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20 June 2021
14:31 hour

Here’s why I’d buy shares in Primark owner ABF

The Motley Fool UK

17/05/2021 - 10:05

The ABF share price has underperformed the FTSE 100 year-to-date, but Associated British Foods reinstated its dividend and Primark stores are reopening. The post Here’s why I’d buy shares in Primark owner ABF appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.


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  1. What’s the Primark share price? (21/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    With reopening, pent-up demand is now being unleashed at fashion retailer Primark. That could lead one to think the Primark share price is worth looking into. But I won’t find a Primark share price in the financial news. Below I explain why that it is – and how I’d try to benefit from Primark’s performance. Private company The Primark share price doesn’t show up anywhere because it is not a listed company. That means its shares are not publicly traded on a stock exchange. The company is wholly owned by Associated British Foods (LSE: ABF). That explains why there is no such thing as a Primark share price published. But – if I wanted to benefit from Primark’s business performance, an investment in ABF could offer some exposure. Diversified conglomerate ABF is a well-established conglomerate. As its name suggests, its historical focus has been on food. It owns brands such as Ryvita and Ovaltine. But it is not just a food producer. For example, it has a pharma business called SPI Pharma – and Primark. ABF estimates that last year Primark lost £2bn in sales and around £650m in profits due to the pandemic. But it still managed to record a £362m adjusted operating profit in the period. Normally, Primark is an even stronger contributor to ABF. For example, in 2019, Primark accounted for £7.8bn of revenue, 49% of ABF’s total revenue. Primark’s adjusted operating profit of £913m that year was 64% of ABF’s total. So Primark has typically been the largest part of the ABF business and an outsized profit contributor. Clothing retailers can suffer from trend changes, though. That is a risk for Primark and by extension for ABF – as is the physical store focus at a time when many clothing purchases are made online. Would the ABF share price reflect the Primark share price? I think buying into ABF would offer me substantial exposure to the Primark business performance. That is because the retailer is a large part of ABF’s overall business. However, buying shares in ABF is different to the concept of investing directly in Primark. As an ABF shareholder, the value of my shares would reflect market sentiment on the whole company, not just Primark. Sometimes that conglomerate structure might help me. Last year, for example, Primark sales slumped but both revenues and profits grew in ABF’s grocery and agriculture divisions. But in other years, a strong performance by Primark could be tempered by weakness elsewhere. For example, market pricing for sugar can be volatile. That can drag down profits at ABF as it owns sugar brands like Silver Spoon and Billington’s. Cyclical food pricing is a risk for ABF shares. I’d consider ABF shares There is no Primark share price I can use to invest in the clothing chain. Buying ABF shares is not a proxy for buying Primark shares. However, I’d still consider investing in ABF. Primark is a strong brand and has a proven business model. The company’s food brands are well-known. Combining both can help take the edge off bad performance in one of the businesses. It would also give me some exposure to the Primark business. There are risks, though, including rising input costs damaging food margins, shifts in consumer tastes hurting sales, and further lockdowns dragging down Primark sales again. One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading Why I’d buy the Associated British Foods share now Why I’d buy this FTSE 100 stock now as its growth rate increases 3 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy with £3k 3 UK and US shares I’d buy for my ISA today 3 reasons to buy this FTSE 100 reopening stock now christopherruane has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Associated British Foods. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post What’s the Primark share price? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  7. If I could only buy 1 UK share, this would be it (04/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    If I could only buy one UK share for my personal share portfolio, what would I choose? I’ll start by saying that I would never actually put all of my money into one share. No company is perfect and there are always risks that may not be obvious from the outside. I believe that some diversification is essential. However, if I did want to invest my entire portfolio in one UK share, I’d want a company that had proven its worth many times. I’d also want to know that top management had a big shareholding in the business, so their interests would be aligned with mine. This leads me to a few, simple requirements. First, the company would need to have some age, preferably as a publicly listed stock. That way I could be confident that any serious problems with the business model would probably already have been revealed. Second, I’d want a company that has generated value for shareholders over long periods. I’d look for a strong share price performance and reliable dividends. Finally, I’d want to see owner-management. Ideally, the CEO or founding family would have a substantial shareholding. This would give me confidence that they’d care about protecting the value of the business and delivering sustainable growth. My perfect company? If I could only buy one stock, the UK share I’d buy today is Associated British Foods (LSE: ABF). This unusual group owns a broad range of food and grocery brands, including Twinings, Kingsmill, Patak’s, and Silver Spoon. ABF also owns the Primark fashion retail chain. Although owning such a diverse mix of businesses is not fashionable these days, this FTSE 100 stock satisfies all of my requirements: ABF has been in business since 1935 and listed on the London Stock Exchange since 1994. The Associated British Foods share price has risen by 425% over the last 20 years, and by 130% over the last 10 years. ABF’s dividend has only been cut once (last year) since 2000. The founding Weston family still control and run the business. George Weston is CEO and the Weston family control 54% of the shares. Why I’d buy this UK share today Associated British Foods is not the cheapest stock I’ll find on the UK market. It doesn’t have the highest profit margins or the highest dividend yield. And it certainly isn’t the most exciting. However, what this business does have is a long track record of generating attractive returns for its shareholders, many of whom are family members. As it happens, ABF shares now look cheaper to me than they have done for a number of years. Last year was tough for the company, which generates more than half its profits from Primark. With stores closed for much of the last 12 months, ABF’s management estimate that the group lost £3bn of sales and over £1bn of profit. Fortunately, the company’s debt-free balance sheet allowed the company to navigate the year without having to raise funds from shareholders. Furlough payments are being returned and the dividend has been reinstated. ABF shares currently trade on 17 times 2021–22 forecast earnings, with a 2% yield. I’d be happy to buy at this level for a long-term holding. CEO’s £500,000,000 Stake on Industry’s “Uber” Revolution We think that when a company’s CEO owns 12.1% of its stock, that’s usually a very good sign. But with this opportunity it could get even better. Still only 55 years old, he sees the chance for a new “Uber-style” technology. And this is not a tiny tech startup full of empty promises. This extraordinary company is already one of the largest in its industry. Last year, revenues hit a whopping £1.132 billion. The board recently announced a 10% dividend hike. And it has been a superb Motley Fool income pick for 9 years running! But even so, we believe there could still be huge upside ahead. Clearly, this company’s founder and CEO agrees. Learn how you can grab this ‘Top Income Stock’ Report now More reading What’s the Primark share price? Why I’d buy the Associated British Foods share now Why I’d buy this FTSE 100 stock now as its growth rate increases 3 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy with £3k 3 UK and US shares I’d buy for my ISA today Roland Head has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Associated British Foods. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post If I could only buy 1 UK share, this would be it appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  10. 3 high-potential FTSE 100 shares I’d buy (19/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Continued stock market buoyancy is great for investors. Especially after last year’s crash, there is nothing like seeing the value of my investments rise consistently. But it is not just the value of my portfolio that is rising. Prices of FTSE 100 stocks I would like to buy are rising as well. As a result, I find myself often fretting that I did not buy at the right time. But I am encouraged by the fact that there are still stocks out there with a lot of potential to rise. And by potential, I mean that their share price trends are not in line with their financial strength or prospects. Because of this, I think it is only a matter of time before they start rising.  Here are three such FTSE 100 stocks. #1. Associated British Foods: retail reopens When retailers reopened in April, Primark owner Associated British Foods said that the stores’ opening had gone “fantastically well”. In my view this was an encouraging statement because the retail brand is ABF’s big revenue generator. Last year was a setback because Primark stores were closed and the brand does not sell online.  Besides this, its other segments like grocery, agriculture, and ingredients did well. If they continue to perform and retail catches up too, it could be a good year ahead for ABF. But its share price has gone nowhere in the last three months. Its increase over the past year has been muted at 16% too.  #2. Tesco: online strength Sales at Tesco have slowed down recently compared to the past year. But that was to be expected, because 2020 was an atypical year. Instead, if I consider its growth from 2019, it is quite strong. Also, its online sales have shown double-digit growth. With digital sales increasingly likely to be the future, Tesco is in a good place I believe. However, its share price fell 3% on the update. In fact, it has been flat for a long time. I reckon that will change though, as the economy picks up pace and its own growth is sustained.  #3. Lloyds Bank: macro concerns for the FTSE 100 bank Banking stocks’ recovery has been held back partly because regulation has kept their dividend levels low and partly because the economy is not entirely back on its feet yet. This is evident in the Lloyds Bank share price. While its share price has pretty much doubled since the stock market rally started last November, it is still way below the levels at which it started in 2020.  But I think that can change. Lloyds’ latest results are strong, thanks to the fact that provisions for bad loans have declined. They will also be allowed to pay higher dividends in the course of time. I reckon its share price will start rising then.  The post 3 high-potential FTSE 100 shares I’d buy appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading What’s going on with the Rolls-Royce share price? 84% view crypto as ‘much riskier’ than other investments The Boohoo share price is gaining in June. Here’s why I’d buy 5 tips to help pick dividend stocks for income 3 UK shares to avoid Manika Premsingh has no position in the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Associated British Foods, Lloyds Banking Group, and Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  11. 3 reasons to buy this FTSE 100 reopening stock now (30/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    FTSE 100 conglomerate Associated British Foods (LSE: ABF) has come a long way since last year. Its share price has regained much of the ground lost in 2020. And I think there are at least three reasons that it can continue to rise further. Here they are… #1. Reopening of Primark Fast-fashion retailer Primark is a money-spinner for the company. But the retailer doesn’t sell online. So, it was obvious that the company would be hurt by store closures during lockdowns.  That is soon to be a thing of the past, though. The company expects that by April 26, 83% of its retail spaces should be open for trading. While it does estimate to have lost £1.1bn for the time that the stores were closed, I think it bodes well that when they did open, footfall was relatively strong.  #2. More than sugar While its losses were piling up in retail, Associated British Foods was stacking up gains in sugar. With the commodity bull run under way last year, sugar prices rose as well. As a result, the company expected revenue to be marginally ahead of the year before and operating profit to be significantly ahead in its previous trading update.  Importantly, I think it is interesting that this is actually a minor cannabis stock as well. British Sugar also grows weed, which it sells to GW Pharmaceuticals, that uses cannabis for medical treatments for conditions like epilepsy. As medical marijuana grows from its current nascent stage, I reckon this aspect of ABF’s business can expand. #3.  Grocery, agriculture and ingredients strong too Besides British Sugar, the FTSE 100 conglomerate’s grocery, agriculture and ingredients divisions showed growth too. Accounting for almost half of total revenue last year along with sugar, growth across these segments helped when retail dragged down overall revenue for ABF. And it expects growth to continue.  But there is a downside The one concern I have about the FTSE 100 stock is the pace of recovery. The company has already lost ground, in terms of revenue, with the closure of its retail stores. The lockdown in the UK, which is where the largest number of Primark stores are, will well and truly end only at the end of June.  It is only then that we will know how the post-lockdown economy is faring. Are consumers likely to be conservative, coming from a time of uncertainty, or are they likely to be profligate because of pent-up demand? I guess we will know soon.  The takeaway for the reopening stock I am optimistic about the outcomes for Primark, though, considering that it targets budget shoppers and going by its performance when shops were open between lockdowns. I think this FTSE 100 reopening stock can see better times ahead. It is a buy for me.  “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading 3 FTSE 100 ‘reopening’ shares I’ll be watching in April 2 FTSE 100 shares to buy right now John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Manika Premsingh has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Amazon. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Associated British Foods and recommends the following options: long January 2022 $1920 calls on Amazon and short January 2022 $1940 calls on Amazon. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post 3 reasons to buy this FTSE 100 reopening stock now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  32. Explain to me Covered Calls like I’m 5 (22/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I’m trying to lower my cost basis while earning a good side income, I understand this is doable by selling covered calls. I have a rookie understanding and I’m kindly asking for your time to educate me. I believe the process is as goes 1. Own 100 shares of a stock 2. Sell to Open: 3. Select Strike & Date (Weeklies are best for risk vs reward & choose a price you would be ok with selling) 4. Market buys & the premium is placed into your account Now my questions 1. How does your cost basis of your stock go down? Say a stock is trading $10 & I sell a CC for $15 and it reaches say $17 in a week but the owner cancels option & sells it, rather than exercising. I still keep my shares? If the price is over $15 by close and the buyer hasn’t sold, automatically the broker will exercise the contact making me sell? Is there anything I’m missing here? I don’t want to do covered puts. I don’t understand those. thank you for helping me   submitted by   /u/RunningFatKids99 [link]   [comments]
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  33. Vivid Seats sets SPAC deal with Dodgers co-owner Todd Boehly’s Horizon Acquisition Corp. (22/04/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  34. Should I buy these 3 reopening stocks (including this FTSE 100 share) in May? (04/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Demand for UK shares has risen over the past few weeks as hopes over the economic recovery have picked up. Uncertainty over global activity remains high as the Covid-19 crisis drags on. But it’s possible that investor interest in so-called reopening stocks will continue rising in the days and weeks ahead. These sort of shares stand to gain the most from retreating Covid-19 lockdowns and travel restrictions.  Should I buy these UK reopening stocks for my ISA in May? One of my FTSE 100 favourites Associated British Foods (LSE: ABF) would be an attractive UK share to buy during any usual economic recovery. But I think the FTSE 100 stock is a particularly great company to buy this time around. Why? Well I think clothing spending is likely to be particularly high following the end of Covid-19 restrictions. This bodes well for this reopening stock’s fast fashion Primark division. News of huge queues forming outside its storefronts have been plastered all over the papers recently as people have sought to glam up and refresh their wardrobes as they hit the town (and the workplace) again. Indeed, Primark enjoyed record weekly sales in England and Wales during the seven days to 12 April. I think ABF is a great pick for long-term share investors as the business seeks to expand its presence on foreign shores. But bear in mind that rising concerns over sustainability could cause profits growth to disappoint if consumers begin to turn their backs on fast fashion. Man-made threats I don’t think Gem Diamonds (LSE: GEMD) is an attractive reopening stock to buy today, however. That’s even though consumer spending is likely to receive a jolt. Buying UK mining shares requires a healthy tolerance of risk as a variety of exploration and production problems can unexpectedly occur. However, in the case of this company I’m chiefly concerned by the soaring popularity of lab-grown diamonds and how this will damage long-term profit. Today Pandora, the world’s biggest jewellery chain, said it will no longer sell mined stones on ethical and environmental concerns. It will sell artificial diamonds only, a move that could be replicated by other major chains before too long. A better UK reopening stock I’d be happier buying Wizz Air (LSE: WIZZ) shares for my Stocks and Shares ISA today. Of course this reopening stock also carries its fair share of risks today as Covid-19 infection rates remain buoyant in large parts of Europe. still, I think this UK share has a much brighter long-term future than Gem Diamonds. Firstly, the low-cost airline segment is expected to drive the recovery in the broader aviation sector. Secondly, this particular operator has significant exposure to Central and Eastern European emerging markets, regions where travel spending is growing strongly. Things are also looking up in the shorter term, too, with European Union lawmakers proposing plans to permit inbound travel under certain conditions. It’s possible that the continent’s airways could be buzzing again in a matter of weeks. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading If I could only buy 1 UK share, this would be it 3 UK reopening stocks I’d buy and look to hold for 10 years What’s the Primark share price? Why I’d buy the Associated British Foods share now Why I’d buy this FTSE 100 stock now as its growth rate increases Royston Wild has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Associated British Foods and Wizz Air Holdings. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Should I buy these 3 reopening stocks (including this FTSE 100 share) in May? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  35. Why I’d buy this FTSE 100 stock now as its growth rate increases (20/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    FTSE 100 stock Associated British Foods (LSE: ABF) has been attractive to me for some time. Last year, the valuation looked cheaper than it had for years because of the Covid crash. But the share price has made decent progress since my last article about the company in September 2020, rising from 2,067p to today’s level near 2,417p. Growth is increasing for this FTSE 100 stock I used to describe ABF as having a fast-growing clothing retail arm with its Primark business, balanced by the defensive and diversified Food business. However, today’s half-year results report has caused me to adjust my opinion. The retail arm is still growing fast between lockdowns, with plenty of ongoing potential to expand at home and abroad. But the Food business has also burst into growth with good prospects ahead. So now I’m looking at the company as a FTSE 100 stock with decent growth potential right across its operations. And City analysts expect earnings to expand by almost 60% in the trading year to September 2022. If achieved, earnings per share that year of around 138p will be higher than the 134p or so posted for 2019. Measured against that anticipated figure, the price-to-earnings multiple is just above 17. And I reckon the valuation looks fair for a business that’s just cranked up a gear with its growth rate. Perhaps higher annual growth figures will endure in the years ahead. The report covers the period to 27 February. Adjusted operating profit from food operations was up by around 30% compared to the equivalent period the prior year. The division includes businesses in the areas of grocery, sugar, agriculture and ingredients. Balancing that performance, the retail division under the Primark brand delivered a figure below prior expectations because of the recent lockdown. However, since reopening on 12 April, the stores in England and Wales have delivered “record sales”.    Short-term challenges, long-term potential But overall revenue in the first half of the year dropped by 17% compared to the prior year. And adjusted operating profit plunged 46%. Most of the pain came from the lockdown of the Primark store estate. However, the overall business coped well with cash under the circumstances. Around £860m flowed out in the period but the company usually sees a seasonal cash outflow in H1 because of the sugar business. Nonetheless, £650m was down to Primark.   Things are getting better though. And the company has reinstated shareholder dividends. It also intends to pay back to the government some of its coronavirus support money. Despite my long-term optimism, looking ahead, ABF expects a softer performance in the second half from the food division following an “exceptional” first half. And in Retail, the firm plans to open an additional nine Primark stores in the second half. Nevertheless, the directors expect retail profit in the current trading year to come in lower than last year. It’s possible growth in overall earnings could fall back to lower levels in the years ahead. And if that happens the stock could struggle to make further progress. It could even fall if the valuation contracts. And I could end up losing money on my investment. Nevertheless, I’m tempted to open a long-term position in the FTSE 100 stock now. I’d also consider adding these five to my diversified portfolio: 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50 Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic… And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains. But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times. Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down… You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm. That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away. Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! More reading 3 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy with £3k 3 UK and US shares I’d buy for my ISA today 3 reasons to buy this FTSE 100 reopening stock now 3 FTSE 100 ‘reopening’ shares I’ll be watching in April 2 FTSE 100 shares to buy right now Kevin Godbold has no position in any share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Associated British Foods. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Why I’d buy this FTSE 100 stock now as its growth rate increases appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  36. NerdWallet: 3 things to know to protect your finances if you’re new to gig work (09/02/2021 - Market Watch)
    If you don't think you're a small-business owner, think again. You could be in for a financial surprise in the form of taxes and insurance.
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  37. NerdWallet: 3 things to know to protect your finances if you’re new to gig work (09/02/2021 - Market Watch)
    If you don't think you're a small-business owner, think again. You could be in for a financial surprise in the form of taxes and insurance.
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  38. The Wall Street Conspiracy Full Movie Free Online With Permission of Owner. (15/05/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
      submitted by   /u/StockEatsBitterDiet [link]   [comments]
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  39. If I invested £100 a month in UK dividend stocks, how much could I make in 10 years? (17/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    UK dividend stocks have become more popular with investors I’ve spoken to in the past year. Perhaps they’ve seen income as more of a priority since the pandemic. Speaking for myself, I have more of a desire to receive income from stocks than outright capital appreciation. Even with £100 a month, I should be able to build an investment pot paying income via these dividend stocks. Putting £100 into dividend stocks There’s a wide variety of UK dividend stocks I can choose in which to invest my £100 a month. I’d look to put the full amount each month into one stock, and vary the stock I picked each month. If I split my £100 up into different stocks each month, the transaction costs would be too high.  Putting my funds in one dividend stock a month isn’t a bad thing anyway. This is because the dividend yield changes along with the stock price every day. The way I calculate the yield is by looking at the dividend per share in comparison to the share price. The larger the proportion this is, the higher the yield will be. For example, there were a couple of days last week when the FTSE 100 index sold off hard. If last week was a week when I was looking to invest my £100, I could have picked a stock that saw a share price fall of several percent. This would have given me a higher dividend yield. I can’t perfectly time the market, of course, but I can look to be selective in buying a UK dividend stock that’s an opportunistic buy each month. This way, I could aim for an average yield around the 5%-6% mark. Long-term rewards If I put my £100 to work each and every month, it should start to add up over time. I have a couple of options when thinking about the potential value a decade down the line.  First, I could assume that I won’t spend any of the dividends I get, and reinvest all of them back into buying more UK dividend stocks. In this case, after 10 years I’d potentially have a pot worth around £16,500. This assumes a dividend yield of 6% and that none of my shares underperform, which is always a risk. In the final year, I would have generated over £800 in dividend income alone, showing that it can add up and I can start to enjoy that benefit from the next year. Another option would be to spend the income I receive as it comes. In this case, I’ll simply have my pot of £12,000 at year 10 (again, along as my shares don’t lose any value). However, I’ll have enjoyed the income along the way. In the last year, I’d be getting paid around £650. I’m not including any potential capital appreciation in either scenario. In reality, I’d hope my investment pot would be considerably higher once I factor-in the long-term rising trend of the stock market. A risk of UK dividend stocks comes from my predictions with the numbers. Dividend yields vary over time and are backward-looking figures, based on the last dividend payment. Therefore, future payments may be less or even zero depending on how the company performs. But overall, when I consider that I’m only looking to put away £100 a month, I think the above numbers are quite impressive.  Government’s Green Dossier Exposes £400Billion Opportunity It was released November 2020, and make no mistake: It’s happening. The UK Government’s 10-point plan for a new “Green Industrial Revolution.” PriceWaterhouse Coopers believes this trend will cost £400billion… …That’s just here in Britain over the next 10 years. Worldwide, the Green Industrial Revolution could be worth TRILLIONS. It’s why I’m urging all investors to read this special presentation carefully… Access this special "Green Industrial Revolution" presentation now More reading Tesla’s share price has fallen 34%. Should I buy the stock now? UK renewable energy stocks to consider for 2021 Hargreaves Lansdown investors are buying HSBC shares. Should I buy too? Here’s why I’d buy shares in Primark owner ABF Should I buy Argo Blockchain stock after the share price crash? jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post If I invested £100 a month in UK dividend stocks, how much could I make in 10 years? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  40. The Moneyist: My parents made my sister executor of their $4 million estate, and joint owner of their bank accounts. Should I be worried? (12/04/2021 - Market Watch)
    ‘We have five other siblings who are currently unaware of this arrangement.’
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  41. [DD] Why the GME dream to have retail to fundamentally control the price is wrong. (26/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Saw a bunch of comments over at r/WSB that "WE CONTROL THE PRICE." If we say it's worth $100,000 then it is! This is misguided and I wrote up a response: You're sort of right. Yes in theory the market could collectively decide that GME is worth $1M a share and if every owner of a share banded together and could enforce this price, a cartel on GME shares would be formed. There's a problem with this though, first one is what actually could happen if the cartel succeeds but I'll get to that later. This requires a mechanism to enforce discipline on every single holder of GME. Right now traders can buy dips, pretend to be on the train then sell, rinse and repeat, dip and rip. You might ask, what if the true diamond handers NEVER sell? Then eventually the question arises, when to jump off? At some point you must take a profit right? But as soon as people believe that people are jumping off, no one wants to buy it. So no one wants to be the bagholder. Since market participants are forward looking some people will sell before this event. It's a catch 22, in order to horde shares you can't sell. But to make money you have to sell at some point. Another problem is how GME executives are likely to act when the shares become $1M or whatever you want it to be. They can issue shares because capital is basically free. They already announced this in the 10K Since January 2021, we have been evaluating whether to increase the size of the ATM (at-the-market) Program and whether to potentially sell shares of our Class A Common Stock under the increased ATM Program during the course of fiscal 2021, primarily to fund the acceleration of our future transformation initiatives and general working capital needs. Can you blame them? If the stock price becomes stupidly high, that's just free capital for bonus / comping high talent new hires, transforming the company towards e-commerce, etc. This creates new shares that requires the cartel to keep buying.   submitted by   /u/dwpunch [link]   [comments]
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  42. NerdWallet: Why does this dog need liability insurance? (12/04/2021 - Market Watch)
    Liability coverage is a must for any dog owner regardless of the pooch’s temperament. One woman was sued by a man who was startled by her 7-pound dog.
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  43. These 12 shares are the FTSE 100’s dogs since 2016. How many do you own? (22/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    These past five years haven’t been very profitable for the FTSE 100. Since February 2016, the Footsie has gained under 500 points to trade at 6,582 today. That’s a five-year return of 8%, similar to the interest paid by top savings accounts. However, adding in yearly dividends of roughly 4% more than triples the FTSE 100’s return since 2016. The FTSE 100 is a global disappointment In comparison, the US S&P 500 index has doubled over the past half-decade, rising 1o1% to close at 3,907 points last Friday. Today, the S&P 500 hovers just 1.1% below its all-time intraday high of 3,950 points, set last Tuesday. Alas, the FTSE 100 hit its record intraday high of 7,903 points on 22 May 2018. Since then, it has lost over 1,320 points, diving by a sixth (16.7%). Ouch. In short, the S&P 500 has been a star and the FTSE 100 a dog, at least since 2016. That’s good news for my family, because we sold our UK investments in 2016, after Britain voted to leave the European Union. We invested the proceeds in US and global funds and stocks, all of which have easily beaten the Footsie since then. But now I see the US stock market as highly overvalued and possibly blowing a giant bubble. Conversely, the FTSE 100 is among the cheapest it’s been in historic terms. Thus, I’m planning to invest a large chunk of capital into dirt-cheap UK stocks. The FTSE 100’s biggest dogs These are the 12 worst-performing FTSE 100 shares over the past five years. Each is a ‘fallen angel’ — a household name that has fallen on hard times. Many of these 12 company shares have been smashed by the economic downturn due to Covid-19. Here they are, in order of best to worst performer (by percentage share-price fall): Associated British Foods -26.6% NatWest Group -28.5% British Land -32.1% British American Tobacco -33.5% Lloyds Banking Group -38.8% Vodafone Group -39.2% Land Securities Group -40.4% WPP -42.7% International Consolidated Airlines Group -55.3% Rolls Royce Holdings -56.5% Imperial Brands Group -62.6% BT Group -71.7% Could these Footsie dogs become stars again? Somewhat predictably, there is a fair degree of grouping among these 12 dogs of the FTSE 100. There are two banks (NatWest and Lloyds) and two property firms (British Land and Land securities). There are two tobacco companies (BAT and Imperial Brands) and two telecoms providers (BT and Vodafone). Also, there are two companies with heavy exposure to air travel (British Airways owner ICAG and jet-engine market Rolls-Royce). ABF owns retailer Primark and sells sugar and foodstuffs worldwide. WPP is the world’s #1 advertising and marketing agency. But, in my view, each of these 12 dogs could possibly make a comeback to rise again. As a contrarian investor, I’m happy to go against the herd. Likewise, as a hunter of value shares, I love bottom-fishing for cheap FTSE 100 stocks. Hence, if you forced me to create a mini-portfolio of these’ dirty dozen’ dogs, I wouldn’t object. I might be wrong, but I see potential for company earnings to rebound strongly in a post-Covid-19 economy. However, free to choose my own stocks, I’d buy NWG, Lloyds, and BT for potential capital gains. Also, I’d buy BAT, Vodafone, and Imperial for their juicy dividend yields. Finally, if you’re a long-standing owner of any of the FTSE 100 dogs, then fingers crossed for a future recovery. Always remember that share prices don’t move in straight lines — and that today’s dogs can sometimes become tomorrow’s stars! One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading A UK share I’d buy in my ISA in March for the new bull market How I’d start investing with little money 2 FTSE stocks that I believe will continue to flourish in 2021! Would I buy IAG or Easyjet stock today? 8 tips to maintain car value ahead of part-exchanging Cliffdarcy has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Associated British Foods, British Land Co, Imperial Brands, Landsec, and Lloyds Banking Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post These 12 shares are the FTSE 100’s dogs since 2016. How many do you own? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  44. "Share borrowing" is getting paid to destroy the equity you own (21/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Why isnt this illegal? Nobody talking seems to be talking the implications for every single individual investor In the days prior to the covid investment cycle, competitors shorted the heck out of disruptive stocks like Tesla. They took on real risk to hold down their competition. After GME scared the heck out of these firms being an uncontrollabke wild card, "share borrowing" was invented. Essentially companies can short their competitors without risk of being locked into the short & becoming illiquid. All they do is call one of the offering brokerage firms and pay to borrow the shares. They can then buy out their position with these and fidelity returns the shares to the owner whenever at their leisure. Their goals accomplished both matter if they earn physical dollar count or not. In the end: Broker makes money Shorter makes money (maybe) Technical structure and value of disruptive stock gets destroyed Loaner makes a few dollars cash, Everyone is happy right? Except loaner loses future value of their shares but isnt the wiser. This is not just just slowing societal progress, its potentially murdering it. For a roadmap into the who's who of disruption all need to do is look at the lists of companies brokers are asking to borrow shares for. Industries/commodities like vertical farming and graphene. In the last few months a few of these companies recieved spikes of higher short interest than GME at peak. I'll post a link to another I saw go down in the comments. Thoughts?   submitted by   /u/Wickyor [link]   [comments]
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  45. $SRNE - opportunity? (14/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    SRNE - Sorrento Therapeutics. It is a biotechnology company with a market cap of $3.9Bln. The stock had great volatile sessions during the last months. As a lot of its peers, it has a line of COVID-related products, but not only - also has promising products on cancer and pain management. On January the stock soared with the news of a partnership with Mayo Clinic and some good data on its COVID trials. Average consensus give it a potential upturn of 100%, furthemore 22.8% of its stock is shorted. What do you think about it? Anyone here has some interest in Sorrento? Have a good Sunday ladies and gentlemen, investors from r/stocks. ​ Disclosure: Owner of 268 shares of SRNE.   submitted by   /u/treeditor [link]   [comments]
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  46. Jammu and Kashmir: Son of popular eatery owner dies 11 days after being shot by local militants (01/03/2021 - Financial Express)
    Former chief ministers Omar Abdullah and Mehbooba Mufti were among senior leaders who expressed their condolences to the family.
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  47. Entire GME saga (05/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    People talked about $GME a whole bunch in January, but I don't think you realize just what is happening in the market and how this one stock could result in the greatest transfer of wealth in human history... so, I give you this thread: Why is GameStop a game changer? It all begins with the whole bunch in January, but I don't think you realize just what is happening in the market and how this one stock could result in the greatest transfer of wealth in human history... so, I give you this thread: Why is GameStop a game-changer? pent on buying back 30$ of its stick to keep the price from dropping so much they get delisted. They went from 100 million shares to 70 million shares (20 million of which are owned by insiders and can't be freely traded). Then about 35 million of the remaining 50 million shares are owned by big investment and index funds, while the remaining 15 million shares are owned by retail investors. Average folk like you and me who are too poor to be invited by a hedge fund but put these shares in our meagre portfolios or 401k. It is important that you remember that there are only 50 million shares that can trade. Now, to stay afloat GameStop issued some bonds and the first big set of bonds (imagine as of they took out a multimillion mortgage on their entire business) scheduled to mature do so in the next week or so. Sometime last year some shit ass hedge fund bros saw $GME struggling, then got hit by the pandemic and decided it was time to short the shot out of the stock and become gazillionaires. They borrowed the stock, millions of shares of it, from the index funds and then sold it expecting the price to crater and then scooping up the cheap shares and giving them back to the people they borrowed them from. If $GME were to bankrupt, then they wouldn't even need to give back the shares or even declare capital gains. Billions in profit tax-free! So, fully expecting GameStop to default on their bonds, they shorted, and they borrowed more and they shorted, and they borrowed some more and they shorted... but who was buying the shares? Regular dorks like us. Retail investors, were buying and hoarding the stock. By January the shares on GameStop had been shorted something like 140%... how does that happen? Well, once the stock is borrowed and shorted, and someone like me buys the shares, I would get counted as an owner and the fund from which the shares were borrowed gets counted as an owner too. Then, the stock sits in my brokerage account and my broker lends the stock to a hedge fund and shorts it again. So someone else bought the shares and they're counted as an owner, I'm counted as an owner, and the index fund is counted as an owner... before long 10/this had gotten out of control and the index funds wanted their shares back, but the price of the stock had risen above what the HFs had shorted it for, and the retail owners refused to sell. This is called a "short squeeze" and the result was the stock going from $2.57 to $480 in a year. It wasn't that $GME generated business that warranted such a high price, but the fact that the HFs got out over their skis and their greed hoisted their Petar. 11 hedge funds went bankrupt and the biggest, Melvin Capital was down 53%! The stock fell and bottomed out around $40 a share, but it wasn't done, more HFs loans were due and they had had to buy the stock and give it back to their lenders, so the price spiked again last week to around $200. This caused a new problem: options markets. Options markets are weird to the average person. Basically, people have the stock in 100 share blocks and sell "options to buy" known as "call options" where you purchase the right to buy the stock at a set price of the market for that stock goes up. 1For example: an options writer makes an "out of the money" (OTM) option for $GME back at Christmas for $80 a share that has a date of February 26th. This means if someone buys that option at like $1 a share for 100 shares and by February 26th the stock is more than $80, they can exercise that option and get all $100 shares for below market value at $80 a share. The options writer MUST sell them those shares OR ELSE. Well, when a stock is trading at $20 and the option's writer sells an $80 option, they don't actually own the shares because who 16/ Expects a shitty stock like $GME to shoot up 300+%? This is called a "naked option" and the options trader now has to find the shares to fulfil the order. The problem is that he only got paid $81 per share and last Friday shares were $100 each. So the options guys are haemorrhaging money because the stock went from $40 to $100 in three days and all the contracts due on 2/26 from $100 on down were now "in the money" (ITM). On top of this, a whole bunch of short-sellers were doing naked shorts, meaning they were selling stock they didn't have on the promise that in two days they will find the shares and deliver them, betting that the price would drop and they could find cheap shares to fulfil their order. As it stands, between the shorts, naked shorts, and naked call options, the rich douchebags have to find something in the neighbourhood of 200 million to 500 million shares to fill their orders. There are only 50 million physical shares in existence, all now in the hands of retail investors who are refusing to sell... and millions of more naked shares from call options will be ITM come tomorrow afternoon if the price remains above $100 Every evening after the market closes the brokerages do some accounting with the clearinghouses. They even their books see that x-number of shares moved here and y-dollars moved there and sometimes they find that 3 million shares are supposed to move from a hedge fund account with brokerage A to accounts with brokerage B, but the HF account with brokerage A only has 2 million physical shares to give. This is known as a "failure to deliver" (FTD). So, brokerage A looks at their other Accounts and sees that there are another million shares owned by their customers and loans these 1 mil shares to the hedge fund to give to brokerage B, and A's hedge fund account has 21 days to find 1 million more shares OR ELSE. This or else is big because if 21 days pass and the hedge fund hasn't found the shares, brokerage A is required to liquidate the hedge fund's assets and buy the stock at any price to fulfil their obligation. If the retail investors demand $1 million a share, then brokerage A has to pay $1 million a share and liquidate $1 million of the hedge fund's assets to pay for it. The same goes for the options writers. If they go 21 days from when they sold the shares and don't deliver, they now have to liquidate assets and pay any price for these shares... and they all have to do this hundreds of millions of times because remember, there are 200 to 500 million naked/synthetics shares out there but only 50 million physical shares. They don't know if they will get a physical share or a synthetic one when someone offers to sell and they have to keep buying until all orders are filled. Hedge funds and entire options markets will go bankrupt. If there are 500 million shares bought at $100,000 each, then these groups have to come up with $50 trillion. No one has that kind of money. So, they will be liquidated pit of existence, and then the instances companies and the clearinghouse themselves will have to start buying shares with their $63 trillion insurance fund (which is basically just the federal reserve printing money). The entire global economy is only $87.8 trillion... and for a brief few days, $GME has the power to not only be a $7 trillion company making Ryan Cohen possibly the world's first trillionaire but to essentially see almost all the cash on earth go to fulfilling a whole bunch of shitty bets a bunch of douchebros made filter into the hands of poor schlubs from Reddit who called their bluff. Something like 63 multi-billion hedge funds could face annihilation.   submitted by   /u/shiv_saransh [link]   [comments]
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  48. : British Airways owner IAG dives to record €7.4 billion loss (26/02/2021 - Market Watch)
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  49. Agra Hospital which was sealed after owner’s oxygen supply cut claim gets clean chit (19/06/2021 - Financial Express)
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