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19 September 2021
13:57 hour

Companies to buy now and hold for 1 year

Reddit Stocks

15/09/2021 - 05:23

I currently have 85% invested in VTI and 15% in cash waiting for the correction that never came (over the last 12 months). Holding individual stocks 3+ years seems too passive (i.e., boring) for me. Looking to buy calls in large cap companies to sell in 8-12 months. Just bought 4 ATM SE calls expiring in 6/2022 and hoping to add a few others. Leaning towards MSFT and NVDA but hesitate as both are near ATHs. BABA frightens me. Appreciate any suggestions!   submitted by   /u/sassymotha [link]   [comments]


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  32. Did ETF's/Index funds just trend sideways from 2000 - 2009? (19/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  33. fundamental conflict between cyclicals and long term capital gains (14/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  34. ARKG (15/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  35. Sell Chinese, buy American? (25/07/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  38. Chinese online education stocks (07/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    During last year, Chinese online education stocks like TAL and YQ have been pumped to unbelievable highs. My mom bought those two stocks and a few others, losing more than 60% on each of them. She's done no research on any of these companies, and yet says that they can grow higher. What do you think? Hold or sell?   submitted by   /u/Inferdo12 [link]   [comments]
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  39. CARR or TT for long term? (31/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I was wondering if I should go with CARR or TT for a long term hold. I also have HON. Should I just add a little in each? Thoughts on CARR or TT? I dont know much about this sector, but they seem like good long term companies to hold. Thanks.   submitted by   /u/apooroldinvestor [link]   [comments]
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  40. Sell or hold AMAT? (11/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Hi all. I've been in AMAT for years. Still has high analyst ratings, price targets in the 150s. BUT - it's gone up even faster than most stocks over the past year and change, reached into the 140s, and is now below 120. Is this one to sell? Wait for earnings on the 20th? Continue to hold because it'll definitely go back up? It's a big part of my portfolio and I'm struggling with what to do.   submitted by   /u/joenje33 [link]   [comments]
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  41. ADRs - for Chinese companies and others, how protected are stockholders? (13/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    -Do ADR shell companies hold one stock for every ADR stock they sell? -Are all the shell companies in the Cayman Islands? -Who owns the shell companies that issue the ADRs? Do they tend to be owned by the ownership of the actual company? What is the potential for abuse/corruption, and what protections are in place to protect the stockholders? -If the Chinese government attempts to enforce not allowing foreign ownership to include ADRs could they enforce that?   submitted by   /u/Proffesssor [link]   [comments]
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  42. Oil and gas companies continue to hold the line on capex, RBC report says (22/08/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  43. Important reminder about the 1-year Charts for the next few months! (06/03/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    It's March, an one-year anniversary of the crash of 2020, which means this view is going to extremely obscured in the next few months. Instead of showing the long term trends, we need to keep in mind now that one year views will show only the growth or whatever has happened SINCE the covid crash. Using 1.5-2 year views is going to give a much better overall picture instead of making 90% of stocks look like they grew 100%+ this year!! Just keep this in mind, I know it'll mess me up a ton when looking into new companies or looking at watchlist companies I've been checking for a while. Total brain teaser at this point, since most offer 1-2-5 yr charts it should be ok, but those using especially RH should watch out! Hope this helps :) (and that it's above the 500 char min ????)   submitted by   /u/BRBAdventures [link]   [comments]
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  44. Is it too late to grab Chad stocks like MSFT AMZN GOOGL ? (06/07/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Hey everyone, I'm about to go to university and have some money saved up. I'm putting my Retirement savings into ETFs, but with my tax free savings account I really want to hold these Chad companies like Google, apple, Amazon, etc. Long term. IMO these charts look very extended and I'm wondering if it's a bad time to throw my savings into these companies at all time highs after going parabolic. I know the companies look strong on paper but I wouldn't be surprised at a big market correction eventually. How do you guys feel about starting a position in these companies given these current market conditions?   submitted by   /u/Dab_Day [link]   [comments]
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  45. VOO + VTI vs. QQQM + QQQJ + VTI... 20+ year long term portfolio (DD) (27/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I am in the process of finalizing exactly what i want me portfolio to look like i want it to be simple, diversified, safe and efficient. VTI is my main holding at 70%. That will not change. I allocated 10% to stocks (my play/ fun/ risk), 5% to SCHD for dividends/ mostly value stocks, 5% to SMH (semi conductors), and 5% to VIS (Vanguard industrials) due to VTIs lack if industrials plus i believe infrastructure will be a big thing year over year. So that leaves me with 5% to go. I am debating on whether that is better allocated to tech heavy QQQM and QQQJ or VOO. QQQM This is the alternative to QQQ but has a lower daily volume and expenses ratio. They are identical, however, QQQ does hold one more stock than QQQM according to a few tools I've seen and this does result in a higher performance for QQQ (less than 1%) Tracks nadaq top 100 stocks Tech weight- 63% ER- 0.15% YTD- (-)0.47% 1 year- 71% 5 year- 24% 10 year- 20% QQQJ Tracks nasdaq 100-200 stocks. ER- 0.15% YTD- 1.67% 1 year- 18% Unfortunately this ETF is new and doesnt have any more performance data. Average YTD return- 0.59% Average 1 year return- 45% VOO Tracks the top 500 of the S&P. Tech weight= 34%. ER- 0.03% YTD- 4% 1 year- 62% 5 year- 16% 10 year- 14% Performances wise Voo best QQQM/J over the last year however QQQ has best VOO year over year. 7 of the top 10 holds of VOO (~23%)/ QQQ (~44%) are the same however hold they hold a much heavier weight in QQQ. 79 of QQQMs 103 holdings and 42 of QQQJs holdings are in VOO for a total of 121 holdings for abouts a 60% find overlap. This is where im not really sure which is best for me. On one had QQQM/QQQJ have consistently out performed VTI while VOO has fallen just short or been withing <1%. QQQM/J is much heavier into tech than VOO. which i believe to be a downside in the long 15-20 year hold (6 months ago I wouldn't have thought that but this correction we are in has humbled me). VOO does provide a much better diversification than QQQM/J while still being overweight in tech. The lower ER of VOO is a nice bonus. VOO does also have about 0.5% higher dividend pay out than QQQM/J put together. VOO is 98% large cap stocks while QQQM is 100% large cap but QQQJ is primarily Mid/ small (no actual weight available when i researched). Note- due to VOOs S&p weighting it has survived this dip we are in much better than QQQM/J, however, has the S&P rises to new highs will we see a pull back thatll wash that fact out...? In the end which is better is the question. Someone who believes in tech and or believes in up and coming tech could be easily persuaded to QQQM/QQQJ. While someone looking for diversification and less risk while still toting a nice return would be interested in the 500 holding VOO. Which will out perform the other over the next 20 years? Well that is a good question. Right now after this DD.... I am leaning towards QQQM/J. but i also am very tempted by VOO due to its wider holdings, lower ER and performance.   submitted by   /u/DaddyDersch [link]   [comments]
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  46. I made a spreadsheet to help myself a better long-term investor (28/08/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    TLDR; I made a spreadsheet that automatically tracks and adds up the Owner's earnings: About a week ago I made two posts called The Biggest Misconception of Investing & Companies that outearn, outlive, and outperform. In the first post, I talked about how investing is not looking at a company's stock price hoping it will go up. Instead, you should look at the company's earnings and collect it like a landlord would their rents — with the expectation that the earnings will one day be greater than the amount you invested. The second post details how companies with moats make more money than other companies and hence why they're better investments. I shared a simple, three-step process to identify companies with moats and stressed the correlation between companies with strong moats and Owner's earnings, a metric Warren Buffett created and uses to value companies himself. Unfortunately, Owner's earnings is not a standardized metric and is not provided in the financial statements. It can however be calculated. Many of you responded with very encouraging and kinds words. Thank you??. In that same vein, I made a spreadsheet based on these concepts that can and hopefully will help you and retail investors alike become better long-term value investors. For those of you unfamiliar with Owner's earnings, I will be making a post on this shortly for those of you who wanted me to delve into it more. For now, just know that it represents how much cash falls into the business owner’s pockets. Basically it is the amount of cash you’re left with after you spend on whatever you need to to maintain, but not grow, the business and is a more realistic and accurate portrayal of a company's intrinsic value than EPS, Operating Cash or FCF. What does this spreadsheet do? This spreadsheet puts you in the position of a business owner, who collects the earnings of their companies on a regular basis. When you own a share you own a part of the business and therefore receive a part of its profits. It does so by automatically tracking and accumulating your Owner’s earnings your shares. All you got to do is input your transactions — ticker symbol, date purchased, number of shares purchased, and share price. Instead of showing you your total portfolio value or day-to-day share price, which is not only irrelevant to long-term investing (mostly), but also suboptimal insofar as it can evoke volatile emotions and trigger poor decisions, this spreadsheet chiefly displays the Owner’s earnings of the businesses and shares you own. How will it make you a better long-term investor? This spreadsheet and the formula behind it have been meticulously designed to make you a better long-term investor. The formula is as follows: Your earnings = Owner's earnings per share * number of shares you own * days held/period To maximize your earnings, you must maximize each of its components. In doing so, you will have achieved the holy grail of long-term value investing: 1. Invest in great companies with wide moats To maximize owner’s earnings you must invest in great companies with wide moats that can and will grow their earnings at a high rate for many years into the future. You don't want a company whose earnings stay the same year after year, you want a company that can grow as fast as possible for as long as possible. 2. Buy stocks at a discount instead of panicking when it falls To maximize the number of shares you own you must hunt for value and bargains. You have a limited amount of money to invest so you naturally want to buy as many shares (or earnings) as you can with that money. If two similar companies make $10 a year, one of them selling for $50 a share and the other $25 a share, you're going to go for the one selling for $25 (assuming equal growth rates) because you can buy $20 worth of earnings for the same amount of money. In other words, you want to grow your earnings as efficiently as possible. 3. Hold on to companies for the long run and compound your money To maximize days held you must hold onto your shares for as long as possible. The logic behind this is simple: Each day you hold on to a stock, the more money you make. If you hold a stock for a year, you make 100% of its owner’s earnings for that year for every share you owned. If you own it for 6 months you get 50% of its earnings. The longer you hold onto a stock, the more earnings you accumulate, and the more your money compounds. Bottom line This spreadsheet is an improved, more automatic, and intuitive adaption from a solution I've been using myself and it's helped me become a more calm, collected, rational investor. Without it I would not have had as much fun finding great companies with strong earnings potential, nor would I have held onto them for as long as I have. In other words, it has made me a much more successful long-term investor and I hope it can do the same for you. Here's a copy of the spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1dkoTDNG_JWeYP-_GJNW8f_MVXfDbSWyZPlfTRo28OUM/edit#gid=2052305304 Looking forward to your feedback, comments, criticisms to make this even better ????   submitted by   /u/No_Try_5797 [link]   [comments]
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  47. I made a spreadsheet to help myself a better long-term investor (28/08/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    TLDR; I made a spreadsheet that automatically tracks and adds up the Owner's earnings: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1dkoTDNG_JWeYP-_GJNW8f_MVXfDbSWyZPlfTRo28OUM/edit#gid=2052305304 About a week ago I made two posts called The Biggest Misconception of Investing & Companies that outearn, outlive, and outperform. In the first post, I talked about how investing is not looking at a company's stock price hoping it will go up. Instead, you should look at the company's earnings and collect it like a landlord would their rents — with the expectation that the earnings will one day be greater than the amount you invested. The second post details how companies with moats make more money than other companies and hence why they're better investments. I shared a simple, three-step process to identify companies with moats and stressed the correlation between companies with strong moats and Owner's earnings, a metric Warren Buffett created and uses to value companies himself. Unfortunately, Owner's earnings is not a standardized metric and is not provided in the financial statements. It can however be calculated. Many of you responded with very encouraging and kinds words. Thank you??. In that same vein, I made a spreadsheet based on these concepts that can and hopefully will help you and retail investors alike become better long-term value investors. For those of you unfamiliar with Owner's earnings, I will be making a post on this shortly for those of you who wanted me to delve into it more. For now, just know that it represents how much cash falls into the business owner’s pockets. Basically it is the amount of cash you’re left with after you spend on whatever you need to to maintain, but not grow, the business and is a more realistic and accurate portrayal of a company's intrinsic value than EPS, Operating Cash or FCF. What does this spreadsheet do? This spreadsheet puts you in the position of a business owner, who collects the earnings of their companies on a regular basis. When you own a share you own a part of the business and therefore receive a part of its profits. It does so by automatically tracking and accumulating your Owner’s earnings your shares. All you got to do is input your transactions — ticker symbol, date purchased, number of shares purchased, and share price. Instead of showing you your total portfolio value or day-to-day share price, which is not only irrelevant to long-term investing (mostly), but also suboptimal insofar as it can evoke volatile emotions and trigger poor decisions, this spreadsheet chiefly displays the Owner’s earnings of the businesses and shares you own. How will it make you a better long-term investor? This spreadsheet and the formula behind it have been meticulously designed to make you a better long-term investor. The formula is as follows: Your earnings = Owner's earnings per share * number of shares you own * days held/period To maximize your earnings, you must maximize each of its components. In doing so, you will have achieved the holy grail of long-term value investing: 1. Invest in great companies with wide moats To maximize owner’s earnings you must invest in great companies with wide moats that can and will grow their earnings at a high rate for many years into the future. You don't want a company whose earnings stay the same year after year, you want a company that can grow as fast as possible for as long as possible. 2. Buy stocks at a discount instead of panicking when it falls To maximize the number of shares you own you must hunt for value and bargains. You have a limited amount of money to invest so you naturally want to buy as many shares (or earnings) as you can with that money. If two similar companies make $10 a year, one of them selling for $50 a share and the other $25 a share, you're going to go for the one selling for $25 (assuming equal growth rates) because you can buy $20 worth of earnings for the same amount of money. In other words, you want to grow your earnings as efficiently as possible. 3. Hold on to companies for the long run and compound your money To maximize days held you must hold onto your shares for as long as possible. The logic behind this is simple: Each day you hold on to a stock, the more money you make. If you hold a stock for a year, you make 100% of its owner’s earnings for that year for every share you owned. If you own it for 6 months you get 50% of its earnings. The longer you hold onto a stock, the more earnings you accumulate, and the more your money compounds. Bottom line This spreadsheet is an improved, more automatic, and intuitive adaption from a solution I've been using myself and it's helped me become a more calm, collected, rational investor. Without it I would not have had as much fun finding great companies with strong earnings potential, nor would I have held onto them for as long as I have. In other words, it has made me a much more successful long-term investor and I hope it can do the same for you. If you have any feedback, comments, criticisms please comment, or message me to me directly. ????   submitted by   /u/No_Try_5797 [link]   [comments]
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  48. What’s on your watchlist for the market dip? (23/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    My portfolio is looking red because I did buy into some new stocks recently, of course in tech, after not touching my portfolio for a year. But if I’ve learned anything from last March it is that when you see dips and downturns to hold and that its a good time to buy. I’m looking for some inspiration in strong companies that are at a discount to add to my portfolio. Any good picks that you guys are keeping on your watchlist looking to buy at today’s dips or if it keeps going down?   submitted by   /u/narcity1990 [link]   [comments]
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  49. Pepsi (PEP) bearish rating? (12/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I noticed that Pepsi (PEP) has a “very bearish” rating on Fidelity. It has the most bearish rating of any stock I hold. I don’t put much faith in ratings, but I am trying to understand why. It is profitable, owns a lot of varied consumer products, has a solid dividend, and should do okay with reopening and inflation. It doesn’t make sense to me that one of my low risk safety value companies has such a bad rating. Have I missed something? Still planning to hold it for 5-10 years.   submitted by   /u/Cats_books_soups [link]   [comments]
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