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19 September 2021
13:48 hour

Can somebody please explain me this ? How much it will cost me? What do I have to do if the price goes up to 100$ for example ? Thanks in advance!!

Reddit Stock Market

15/09/2021 - 04:00

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  42. Can someone please explain (12/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I'm sorry if this doesn't belong here so if it isn't I'll be on my way. First of all. I'm a rookie and I'm still learning the ropes. I'm not asking if I did a good trade or what I should do next. I'm not even asking for advice. I''m just trying to figure out the math on something that I cannot find online because I don't know what I should be looking for. So here it goes: I bought 118$ worth of SVRA @2.36$ couple weeks ago The price started to decline. Now SVRA is @1.78$ (Actually -25% on my investment right now) This should've been a day/week trade but as I'm a rookie I'm still learning but now I'm holding the bag. I recently sold another stock with profit. So I now have 600$ to spend. What would happen if I spend 600$ or part of this money on SVRA at the price it is now? Will this lower my average% loss on the previous trade, leveling out? Making it easier to break-even or even gain profit? How do I go and calculate this for myself so I don't need to bother you guys for advice? I've tried using Position calculators but that doesn't tell me what I need to know. Can anyone explain how I can calculate this 'averaging' for next time if I'd want to do something like this? I can provide additional details if that would be necessary. Thank you   submitted by   /u/Cyay [link]   [comments]
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  43. BB options play (11/02/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    I was hoping somebody on here would be able to explain a few things to me - in 5th grader terms. I was curious what kinds of option plays people are making for BB, if any? Also if you could explain the logic behind it as well, that would be great! For example, I saw one person saying that they’re going to keep buying/selling puts to pocket roughly $400 each month and use that money to buy more shares or call options. I understand the logic behind buying long calls: you’re buying the rights to buy 100 shares of a stock at a value that is hopefully significantly lower than its current trading price (ex. Buying the right to own 100 shares of Tesla at $10/share when its current trading price is $800). I understand that part, but I don’t really understand the selling side of calls (like how can you sell a contract that you didn’t initially buy?) or buying/selling puts.   submitted by   /u/Broughiee [link]   [comments]
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  44. Can someone explain why the value on my option has gone down despite the share price being over my break even point? (02/07/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
      submitted by   /u/Kuraixxhayashi [link]   [comments]
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  45. Consolidation versus Constant Trend (16/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Could anybody explain why some stocks like Amazon consolidate for a long time and then have rapid upward price appreciation while other stocks like Google or Microsoft have more consistent steady price appreciation? Thanks.   submitted by   /u/CoyoteClem [link]   [comments]
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  46. Can someone explain to me why EU banks are a bad investment? (27/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Can someone explain to me why European banks are a bad investment. I have no positions in any of these For e.g, Banco Comercial Portugues SA have mkt cap 1.75B. September 2020 revenue was 891.28 million and net profit margin were 29.23%. December 2020 Rev. was 482.3M and profit margin 7.61%. P/E ratio on Google is 9.6 while on yahoo finance it was 11 I think (which I find strange) This is obviously looks bad going from huge profit margin to lower and revenue decrease but I still think at 480 Million revenue a quarter and 7.6% profit margin it is well worth 1.75B Bank of Ireland is worth 4B and it's revenue is 591.5M with profit margin 3.04%. So in comparison the Portugal bank looks great BNP parisbas is worth 64.54B. P/E is 9.73. Jun 2020 revenue 10.35B,net profit margin 22.22%, SEP 9.68B, 19.56%, Dec 9.75B, 16.32% Deutsch bank P/E ratio 155.92. Revenue past 3 quarters from latest to more recent 5.58B 0.91%, 5.68B 5.04%, 5.27B 3.57% Wells Fargo has P/E ratio 96.13 Why do investors put their money into Wells Fargo and Deutsche Bank when BNP Paris and Portugal bank look good? Can someone explain to me please? And why is it that the share price of Bank of Ireland or Portugals bank share price never recover in the slightest from 2008 while BNP Paris and bank of America are nearly back to were they were in 2008. Sorry for the formatting am on mobile.   submitted by   /u/kilyaan03 [link]   [comments]
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  47. Basic question about options that are "in-the-money" (16/08/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I've been trying to understand options for a few weeks now and I get the basic idea of it but some parts still don't make complete sense to me. Lets say stock ABC is currently trading at $30. Now from current trends and general stock market movements I estimate that in 1 week from now the stock will still be worth around $30. Stock brokers allows me to buy call options that are "in-the-money". Let's say $25 call options that expire in 1 week from now. That would mean if I buy 1 call option and wait patiently for a week for the contract to expire, I can now buy stock ABC for $25 and immediately sell for $30 netting me a $5 profit +- transaction costs. Why would anyone ever buy a stock option that is out of the money and take the risk that the target price is not hit? This seems way too fucking easy. There has to be something I am missing here or I am not understanding. Could someone explain? Thanks a lot in advance!   submitted by   /u/iTz_a_sNaKe [link]   [comments]
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  48. Will someone explain how averaging up is good for ROI? (14/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    If I buy a share at $1. It does well and increased to $2. I then buy another share now at $2.50. My cost basis now increased to $1.75. Why is this a good move as an investor? It seems you wouldn’t want to invest again once you’ve already invested.   submitted by   /u/Alwaysfavoriteasian [link]   [comments]
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  49. First year trading (10/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Hey all, 2020 was my first year buying/selling stocks. Is it going to cost more to file my taxes this year, someone told me places charge $50 per page to file. This cant be true, can it? If it is true, what did they mean by "pages"? I got like 5 documents from various companies showing my gains/losses, so would that be almost $300 to file taxes for me? I'd understand an extra price for the cost of filing due to more work on their end and don't have any problem, but if its going to cost me that much for the little bit of gains I made in 2020, the price of filing will diminish anything I made. Im just looking to find out from people that are experienced in this sort of thing seeing this is my first year.   submitted by   /u/Bigolbigboyboy [link]   [comments]
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