think Covid-19 variants mean for the Rolls-Royce share price Rolls-Royce share price: why I’d follow the Archer Aviation SPAC Rolls-Royce and Cineworld: are these UK shares too risky to buy now? The Rolls-Royce share price is down 66% this year. Here’s what I’d do now Alan Oscroft has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Rolls-Royce share price is rising this week. Should I buy? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  46. Have tech stocks been the real winners of the Covid-19 pandemic? (25/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Tech stocks like Tesla in the US and Zoom have seen a 300% rise and 270% rise respectively in their share price, vastly outpacing the growth in any of their UK counterparts like Games Workshop and IQE. Shares in Games Workshop have risen 131% and IQE’s shares have risen 164% during the Covid-19 pandemic year. It is no surprise that these tech stocks have performed well over the past year, if we consider what they have been doing. Tesla, for example, produced over 500,000 vehicles in 2020 and finished off its sixth consecutive profitable quarter. If we turn to Zoom next, it is not hard to see why this US video-conferencing company has been so successful over the past year. So many people globally have made the switch from face-to-face to online – from working, to teaching to socialising. Zoom’s revenues for 2020 reflected this demand, which rose 88% from 2019 to $622.7 million. You could say these tech stocks have been the real winners of the Covid-19 pandemic, but are they over-valued and a little over-priced to add to my portfolio? I might exhibit a little caution. Anyway, if these tech stocks are the winners, who have been the losers over the past year? There have been some howlers! Travel and leisure stocks have not fared well over the past year due to Covid-19 and several UK national lockdowns. IAG, which owns British Airways, Iberia and Vueling, saw its shares fall 66% since March 2020. In February of this year, IAG announced it had lost approximately €7bn as a result of Covid-19 due to the limits on international travel. Even while running during 2020, most flights were limited to 20% capacity. Another travel firm hit by the Covid-19 pandemic is Norwegian Cruise Line whose shares have fallen 41% over the past year. In May 2020, it faced a liquidity crisis but was subsequently bailed out by “different investment sources”. The final death knell came from the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention which stated that it doesn’t expect cruises to restart before June 2021. Overall, it would be fair to say that there have been real winners – tech stocks – and real losers over the past year depending on what sector you look at. The big question is whether the demand for the services offered by these tech companies will continue post-Covid-19? If so, I might add these techs stocks to my portfolio for the long term. As for the other stocks in the travel, leisure, hospitality and retail sectors the only way is up (right?) once lockdown measures ease. One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading Three 6%+ yielding FTSE 100 UK shares I’d pick today How I’d invest £20,000 in blue chip shares now to generate passive income Futura Medical share price: a penny stock rising fast right now Should I invest in this newly-listed AIM stock with revenue growth? What is a Lifetime ISA? Sabuhi Gard has no position in any share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any share mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Have tech stocks been the real winners of the Covid-19 pandemic? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  47. Black Death to Covid-19: A look at the history of pandemics that ravaged the planet (06/05/2021 - Financial Express)
    In the context of the current pandemic crisis (Covid 19) that has gripped the world, here are 5 of the worst pandemics and epidemics, dating from prehistoric to modern times.
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  48. Hybrid working is beneficial for employees as well as firms: Ankur Goel, MD, Poly India & Saarc (20/04/2021 - Financial Express)
    "The Covid-19 pandemic has changed our day-to-day lives and the way we live, work, play or interact with each other."
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  49. 90 days to WH COVID origins report.If they don't sandbag results decoupling is inevitable, sanctions probable and war not out of the picture (15/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Biden White House has launched an investigation into the origins of COVID-19 with the goal of delivering its conclusions within 90 days. If they don't sandbag the results and there is not conclusive evidence of natural jump from animals to humans, then for the first time the whole world would identify China as the culprit As of now globally only Republicans and some other fringe right wing movements in Europe are accusing China of deliberately letting the virus into the world Potentially when the report drops we could have 100% of Americans and 100% of the Western world posturing against China . With this scenario decoupling seems inevitable, sanctions probable and all out war is not out of the picture. Is market underestimating this risk   submitted by   /u/AjaxFC1900 [link]   [comments]
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