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03 August 2021
11:55 hour

I need a genius to explain to me how did A PARTICULAR STOCK move from $44 to nearly $200 in a day. How much money was needed?

Reddit Stocks

25/02/2021 - 03:13

What is the formula? How do I figure out how much money was pumped in? I'm wondering wtf happened with A PARTICULAR STOCK today. Like. I need to know. I've seen penny stocks jump that high but never a stock that's above $40 move like that. That was insane. I am really hoping it was retail investors who were the underdogs and finally stuck it to the man and not some conspiracy to fuck with us. I have no stock in A PARTICULAR STOCK because I'm a paper handed bitch who gave up hope and made some of her money back in ANOTHER FUCKING STOCK when it went from $30 to $50, and then tanked, and that's another one I'm like... iffy about. Do you think price manipulation from big business might be happening?   submitted by   /u/horrorhoney [link]   [comments]


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  32. Can someone explain how to make money buying covered puts (instead of just breaking even)? (06/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I understand the general idea of a put: I&#39;m buying a contract that gives me the option to sell stock at a certain price by a certain date. What I can&#39;t get my head around is how you&#39;d make money buying a put (well, a covered put, anyway; I understand how you can make a lot of money shorting, even though it&#39;s risky). Let&#39;s use GME as an example. Right now, the stock trading at $163. A $155 GME put has a premium of $0.83, so a single put contract costs $83 total. But in order to cover that put, I need to start with 100 shares of GME, valued at $16,300. Let&#39;s say I buy the contract for $83, and the stock price drops to $150. I have the option of selling my shares at $155, but why would I ever exercise that? I&#39;d lose $8 a share from where I started, to say nothing of the $83 I&#39;m down for the contract itself. Do I just sell the put contract to someone else to make back the premium? Because even if I did sell the contract and keep my shares, I&#39;ve now lost $13 a share when the price fell from $163 to $150. Would selling the contract actually break me even, let alone make me money? Are puts just supposed to be a tool for stopping your losses, instead of making money? Are you even ever supposed to exercise puts? Any help would be appreciated! &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/Panx [link] &#32; [comments]
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  33. Can some one explain to me why US wont be hit the worst inflation ever in history? (10/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    So i been looking at the M1 stocks and the money press, and it seems like US printing press have been running overtime since 2020. M1 Money Stock (DISCONTINUED) (M1) | FRED | St. Louis Fed (stlouisfed.org) If this is correct from FRED, then US economy is destroyed? Why dont they have hyperinflation? The printer have been going brrrrrr since 2020, and 16000 of the 20000 billion dollars in circulations have been printed the last year? &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/sovereign_citizen5 [link] &#32; [comments]
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  34. I’ll try to explain as best I can why these hedge funds are getting margin called and how it might be just the beginning. (28/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Alright, I’m going to try to explain what I think is going to happen after SLR comes into effect. It’s already beginning. So, big banks and hedge funds have been having the biggest bash of their lives because the fed got rid of the SLR for banks and treasuries. Simply put, this allowed banks to have much more liquidity and free flowing money. When this ends on the 31st, the big banks will be required to have north of 6%+ in asset protection for any losses incurred. All this means is that they are going to have to start being frugal with their money again. All this easy money flowing through all these huge firms this past year will basically be recalled by the big banks. Hence, the margin call and the sell of Viacom, etc. They had to liquidate their positions because the banks are going to need to start collecting that free flowing money back to meet the SLR once again. From what I read, this actually isn’t as bad as it sounds. A lot of articles pointed that it will be a slow move from no SLR to working its way back to SLR that existed before coronavirus hit. BUT, regardless many, many firms and institutions that have been riding in this easy money will need to pay the piper. What does this mean? Possibly large sell offs in blue chip stocks, huge net losses in shorted stocks where they will have to cover the shares back and then pay the piper. But I think the biggest thing is that interest rates, such as the borrow fee rates for shorting stocks could skyrocket. Upwards of 100% or more which will cause MASSIVE short squeezes across the board. This is what he’s talking about. Shorting is a risk with infinite downside and lenders will not be so keen to let these institutions and firms shorting stock with little risk to them. Hope that helps clarify things. So if a borrow fee goes up to 50-100% + for any stocks that are heavily shorted it will instantly cause them to cover their positions in turn causing MOASS across the boards for many, many stocks. So to sum up, selling off of institutional investments driving market prices down in some stocks. Potential covering of positions in shorted stocks, cause let’s face it. All these shorts deserve to burn in hell and I hope they get their just deserves! &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/Trickre1678 [link] &#32; [comments]
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  35. Why shorting Robinhood on IPO will not get you squeezed by big money (07/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    So people have talked about shorting Robinhood but are afraid of big money getting revenge for GME by pumping Robinhood up and margin calling all the retail shorters Here are 2 reasons why you shouldn&#39;t be afraid of that if you decide to short Robinhood: roBinhood lost lots of cUstomers recentlY robinhood needed billions in CAsh to fix Liquidity issues to prevent LosseS If the above happens then I believe it should have a slingshot effect against any big money that might want to balloon Robinhood up So thus, I believe people should short sell Robinhood, buy puts on Robinhood, go short on Robinhood, Robinhood price target $0, Robinhood bad stock, I don&#39;t like Robinhood stock Feel free to crosspost to other investing subs I got banned from the big one and the replacement big one because I got banned for 69 days by the mods that thought my memes were bad &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/YsDivers [link] &#32; [comments]
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  36. Can someone explain Private Placements to me? (12/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I mean, I understand what happens. It’s a deal made off the market and it’s more beneficial for the company, more direct. But I’m talking in terms of price. Do PP’s typically move a stock in the positive direction? Or somehow the other way? Say a stock is trading at .43 cents. The stock opens the next day dropped off 30% down to .30 range. Then, shortly after the drop they announce a 25 Million Dollar PP @.30 with Warrants to buy more at .40. Could that drop somehow have been related to the deal being made at .30? Does the company issues new shares in these situations meaning they aren’t bought right off the open market? And thus won’t affect the price directly? Like, for instance. My brain wants to think in the mentioned situation that: ‘Ok, the stock was trading at .43, they had a lunch date or whatever and decided .30 would be where the deal was made. So they drove the price down from .43 to .30 to pick up his friends and his 25 Million Dollars in stock at that set price and then once they’re on board this thing will take off.’ Is that how this works? Or is it more like: ‘We’re off the market and we like what you’re doing and know you need capital so here gimme 25 Million Dollars worth of shares at say .30 with warrants to buy more at .40 and you just get this capital NOW to do whatever you gotta do.’ As in, is it a sign of weakness like a company is needing money? But, I guess even in that situation that means the investor believes the stock will go up if he exercises warrants to buy more at a higher price.. ??????????????? Just spitballin, would love to hear some input. Thanks in advance! &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/Jibbcar [link] &#32; [comments]
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  37. $FOLD (pharma) Just tanked to an all time low due to terrible news. I think this is a solid buy for a stock with a 3bn cap. (14/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    https://finviz.com/quote.ashx?t=FOLD So, Amicus Therapeutics, Inc. (FOLD) tanked yesterday. It plummted from $19 to $13 in the space of a day. Basically blew 30% of it&#39;s price. They are a pharma company who work on specialist disease treatment. They announced yesterday that their trial drug for something called Pompes Disease (a rare one that fucks up 1 in 40,000 people) hadn&#39;t performed better than the current market leader used for treatment. In fact, it probably performed a bit worse. The disease destroys bones or something and the drug helps people move, but the current drug helps them move better than this new one. Anyway, enough of that morbid shit, what I see here is a huge TANK of a stock which will clearly recover. They are a big company with big money moving around, so its not some Aerotyne shit which will collapse tomorrow due to this news. Even the toughest downgrade of price from Cantor after this news, put the target price from $30 to 17 and JP Morgan set it an $19. It&#39;s currently running at 12.57. Im buying into this at balls deep levels on Tuesday. It&#39;s gonna be a long hold, this result has set the stock to a 5 month low, but in December it was trading at 23.09. There&#39;s some decline which has gone on during Jan which I cant explain, but even if the target price is accurate, for a long hold with 25-30% rise can&#39;t be that bad. Note, this is gonna be a long hold. 6 months ish, so don&#39;t go buying it and expecting moonjuices by next Thursday. &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/electricp0ww0w [link] &#32; [comments]
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  38. Strategy change - Wallstreet bets taught me how to make money, consistently. (14/02/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    After being a traditional trader for years and chasing that stock that’s gonna make me rich I changed strategies... I’m now making around $1000-$1500 month by watching wsb and selling covered calls and puts. Let me explain... Watching these people gamble their life savings buying calls and hoping really got me feeling envious...of the people selling the calls! So I started looking at the fundamentals, long buying the shares (or at least covering them) and then selling calls and puts. You don’t get that rush, and it’s slow and boring, but it pays. Also, the risk is what I consider low and the consistent return is around 15-20%. I have been doing this for 3 months now and I’ve averaged $1320/month with an account of $60k. I am currently selling calls and puts in PLTR, BB, BA, AMC, YOLO and TRVG. Here is what I do... I sell calls for the meme stock just far enough out of the money that if the stock does shoot up, I let the option exercise, and I make double. Also the volatility is so high that these pay a month, and have a typical premium of about twice what a “normal” stock has. With “normal” stock I aim for 20% and sell calls just high enough to make 20% plus the premium if the stock goes up. No movement, I make a boring couple hundred bucks and continue to own my stable stock and then repeat! If it does sell or it shoots up, I’m just happy to reach my goals and I move on, re-evaluate, repeat. I sell puts like a “time machine”. I look at the fundamentals, figure out where I want to own that overvalued stock, make sure I can cover it, then sell the put. I haven’t had to buy it yet, and it pays, again, a boring few hundred dollars. For example, I’m currently selling puts in PLTR at 25 and YOLO at 20. Both good to own for that price! (But the premium on PLTR is rich!) TLDR: Thanks to WSB, I’m making good money. I won’t be a millionaire anytime soon, but I’m not gambling my life savings either and I get to sleep at night. ???? You know what is actually making me rich? Bitcoin. But that’s for a different discussion. &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/Bayou38 [link] &#32; [comments]
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  39. Thoughts on #DASH today. Doesn’t make sense, can someone explain? (09/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I bought puts yesterday and made a killing, decided to hold them through today’s IPO share unlock because i was 100% confident this piss poor company was going to dump. But for some reason it’s going up? from what i can tell, sell volume is absolutely dwarfing the buy volume of this stock right now. I’m kinda new to this so can someone explain why it could go up when there is a vast majority of selling rather than buying ? Is anyone else still confident that this stock will fall this week? &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/gradog82 [link] &#32; [comments]
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  40. If "Everybody's a genius in a bull market," and bull markets last an average of about 3.8 years, shouldn't we be smooth sailing for a bit? (13/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I recently read that bull markets can be characterized in a variety of ways, but based on several commonly used merits, the most recent bull market lasted (a record) 11 years (from &#39;08 until March of last year). The ensuing, relatively short-lived bear market was just around a month long before returning to bull. So, if the adage, &quot;Everybody&#39;s a genius in a bull market,&quot; rings true, would it be reasonable to expect my recent &quot;success&quot; in the stock market to be extended for a few more years before seeing a critical hit on my portfolio? p.s. I&#39;m 28 years old and been investing 7-10 months (my first few months were extremely limited) &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/cbantle [link] &#32; [comments]
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  41. Taking a break from investing (03/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I started investing back in march of 2020 when the market was tanking. I had no idea what I was doing. Although, I did know a little about ETFs. So I decided to buy VTI and a couple of other ETFs at around the $120/$200mark. With some leftover cash, I pumped money into stocks that I read in news articles. That&#39;s right, I would look up &quot;the best stocks of march 2020&quot; and basically buy the first thing on the list on some random article. I guess I got lucky and made about 4k - a 30% return overall. Then comes GME, BB, AMC, etc. I basically lost about $2500 total because of FOMO. That chewed up a lot of my profits, but it was okay because it was money I could lose. I&#39;m glad that it wasn&#39;t worse. It was a huge eye-opener though because I realized that I had around 5-8k in certain stocks that I did absolutely 0 research on besides using the google search bar. Likely these investments could&#39;ve dropped to 0 but thankfully didn&#39;t. The moment I lost that amount of money on the speculative stocks, I liquidated all my positions except for some ETFs. It didn&#39;t matter if I was up or if the stock was likely to get gain xx%. I decided that as a DYI investor, I needed to understand fundamentals: reading and analyzing statements, industrial comparison, etc. I also needed to have a general understanding of the economy, and maybe even understand Technical Analysis. I needed to become a prudent investor and not invest unless I understood every aspect of the company. I missed out on a lot of gains these past X months (besides my ETFs), but I have no regrets. I will continue learning each and every day until I&#39;m confident enough to invest again. Even then I could lose money but at least I&#39;ll know I tried my best. I would also like to encourage anyone else that doesn&#39;t have a sense of what&#39;s going on to take a step to the side and look at the situation. If you are reading someone&#39;s DD and 1/2 of the terms don&#39;t make sense, it&#39;s probably a good idea to take a step to the side to learn about them before doing blind investing (gambling). &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/DuePanini [link] &#32; [comments]
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  42. What is debt? (29/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Dumb question (sorry): I often read about US printing money/iussing bonds referred to be as &quot;debt&quot;... but what does this mean? Why printing more money = debt? What does this mean? Can someone explain to me how does the process work and why is printing money called debt? &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/luchins [link] &#32; [comments]
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  43. It doesn't take a genius to win in stock market. Also, It's always better to keep things super simple. There's a reason why staying awaying from complexities helped Buffett and Munger. (30/03/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/ZealousidealDamage65 [link] &#32; [comments]
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  44. Do you ever get emotionally invested in a stock? (16/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    My very first stock was LOCO, the only reason I bought it was because I was eating El Pollo Loco at the time. It has yet to lose me any money and no matter how I move my portfolio around I never touch that stock. Second is APHA this stock just straight up angers me. All my stocks go up and down I mean that what stocks do right? But this stock acts like it&#39;s on a trampoline and keeps falling off of it and getting back up. Some days it&#39;s my highest earning and some days my biggest loser. It&#39;s never ever consistent. I also hold TLRY and that one has done nothing but lose me money. It has been consistently my biggest loser (I bought really high) but I&#39;m ok with it. It&#39;s consistent so it is what it is. But APHA is just on a good one and it angers me. . Are there any stocks you hold that play with your emotions? &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/ragstorichespodcast [link] &#32; [comments]
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  45. Can anyone explain how Roblox ($RBLX) going public actually works? (09/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I am thinking about throwing a good bit of money at it via market order set for tomorrow&#39;s open, but I&#39;d be doing that without any real understanding of how it works. I just assume the price will just go up, but I know literally nothing about this. Can anyone ELI5? Anyone else putting money in it? &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/ProperGentlemanDolan [link] &#32; [comments]
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  46. Can someone explain how they are giving money away? (13/02/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/Whereismymoneydavid [link] &#32; [comments]
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  47. Can someone give me a breakdown of call and put on Robinhood (15/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    So basically I just got interested in stock options but am so confused where to start. I use Robinhood and basically I bought $18 worth of a stock. Call me stupid or whatever I really dgaf, but. Anyway could someone explain to me what happens now: I bought 1 contract of NFLX $700 Call 5/15 buy (or it says it’s pending as of now). So does this mean if the stock price is over $700 on May 15th (which is obviously highly unlikely: NFLX is $412 rn) that I would make a bunch of money? I realize that this was stupid to do but I am trying to learn. Can anyone just give me the run down &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/VickyRoBy [link] &#32; [comments]
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  48. Can someone please explain (19/03/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    If the price of a stock goes up when people are buying and goes down when people are selling, couldnt someone with a lot of money just buy millions of dollars worth of a penny stock, which in turn would boost its price and guarantee that person profit if they sold soon after? I understand how this would not work with a larger stock beacuse those millon dollars worth of shares would just be dilluted with the rest? But with a small stock surely millions of dollars worth is a large percentage of the shares available? Demand increase while supply stays the same= Increase in value? What am i missing? &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/pav313 [link] &#32; [comments]
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  49. Rolls Royce (RYCEY) question (10/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    What are y’all’s honest impressions about this stock. I just sold a lot of oil stocks and am looking to make a move. I understand it has done a stock split a couple of times so it won’t quadruple my money or anything, but I feel like it definitely has potential to double. Any of y’all feel the same way? Any risk you see them going bankrupt? &#32; submitted by &#32; /u/jdavis1791 [link] &#32; [comments]
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