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19 September 2021
13:48 hour

£1K to invest? Here’s 1 FTSE 250 stock I would buy now!

The Motley Fool UK

14/09/2021 - 16:37

Jabran Khan details a FTSE 250 stock he would buy and hold forever if he had £1,000 to invest in his portfolio right now. The post £1K to invest? Here’s 1 FTSE 250 stock I would buy now! appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.


READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON THE MOTLEY FOOL UK

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  2. How to invest in US stock markets from a foreign country? (08/08/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  3. If you currently invest in the stock market but don't invest in crypto, why not? (13/09/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  5. 3 ways to invest in the FTSE 100 (17/08/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The FTSE 100 is the UK’s main stock market index. Made up of the largest 100 companies on the London Stock Exchange, it includes well-known UK shares such as AstraZeneca, Unilever, BP, and HSBC Holdings. We can’t invest directly in the FTSE 100. That’s because it’s simply an index. However, there are a number of ways to get portfolio exposure to it. Here’s a look at three straightforward ways to invest in the Footsie. FTSE 100 ETFs One of the easiest ways is through exchange-traded funds (ETFs). These are securities that track the movements of an index, sector, or asset. For example, if the FTSE 100 goes up 5%, a FTSE 100 ETF will go up 5% too. ETFs trade on the stock market just like regular shares, so they’re easy to buy. However, an account with a broker is needed to invest in one. There are a number of ETFs that track the performance of the FTSE 100, including: The iShares Core FTSE 100 UCITS ETF (ticker: CUKX) The HSBC FTSE 100 UCITS ETF (ticker: HUKX) The Vanguard FTSE 100 UCITS ETF (ticker: VUKE) One advantage of investing in these kinds of ETFs is that ongoing fees are very low. The HSBC FTSE 100 UCITS ETF, for example, has an ongoing fee of just 0.07% per year. On the downside, most brokers charge trading commissions to buy and sell ETFs. Footsie index funds Another way to invest in the FTSE 100 is through index funds. These are quite similar to ETFs in that they track the movements of indexes. However, they’re not traded on the stock market like ETFs are, which means the process of buying and selling them is a little different. Some popular FTSE 100 index funds include: The iShares 100 UK Equity Index The HSBC FTSE 100 Index The Legal & General UK 100 Index Trust The Vanguard FTSE 100 Index One thing to note about index funds is that overall fees are often higher than the fees for ETFs. This is due to the fact that many brokers charge higher custody fees for accounts with funds (ETFs are considered to be shares). Invest in the FTSE 100 by buying shares Finally, a third way to invest in the FTSE 100 is to buy individual Footsie shares, such as Unilever, Diageo, and Rightmove.  Buying individual FTSE 100 stocks is a riskier approach than buying an ETF or index fund because it increases stock-specific risk. This approach is also harder work. It takes time and effort to research the best stocks to buy. However, there are two main benefits of this approach. Firstly, investors have more flexibility in terms of portfolio construction. Don’t want to invest in oil stocks or tobacco stocks? No problem. Simply avoid stocks like Royal Dutch Shell, BP, British American Tobacco, and Imperial Brands. Secondly, investors can potentially outperform the index itself. Pick the right FTSE 100 shares and it’s possible to generate market-beating returns. The post 3 ways to invest in the FTSE 100 appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues Looking for new share ideas? Grab this FREE report now. Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits. From 2015-2019… Revenues increased 38.6%. Its net income went up 19.7 times! Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLED The opportunity here really is astounding. In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer? You could have the full details on this company right now. Grab your free report – while it’s online. More reading BHP share price surges on oil and gas deal: would I buy? These FTSE 250 growth stocks are crushing the index Why I would buy Amazon shares to hold until 2030 1 in 50 businesses expect to make people redundant in the next 3 months 3 cheap UK shares (including 2 FTSE 100 stocks) to buy right now! Edward Sheldon owns shares of Diageo, London Stock Exchange Group, Rightmove, and Unilever. The Motley Fool UK has recommended British American Tobacco, Diageo, HSBC Holdings, Imperial Brands, Rightmove, and Unilever. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  6. New to the stock world (11/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  7. If my stock earnings are enough to buy one more stock, should I sell them and then buy again with the initial investment + what I gained? (04/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  8. I sold this stock and I dont know if it was the right thing to do (18/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  9. Able to invest $1K a month (15/09/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  10. Looking to invest about $150,000, need advice on what and if now is a good time (25/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  11. Coca cola stock (17/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  12. These are the current constituents of the FTSE 100 (14/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The FTSE 100, also known as the ‘Footsie,’ is a stock market index comprised of shares from the 100 largest companies on the London Stock Exchange (LSE) by market capitalisation. In this article, we’ll look at the current constituents of the FTSE 100 and tell you of the requirements for inclusion as well as how often the list is reviewed. Which companies are constituents of the FTSE 100? The following is a list of the top 20 constituents of the FTSE 100 by market capitalisation as of 14 May 2021. Rank Ticker Company name 1 ULVR Unilever 2 AZN AstraZeneca Plc 3 HSBA HSBC Holdings Plc 4 RIO Rio Tinto Plc 5 GDE Diageo Plc 6 GSK GlaxoSmithKline 7 BATS British American Tobacco Plc 8 BP BP PLC 9 RDSA Royal Dutch Shell Plc ‘A’ 10 RDSB Royal Dutch Shell Plc ‘B’ 11 BHP BHP Group plc 12 RB Reckitt Benckiser Group Plc 13 AAL Anglo American Plc 14 GLEN Glencore Plc 15 PRU Vodafone Group Plc 16 LSEG Prudential Plc 17 VOD London Stock Exchange Group Plc 18 REL RELX Plc 19 LLOY Lloyds Banking Group Plc 20 NG National Grid Plc NB: Royal Dutch Shell is listed twice as it has two classes of shares on the LSE. You can find a complete list of the 100 companies that comprise the index and key information about them, such as their current market capitalisation, current share price and daily percentage change in share price, on the LSE website.  [middle_pitch] What are the requirements for inclusion in the FTSE 100? First, a company’s shares must be listed on the LSE and be denominated in pounds sterling. The company must also meet the minimum free float and stock liquidity requirements as established by the FTSE Group that operates and maintains the index. The final and most obvious criterion is that a company must be one of the top 100 companies by market capitalisation on the exchange. When are changes made to the constituents of the FTSE 100? A review of the FTSE 100 constituents is undertaken every quarter, usually in March, June, September and December. The rules for promoting or removing a company from the index are as follows: A share is promoted into the FTSE 100 if it rises to 90th position or above (by market cap). A share is removed from the FTSE 100 if it falls to 111th position or below (by market cap). This system is meant to reduce the number of continuous changes to the index as it ensures that a company only gets relegated or promoted when it clearly needs to be moved. That being said, just because a company hasn’t dropped to 111th position or below doesn’t mean that it won’t be relegated. It might still need to be dropped to make way for other companies that have met the inclusion criteria and are proving themselves more worthy of a place on the index.  How can I invest in the FTSE 100? There are two main ways to invest in the FTSE 100: Purchase individual shares in a FTSE 100 constituent company Invest in an exchange-traded fund (ETF) that tracks the index’s prices Before you can start investing, you will need a share dealing account. To help you narrow down your options, check out our comparison of some of the top providers of share dealing accounts in the UK. You can also invest in the Footsie through a stocks and shares ISA. Investing this way comes with the added benefit of tax efficiency. When you invest through a stocks and shares ISA, any income or gains from your investment are not taxed. Keep in mind, however, that tax rules can change and their effects on you will depend on your individual circumstances. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading I’d pick this share for its 6%+ dividend yield Can I be denied a job due to bad credit? A FTSE 100 share I’m buying for the stock market recovery Will the Admiral share price reach £35? Can I really save money by living in a tiny home? The post These are the current constituents of the FTSE 100 appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  13. Best stocks to buy now: here’s where I’d invest £5,000 (15/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Over the past six months, the FTSE 100 index is up 10%. This is a strong performance, and reflects the bounce-back in the UK economy from the pandemic. Within the index, there are plenty of stocks that have individual stories that put them among the best stocks to buy now. So if I had a £5,000 lump sum that I was looking to put to work, here’s what I’d do. Details of the £5,000 First, £5,000 is enough cash to warrant splitting it up into smaller chunks. In fact, I’d probably look to invest in around 10 stocks, with £500 in each. Of course, if I particularly like one stock, I can increase this amount.  Even though I’m focusing on the best stocks to buy right now, I wouldn’t invest the full £5,000 today. This is because there might be further opportunities to jump on later this year. So I would look to invest between £3,000 and £4,000 now, and hold some in cash ready to deploy in the coming months.  Finally, I’d want to ensure I didn’t just invest this amount into the best stocks over the summer and then forget about further investing down the line. If I do have further cash coming at the end of the year or even next year, I can look to invest more at that point in time. This allows me to build a portfolio over time. Finding the best stocks to buy now For the amount that I’m happy to invest right now, I’d look to take advantage of stocks that have both underperformed and outperformed the index 10%.  For stocks that have outperformed, I’d be buying for a momentum play. This is a strategy that banks on the fact that the rally could continue given the positive news. For example, Royal Mail and BT Group have both risen by more than 10% over the past six months. In fact, Royal Mail is the best performing stock in the index, up 68%. The company is seeing surging parcel delivery volumes, which is great. It’s also investing heavily in its operations, something that should support further growth as well. One risk here is that as we come out of lockdown, people will shop more in-store instead of ordering online and receiving items through the post. On the flipside, I can find some of the best stocks to buy now by looking at undervalued companies. The FTSE 100 index may have risen by 10%, but the London Stock Exchange Group share price has actually fallen by 12%. A lot of this slump is down to the high costs and debt associated with it buying data provider Refinitiv. I do acknowledge this, but I think the long-term benefits that the move has will outweigh such expenses. As a result, I think the share is undervalued and would look to buy it. Overall, I think there are plenty of options out there for me to invest portions of my £5,000 now. The best stocks to buy now change as time goes on, and so I want to remain active in this regard. The post Best stocks to buy now: here’s where I’d invest £5,000 appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues Looking for new share ideas? Grab this FREE report now. Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits. From 2015-2019… Revenues increased 38.6%. Its net income went up 19.7 times! Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLED The opportunity here really is astounding. In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer? You could have the full details on this company right now. Grab your free report – while it’s online. More reading Why this growing small-cap stock is one to watch This AIM stock is moving to the LSE’s main market. Should I buy? A FTSE 100 share with a 7% yield to buy now 1 British stock to buy for the travel recovery Should I buy Tirupati Graphite shares? jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  14. Beginner investing for long term (04/08/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  15. Help for a Beginner in the Stock Market (12/02/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  16. How I’d invest £1,000 in FTSE 250 stocks (27/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    If I were a beginner investor with £1,000 to invest, the first place I’d start looking is the FTSE 250.  The FTSE 100 is comprised of the largest 100 listed companies in the UK, and the FTSE 250 makes up the following 250 most prominent stocks. The FTSE 350 is both of these indexes combined.  I’d start looking for investments in the FTSE 250 as a beginner because this index is full of companies with more exposure to the UK, and smaller firms usually have brighter growth prospects. That said, this might not be a strategy that’s suitable for all investors. Bigger companies tend to be less risky investments because it’s easier for them to acquire financing and find skilled managers. On the downside, more prominent organisations can find it hard to grow. So there’s atrade-off to be had here.  Still, I believe there are some desirable opportunities in the FTSE 250. That’s why I would invest £1,000 as a beginner in this index.  FTSE 250 investments  I’d invest my money in market-leading enterprises such as IT provider Kainos Group. This company recently reported a 31% increase in revenue for its financial year ended 31 March. Diluted earnings per share also leapt 130% for the period, and the total value of cash on the balance sheet nearly doubled to £81m. I think there’s a strong chance this level of growth could continue as the world becomes more interconnected and businesses turn to Kainos to help them deal with IT systems.  However, this sector is also incredibly competitive. Therefore, there’s no guarantee the group’s revenue will continue to grow at a double-digit rate indefinitely.  I also wouldn’t invest all of my £1,000 in just one FTSE 250 stock or one sector either. Diversification  Another rapidly growing business I’d buy for my portfolio is Liontrust Asset Management. The specialist fund manager is currently benefiting from an increase in the demand for Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) investments, where it’s carved out a specialist niche for itself. Assets under administration doubled last year, and adjusted profit before tax rose 69%. If Liontrust can maintain its edge in the market, I think it has tremendous potential over the next few years.  The sector is competitive though, and while Liontrust has a strong reputation in the market, this shouldn’t be taken for granted. The company may begin to struggle if it doesn’t invest in growth.  The final stock I’d buy in my FTSE 250 portfolio is Biffa. Waste disposal is a niche and complex industry. But this business has the size, experience and scale required to dominate the market. The company might not be as exciting as fast-growing tech stocks. Still, I reckon its competitive advantages should help it grow steadily in the years ahead.  Risks to growth include additional regulations and higher costs, which could eat away profit margins. The post How I’d invest £1,000 in FTSE 250 stocks appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues Looking for new share ideas? Grab this FREE report now. Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits. From 2015-2019… Revenues increased 38.6%. Its net income went up 19.7 times! Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLED The opportunity here really is astounding. In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer? You could have the full details on this company right now. Grab your free report – while it’s online. More reading How I’d use £250 a month to create passive income 5 cheap UK shares to buy in July 2 of the top UK shares I’d buy now If I was new to investing I’d buy these FTSE shares A FTSE 100 stock I’d buy with £5k Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Kainos. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  17. Hypothetically, if you were to invest $100K into ONE stock with the intention to pull out within 1 month or less, which stock would it be? (10/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  18. Thoughts on Nintendo (NTDOY) and whether now is a good time to invest (29/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  19. Investing in pre IPO companies (18/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    The subject is OpenAi and I was wondering if there is a way to invest in the company before it goes public. The stock Is supposed to IPO at 20$ but by the time we get to invest in it, it will be over a 100. Thank you in advance.   submitted by   /u/Amarthus12 [link]   [comments]
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  20. Looking to invest in healthcare: Should I go with the PSCH ETF or invest in $VRTX stock? (07/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    New investor here, looking to diversify my portfolio with a bit of the healthcare sector. Should I go directly and invest in $VRTX? Or should I go for the $PSCH ETF? Both seem incredibly promising. Thoughts? I plan on investing long term btw, not swing trading/making a quick buck.   submitted by   /u/angeredduck [link]   [comments]
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  21. Can we stop with the substance-less posts? (26/08/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Honestly, I subbed this community to get more logical thinkers than WSB. Posting every day with “should I dump my life savings into AMZN?” Or “what’s the next biggest tech stock for my portfolio?” Are so fucking dumb. How about telling us about what you want to invest, why you’re investing, and overall money you’d like to invest over time? As a base, most of you are probably asking what the next biggest thing is because you can’t afford to buy more than a couple shares of a tech stock. simple solution, slowly invest into an S&P 500 index like VOO. Stop trying to get rich quick Nobody here on this sub can tell you that a price will be X next year so invest only what you want to risk. if you need to cut your neighbors lawn once a week for $20, put that extra money away. Circle back to bullet point 1. Stop asking what categories you should invest in. That’s like asking what your favorite meal is. Okay if it’s breakfast here are your X staples and your key players, etc. it’s not rocket science to pick interest categories, something has been successful in each. Do you like medicine? Look at biotech ffs do some research before asking u/bigdumbdumb for advice Hold your bag and stop being a pussy   submitted by   /u/Big_DumbDumb [link]   [comments]
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  22. Noob please help! (22/07/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Hello, I am 100% new to investing and know NOTHING. Checking things out I am wondering id this is feasible: Invest a small amount in a stock that has a reliable upward trend. Ride the current trend by selling the stock and then reinvesting in the same stock, growing as I move along the upward trend. No worries if it drops since I didn’t initially invest much. At that point I would just let it sit there and see what happens and start over anew. I read about wash rules and day-trading and it’s confusing. Day trading seems to be buying and selling in the same day. Is it Buying AND THEN selling? Or can the day trading rule be used interchangeably? For example - a single company ABC Day 1 - Buy stock at $50 Day 2 - Stock goes up to $52, sell stock. Immediately buy stock at $52. Day 3 - Potentially do the same thing if conditions are right? Essentially I am trying to build my value in that stock, climbing the upward trend. Does this now mean my investment in that stock is $52 and have a larger share not $50? Meaning my money will grow faster? Is this allowed or is this considered some form of cheating?   submitted by   /u/kewl_bruh [link]   [comments]
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  23. Looking to invest in US stock market? Know the process, costs, watchouts before you invest (11/03/2021 - Financial Express)
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  24. If you could go back to being a 22yr old college grad, (knowing what you know now) how would you allocate $50,000 to invest for retirement? (21/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  25. Looking for a stock calculator that tells me how many whole shares I can buy based on current stock price. (29/07/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Like the title states I’m looking for a calculator that will calculate the number of whole shares I can buy based on current stock price and how much money I’m looking to invest. Basically I want to put in a stock symbol (AAPL), the amount I want to invest ($10,000) and for the calculator automatically to tell me how many whole shares I can buy based on the current stock price ($145). The answer would be 68. Merril had something like this but since I started day trading in thinkorswim I can’t find a similar feature. When day trading on technical analysis timing is important. I’m looking for something like this so that I don’t have to do the manual math and save time.   submitted by   /u/Inevitable_Space_924 [link]   [comments]
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  26. Question about indexes. (13/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Hello, To keep things short - is it a good idea to half my investment in the FTSE 100 and buy into an index for the S&P 500 just for stability? I was also thinking of getting into an emerging markets index. ​ Also, what about world index trackers? Would it be better to sell my FTSE/S&P stock and buy all into that to keep the majority of my money in? ​ I've been stock picking a while but I don't have enough time to monitor and work with my account anymore so I figured it'd be better to dump it into an index and focus on school for now.   submitted by   /u/ColtAzayaka [link]   [comments]
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  27. How does my portfolio look? I just started investing this week. I invest in companies and cryptocurrency‘s that have positive feedback on the news for potential. I also invest when a stock is down, never up. How am I doing? And tips? Here is what I am inve (19/08/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
      submitted by   /u/Fickle-Introduction4 [link]   [comments]
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  28. So I don't have much to invest, and I don't understand the tricks of the trade, but is this an ok strategy for someone in my boat? (30/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    So I don't have much to invest (right now, I have put about $1000 in), and to put it bluntly, I'm pretty dumb when it comes to the stock market. I know the basics. Basically stocks 101. But what I can invest, I'm buying little bits at a time (1 to 2 shares in expensive stock, 5 to 10 in less expensive), mostly at the end of the week if I see a dip and only in industries I understand and follow. I like tech, so I've bought a few shares in Intel, AMD, and Sony just to test the waters. After a few days I was up on all 3. Then I saw Vizio was having it's IPO, so I purchased some of that. I was up about 9% after about 4 days. For shits and giggles I bought some AMC and Dogecoin as well. I'm in it mostly for the long game. I just want to buy and sit on stock. Then I read everyone says Palantir is a great long term stock and I read up on them and thought they have a bright future, so I bought some of that. I'm down on them, but going to hold for a long time. My question is, is buying a little bit of stock here and there, mostly in just industries that interest me and in "stable and reliable" companies only in dips, and holding for a long time viable? Or should I just save up my money and buy large amounts in one stock at a time? Thanks.   submitted by   /u/Knightmare25 [link]   [comments]
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  29. How I’d invest £500 a month in UK dividend shares to make £10,000 income (30/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    UK dividend shares are companies that pay out profits to shareholders in the form of dividends. If I buy shares of the company, then I’m entitled to some of the profits as well. One of the things I like with this style of investing is that there isn’t really a minimum amount I can buy. If I want to invest £50 or £50,000 in one go I can do so. The difference is that the amount I invest each month will impact how much I receive! Focusing on the yield not just the amount The general premise is that the larger the amount of money I have invested in UK dividend shares, the larger the payout I’ll be getting. For example, if I own 1,000 shares that pay a dividend of 10p per share, I’m going to get paid more than if I own 100 shares. However, investing more isn’t always the answer to trying to increase income potential. Another factor I can tweak is the dividend yield. The yield is a ratio looking at the dividend per share relative to the share price. If I target UK dividend shares with a higher than average yield, I won’t have to invest as much. Let’s say that I invested £1,000 into shares with an average yield of 6%. If a friend of mine invested £2,000 into shares with a lower dividend yield of 3%, we would both get paid the same annual amount. Even though they invested twice as much as me, my higher dividend yield compensates for this. It’s always important for me to remember though that the higher the yield I chase, the higher the risk is. If I find a company with a yield of 10% when the average FTSE 100 yield is 3%, then something could be wrong here. It could be that the business is in trouble, and the share price is falling. £10,000 income a year from UK dividend shares If I’m being careful, I can still find good shares with a yield above the average. But is it possible to end up making £10,000 of dividend income a year by only investing £500 a month? In short, yes it is. The main parameter that it hinges on is the timeframe involved. If I’m wanting to reach £10,000 by the time I retire, it’ll depend on how old I am now. For example, let’s say I invest £500 a month at the average dividend yield of 3%. In this case, it’s going to take me around 33 years to get an investment pot the size needed to generate me £10,000 a year. In my case, I’d want to speed this up, so I’m going to have to target a higher dividend yield. If I boosted the yield up to 6%, the time needed reduces significantly. It’ll take me just over 16 years to reach my goal via UK dividend shares. In my opinion, this is the best way for me to reach my goal. Now that I know what I’m trying to achieve, I need to pick specific UK dividend stocks. I wrote about some of my ideas, which can be read here. The post How I’d invest £500 a month in UK dividend shares to make £10,000 income appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. There’s a ‘double agent’ hiding in the FTSE… we recommend you buy it! Don’t miss our special stock presentation. It contains details of a UK-listed company our Motley Fool UK analysts are extremely enthusiastic about. They think it’s offering an incredible opportunity to grow your wealth over the long term – at its current price – regardless of what happens in the wider market. That’s why they’re referring to it as the FTSE’s ‘double agent’. Because they believe it’s working both with the market… And against it. To find out why we think you should add it to your portfolio today… Click here to get access to our presentation, and learn how to get the name of this 'double agent'! More reading Is it too late to buy this money-spinning FTSE 100 stock? Should I invest in a Stocks and Shares ISA? 2 FTSE 100 shares I’d buy for growth The Wizz Air share price has fallen 17%. Would I buy it now? 2 cheap shares I’d buy in July Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  30. Why invest in Berkshire Hathaway? (12/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I’m curious why I’d invest in BH because why not just invest in those individual securities that they have? Is it because we think they’ll get a better return? Or maybe because those companies will be able to invest more than I will? I’m not looking for investment advice, I’m just trying to understand holding companies work a little better and their appeal to investors. Thank you so much!   submitted by   /u/milkmanbran [link]   [comments]
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  31. Stock market crash! Here’s what I’d do if the FTSE 100 falls 20% (21/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Analysts are warning of a stock market crash (again). The FTSE 100 fell 100 points on Friday, and that brought out the doom mongers. Inflation is the main worry this time. As price growth hits 5% in the US, and 2.1% in the UK, many investors fear central bankers will be forced to reign in stimulus to stop the economy from overheating. That means higher borrowing cost, and less hot money flooding into assets such as shares. There’s a big debate over whether the inflation resurgence is temporary, or built to last. But right now, the answer is nobody knows. Even if it’s the former, investor nervousness could still trigger a stock market crash. So what would I do? Any investor who buys shares has to accept that the FTSE 100 could crash 20% at any time. That’s what stock markets do. They go up, mostly, but they crash pretty often too. Most people will remember the dotcom crash of 2000, the financial crisis crash of 2008 and last year’s Covid crash. There have been plenty more along the way, now largely forgotten.  Yes, the FTSE 100 could fall This volatility is the price equity investors pay for the superior long-term returns they generate from stocks and shares shares. Volatility isn’t a bad thing. Arguably, it’s a good thing.  I’ve trained myself to view a stock market crash as a great opportunity to buy shares at a reduced price. I don’t find it easy, buying when everybody is selling. I’m at the mercy of the herd instinct, just like everybody else. Yet I steel myself to take the opportunity when it arises. If the FTSE 100 does crash 20%, I’d aim to buy more of my favourite UK shares, at temporarily reduced prices. I’m not scared of a stock market crash I can take this ‘risk’ because I plan to keep my portfolio invested for the rest of my life. To retirement, and beyond. So any money I invest this year could be in the market for a further 30 years. That should give it plenty of time to climb in value. Another advantage of a stock market crash is that I invest a regular monthly sum into a pension. If share prices fall, I get more stock for my money. I also reinvest all my dividends. They pick up more stock, when share prices are down. When markets recover, I will own more shares than if they hadn’t crashed at all. Naturally, a stock market crash can be traumatic. Nobody likes to see the value of their savings plunge. Like everybody else, I’d feel better if the stock market shot up 20% instead. Not all shares are guaranteed to recover and any recovery might take some time. But history shows that, in the longer run, stock markets recover from a crash. It should happen next time too. And the next… The post Stock market crash! Here’s what I’d do if the FTSE 100 falls 20% appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. There’s a ‘double agent’ hiding in the FTSE… we recommend you buy it! Don’t miss our special stock presentation. It contains details of a UK-listed company our Motley Fool UK analysts are extremely enthusiastic about. They think it’s offering an incredible opportunity to grow your wealth over the long term – at its current price – regardless of what happens in the wider market. That’s why they’re referring to it as the FTSE’s ‘double agent’. Because they believe it’s working both with the market… And against it. To find out why we think you should add it to your portfolio today… Click here to get access to our presentation, and learn how to get the name of this 'double agent'! More reading Vodafone vs BT share price rated Three FTSE 100 dividend shares for extra passive income in 2021 Here’s why I think the Vodafone share price is undervalued Is the Vodafone share price a bargain? 2 FTSE 100 stocks to consider buying this bank holiday weekend Harvey Jones has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  32. GameStop shares surge on first day of trade as largecap stock, AMC zooms 7% despite not make the cut (29/06/2021 - Financial Express)
    Popular memes stock GameStop has gone from a smallcap stock, favoured by short-sellers to a large-cap stock and the newest member of the FTSE Russell 1000 index.
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  33. Dont accept requests to invest other peoples money (24/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I started messing around on the stock market early last year and made a small amount of money, my family wanted in on the action and my mothers fiance wanted to invest £1000. I protested since I'm not an experienced trader and could loose it all... my mother kept asking me for weeks to do it for him and i eventually caved and took his money.. well what do you know, I lost it all like an idiot. And now he is asking for it back after it is all gone and I litterally don't have the funds to give it back. Please learn from my mistake, many people assume that if they invest money with someone making/made money on the stock market that they will too and that their money is somehow safe when its really not.   submitted by   /u/cluckcucked [link]   [comments]
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  34. Looking to do my First Investment, thinking of a Global Index Fund - do any not have monthly minimums? (15/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    So I’m gonna start by saying i am a newbie when it comes to investing, I’m looking for something on the safe side that I can make investments in when I have a few hundred to spare every so often, looking for something long term. I’m starting university in September so when I looked at Vanguards FTSE Global All Cap Index Fund, the 500 starting ‘deposit’ is fine but the 100 monthly minimum worries me a little, what would happen if I wasn’t able to make the 100 minimum one month? Are they any alternatives to look at? I’m U.K. based if that helps. I’m not 100% set on the vanguard FTSE fund but from the reseach I’ve done it seems that investing in a global fund would be safer than s&p500 or FTSE 100, any advice or help would be appreciated! I’m going to be getting about £4k soon so I’m looking to invest a good chunk of that. What would I be looking at in 10 years or so if the market follows the current/previous trends? Many thanks!   submitted by   /u/kitaisaradish [link]   [comments]
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  35. CLOUDERA stock (04/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    What do you guys think about this stock? It has gotten some very good news recently and I think the stock has tremendous promise. It is much more reasonably priced at the moment compared to stocks that are similar to it. It has beaten its EPS for numerous quarters. What are your opinions on this stock? Would you invest in it it? Why or why not?   submitted by   /u/Confident_Glass_6381 [link]   [comments]
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  36. Where would you invest the stimulus check money if you had to invest it all today? (30/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I’m wondering, if you guys still had all of the recent $2000 stimulus check and have to invest it all today or in the near future in the stock market, where would you guys park the money? I’m thinking more in terms of mutual funds, but don’t really know where to start. Would love to pick your brains a little. Thanks!   submitted by   /u/thsndmiles30 [link]   [comments]
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  37. Should you invest in Tesla even if you only can afford two shares? (14/08/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    I don't have a lot of money, I am right now in high school. So I get approximately 125$ each month and I don't live near a city so side jobs is a challenge. So I have some money that I have saved for a while and I thought it would be better to have it in a stock instead of just having it lay around without it increasing in value. Is it too risky to invest in Tesla, should I just lay it in a safe stock that gives an 8% yearly increase or should I go with Tesla? ​ The future for electric cars and Tesla looks quite promising or what are your thoughts.   submitted by   /u/unworrior [link]   [comments]
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  38. I need to invest my money asap before it keeps going down in value - help (16/08/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I have around $40k in my savings account. My money is rotting away in my bank and I want to know how to properly invest. I currently am signed up with Fidelity with my company and I saw a Graham Stephen video that said to consider FXIAX, FZROX and FNILX. Which one do I choose and how much should I invest? Is it also beneficial to invest into multiple ones like Index, Total market, international and bonds? Also, are these treated as regular investments or as retirement funds? I want to be able to withdraw money without paying penalties. Final question: I know people say time in the market beats timing the market, but since stock prices are high right now, do I still buy immediately or wait? I'm a complete beginner and I need some guidance.   submitted by   /u/2point9AIDSBOW [link]   [comments]
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  39. £1000 to invest? Here’s one FTSE 250 tech stock I’d consider (24/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    If I was to invest £1,000 in the UK stock market, I’d consider some of the promising stocks of the FTSE 250. One such company that’s recently caught my eye is Spirent Communications (LSE:SPT). This is a business involved in the UK’s much anticipated 5G rollout. The tech is getting set to rapidly advance the world as we know it, into (we hope) a technologically superior future. Spirent is an engineering company rolling out the infrastructure necessary for this revolution. I’m quite intrigued by the potential of 5G and the growth opportunities it presents. Why invest in this FTSE 250 stock? Spirent Communications was founded way back in 1936. As well as 5G, it’s also involved in cybersecurity. This is an increasingly vital cog in all businesses with an online presence. It provides cloud based automation and testing solutions for a variety of needs. It also creates simulators that allow reliable testing in the performance of autonomous vehicles. These are disruptive areas of technology that are building momentum in our changing world. 5G is particularly exciting because its instantaneously high speeds could be game-changing for so many aspects of industry. For instance, 5G connections are super-fast and reliable. This should allow for seamless multi-person video calls, autonomous driving, augmented and virtual reality solutions. Plus, it should greatly enhance those artificial intelligence programs that need to operate in real-time. Risk vs reward There’s considerable competition in the 5G infrastructure sector. You see, BT, Virgin Media and Vodafone are all vying for similar contracts. It also comes with high costs and immense responsibility. Managing the data transfer of vital and often sensitive communications is a serious business. Until October last year, Spirent Communications’ share price had been on an upward trajectory for the best part of half a decade. And up to today, its price has risen 216% over five years. It now has a £1.4bn market cap. And it has a forward price-to-earnings ratio (P/E) of 22, with earnings per share of 9p and a 1% dividend yield. Its full-year revenue grew 4% for 2020. It seems the recent pullback in its share price may be due to a slowdown in revenues caused by the ongoing pandemic. A long-term investment When I’m looking to invest in the FTSE 250 or any other area of the market, I always think long term. That’s because it’s easy to become distracted by short-term fluctuations in the market, but I want to invest in companies that are going to be around far into the future. Therefore, if I think about businesses that are offering a service and have a reason to be here for the long term, then I think it makes for a more appealing investment. I feel Spirent Communications ticks this box. My primary concern is that it may not have enough of the competitive edge that I’d like. I’ll have to keep an eye on that. But I do expect it to go the distance. And I’d be happy to invest £1,000 to buy shares in this FTSE 250 business today. For regular stock market investing ideas and help choosing the best shares to buy now, sign up to The Motley Fool today. One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading Shares to buy today: 3 FTSE 250 stocks I’d add to my portfolio Kirsteen has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post £1000 to invest? Here’s one FTSE 250 tech stock I’d consider appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  40. Things I wish I knew before I started jnvesting (23/05/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    I’m still a new investor and I want to give some advice to new investors too about things I wish someone told me. If y’all have any other advice let me hear it. 1. Don’t panic sell- just because a stock has a bad day don’t panic sell and lose your money. If you truly believe in your stock, it will go back up. 2. Starting out invest in ETF’s- this is probably the thing I wish I could’ve been told. ETF’s are like and mutual fund but you can buy it anytime during the day. They r a safe way to consistently make money. They won’t lose you money(if you pick a good one) in the long run. 3. Don’t buy a stock because someone said to- I have fallen victim to “hype” stocks that I think will be the next GME, but ultimately fall 50%. I’m down about 20% in my portfolio because I bought into stocks that are sketchy. 4. Stay away from options- some new investors may not know what it is and it should stay that way. It is the equivalent of gambling. 5.crypto- crypto is very volatile and u could lose your whole investment in a day. I wouldn’t say you shouldn’t invest in crypto, but be smart. Also don’t buy DOGE it’s literally a meme. 6. Don’t invest money that your aren’t prepared to lose- the stock market is unpredictable sometimes. A new pandemic could occur or a world war could breakout or another Great Depression could happen. We don’t know when or how, but the market could crash at any time, so don’t invest money that you aren’t prepared to lose. Hopefully this will help someone:)   submitted by   /u/Ok_Midnight2894 [link]   [comments]
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  41. Is it too late to invest in NVAX? (08/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Seen a lot of positive outlook for this stock, but I also see a lot of people on old r/stocks threads who got it when it was $10 per share. Now it's $200. If I only have $500 to invest is it even worth it at this point or has the ship kind of sailed at this point?   submitted by   /u/paulrudder [link]   [comments]
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  42. Starting fresh (12/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Hey guys, I’ve always been interested in getting into the stock market, I already invest in other means other than stocks using vanguard but I would like to head into stocks and invest in the long term. How much should I put in as a beginner and how do I know where to start?   submitted by   /u/JayDeesus [link]   [comments]
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  43. 3 ways I’m trying to beat the FTSE 100 this year (26/07/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    As an active investor, I want to beat the performance of the FTSE 100. Why? Well, the FTSE 100 index is the general benchmark used when trying to measure the performance of the stock market in the UK. There are other measures that I could use to compare my performance against. I could try and beat the rate of inflation, the rate of interest on a Cash ISA, or other comparatives. Yet I think the FTSE 100 is the best and most relevant metric to use. Here are a few ways I’m trying to beat it this year. Investing regularly The first method I’m using is trying to invest regular amounts throughout the year. This way, I can be selective and try to use my funds for that period to buy on any potential dips. For example, in July we saw a drop of almost 300 points over the course of a few days in the FTSE 100. So I could have bought at this lower level for my July allocation. Obviously, it’s impossible to always buy at the bottom of each dip, but as long as I’m trying to avoid buying at the very top, this should help me to beat the FTSE 100 performance over a longer period. This is because on average, my buying price will be lower than the average FTSE 100 price during the year.  This method assumes that I buy a FTSE 100 tracker each time, to try and replicate the overall index. If I want to be more active with my stock selection, my second method would suit me better. Buying selective FTSE 100 stocks The second way I’m considering is to buy a selection of FTSE 100 stocks. The index reflects the price of all the constituents, so if I can remove the shares I think will underperform and invest more in those I think will outperform, I could beat the index.  It’s less about cutting out entire sectors from my portfolio, but rather being selective in the stocks I pick from each sector. For example, within the banking space, I’d prefer to own NatWest over HSBC. I feel the position in the market that NatWest has in the UK, along with its more streamlined business model, should allow it to outperform HSBC. The risk of this method is that I will be more concentrated in my holdings. I might hold a dozen stocks or so, versus holding the entire index. So if there are a few stocks that see a large share price gain that I’m not holding, I could start to lose ground on the index over the year. Boosting returns The final method I’m trying is to factor in dividend income. My overall return over the course of the year isn’t just from share price gains or losses, but also from the income I’ve received. The average FTSE 100 dividend yield is currently around 3%. So if I can be selective and own stocks with yields in excess of 3%, this can provide another boost when I tot up my returns at the end of the year. Regardless of whether it’s via dividend income, buying on dips or being selective in my stock picks, I can try and beat the FTSE 100 over time. The post 3 ways I’m trying to beat the FTSE 100 this year appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Our #1 North American Stock For The ‘New-Age Space Race’ Billionaires like Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and Mark Zuckerberg are already betting big money on the ‘new-age space race’, and for one very good reason… …because this is an industry that according to Morgan Stanley could be worth $1 TRILLION by 2040. But the problem is most of their investments are in private companies — meaning they’re largely off-limits for everyday investors. Fortunately, our team of analysts have identified one little-known company that’s at the cutting-edge of the space industry, and is currently trading at what looks like a VERY reasonable valuation… …for now. That’s why I want to urge you to check out our premium research on this top North American space stock ASAP. Simply click here to see find out how you can grab your copy today More reading Is this FTSE 100 bank stock worth buying? Is this what the NatWest share price needs to finally get moving? 6.7% dividend yields! 3 FTSE 100 shares to buy HSBC or Barclays shares: which one would I buy? 2 top UK shares to buy for the recovery jonathansmith1 has no position in any share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended HSBC Holdings. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  44. If I was opening a Stocks and Shares ISA today, here’s how I’d invest my money (27/08/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    A Stocks and Shares ISA is a great tool I can use as an investor. The general premise of the ISA is that I can build a pot over time that receives favorable tax treatment. As long as I buy and sell stocks within the ISA, the proceeds are exempt from capital gains tax. This means I can accumulate more profit over time without losing a chunk of it to HMRC. I’ve had an ISA for many years, but if I was just starting out, here’s what I’d do to begin with. Thinking about amounts and timing The first thing I’d consider once my Stocks and Shares ISA was open and ready to go is how much I can afford to invest. Technically, there’s a limit of £20,000 per year I can invest. But it doesn’t matter at what point I do this. I can invest in one lump sum, or every week. I also shouldn’t feel the pressure to invest the full amount as if it’s some kind of target.  In my first few years of having my ISA, I got nowhere near the limit! So if I was starting again, I’d look and see how much I can put away into the ISA. My preference would be to allocate money there each month, instead of a lump sum. This way it puts less pressure on my cash flow. When looking at the stock market, putting away some cash each month is beneficial. The FTSE 100 and other markets are volatile, and so are impossible to time perfectly. By buying stocks each month, it reduces the pressure on me to decide when is a good time. Obviously, I can try and buy on specific dips during a month, but I don’t need to get overly concerned. Over the course of the year, my average buying price should smooth out, which is the aim here. Picking where to invest for my Stocks and Shares ISA After deciding how much I can afford to invest in my ISA, I then need to decide where I should invest it. To begin with, I’d prefer to stick to large-cap FTSE 100 stocks. Although there are can be some great buys with smaller companies, liquidity can be an issue. This means the difference between the rate at which I can buy versus the rate I can sell at can be very large. In the beginning, I don’t really want to add in this complication, so would prefer to go for highly traded shares. I’d start at a top level, thinking about sectors I like. Personally, these include healthcare, financial services and renewable energy. From there, I’d see which FTSE 100 companies fit in these categories. I’d pick two or three from each area and build up my stake in each of them with my Stocks and Shares ISA over time. There are many things to consider when starting an ISA, but the above points cover the big things to get me well on my way. The post If I was opening a Stocks and Shares ISA today, here’s how I’d invest my money appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading 3 FTSE 100 stocks I’m watching in September Here’s why the Helium One (HE1) share price has been crashing When will the Cineworld share price recover? The Carnival share price is recovering. Should I buy now? The HSBC share price is falling. Is it the best bank to buy now? jonathansmith1 and The Motley Fool UK have no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  45. My grandpas giving me $100 to invest in stocks. (20/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I was telling him I mess around with the stock market some and he said he would give me $100 to start off and try and build up the $100 then we could split it. I just don’t know what I should put it in. One stock? Or break it up and put it in different stock?   submitted by   /u/Butcher_Pete2 [link]   [comments]
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  46. 2 ways I’m planning to invest in FTSE 100 stocks to get a six-figure portfolio (09/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    When looking to invest for the future, I want to aim to generate a large enough portfolio to make a difference as I get older. To this end, I want my portfolio to be in the six-figure range. For me, this will be enough to help me enjoy my retirement. However, a portfolio of FTSE 100 stocks worth that much won’t just fall into my lap. I’ll need to invest well over time in order to get to that end goal. Targeting higher growth One way I can look to reach my goal is to target high-growth FTSE 100 stocks. These types of companies usually have high earnings per share and reinvest profits back into the business to fuel future growth. This future growth, coupled with a positive outlook overall, often sees the share price rally as investors look at the potential value further down the line. As the outlook for high-growth FTSE 100 stocks can change quickly, volatility is usually quite high. However, given that I’m trying to get to a six-figure portfolio, I have time on my side. In this way, over several years, the growth rate by investing in these types of stocks should exceed more mature companies. A regular investment on a monthly basis in growth stocks could allow me to reach my goal quicker than other methods. I do need to be careful of high drawdowns though. After all, these type of stocks can be hit hardest during times of uncertainty. Lower-risk FTSE 100 value stocks? The flipside of going for the slightly aggressive option of growth stocks is to go for FTSE 100 value stocks instead. Value stocks are those that have low price-to-earnings ratios. In other words, they are seen as undervalued. As an investor, I could buy shares in these types of companies and hold them for the long term. In this way, the share price should return to a fairer value, which would represent a profit for me. Value stocks typically have lower volatility than growth stocks, which is positive. I personally think they also offer lower risk, as these are often established companies. The risk is that it can take a long time for value stocks to move back to a fair value, and the difference might not be that high. So, when looking to invest £500 or £1,000 a month in value stocks, it’ll likely take me much longer to reach my six-figure goal as my compounded returns will be lower.  Overall, I can see the merits of investing in either value or growth stocks within the FTSE 100 index. In fact, I’m not limited to selecting either option exclusively. As a result, to diversify my portfolio, I’d actually look to split up my selection into a mix of both types of stocks. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading How I’d aim to generate a rising passive income from UK dividend stocks Should I buy Biogen shares? Dechra Pharmaceuticals’ share price hits record peaks! Is it a top UK share to buy? Will Coinbase shares continue to sink? Cineworld shares are up 273% in 8 months. Am I too late to buy? jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post 2 ways I’m planning to invest in FTSE 100 stocks to get a six-figure portfolio appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  47. Should I invest in stocks as savings for house? (21/08/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    I got into the stock market just over 2 months ago. I've just been investing in large trustworthy companies like Microsoft, Adobe, Nvidia; and two index funds SPY and QTEC. It's been going really good so far, profiting $85 in these 2 months with just $2000. I invest about $1000 each month. I have $1000 in Bitcoin too, but I'm just testing that one out right now. Is it wise to use the stock market as a savings for a down payment on my first house? It wouldn't be for another 2 years that I actually start seriously looking at houses. Should I also have a bank savings account, in case something goes bad with the market? If so, what percentage stock vs. savings is ideal?   submitted by   /u/Ok-Seaworthiness2487 [link]   [comments]
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  48. First time stock buyer advice (07/09/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Hello, I just turned 18, I'm a freshman in college, and I'd like to start investing in small amounts to get a feel for the market. I want to invest in a company that has little risk and yields a decent dividend yearly. Coca cola and amazon are two that I've looked at, but I'm curious if anyone has better advice. On a side note, how much would you recommend putting into my first investment? I've heard you wanna at least invest $500 into any given stock, however I'm thinking about going with half at $250 as it's my first time. Thanks in advance   submitted by   /u/OldGregRL [link]   [comments]
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  49. Home depot, to invest or keep watching (19/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I've been watching Home Depot for some time, and almost daily over the last 45 days. Over the last few weeks it almost seems like their stock continues to increase by a dollar or two almost every day... I keep saying oh I'm going to invest... But instead I stick to my tech based companies, like Apple, Microsoft and some others... or VTI to keep it safe. Let's be honest, home depot isn't going anywhere, they have a strong hold on the market with respect to lumber, home renovations materials for contractors and the every day DIYers... They have an excellent balance sheet and great financials... So ultimate question, is it too late? Wait for a significant dip then invest? Or invest now? Or keep watching? Would love your folks opinion on home depot and long term growth....   submitted by   /u/raviman8 [link]   [comments]
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  50. How I’d invest my first £1k in UK shares (13/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The stock market can be a daunting place for first-time investors. There are 100 blue-chip UK shares in the FTSE 100 and a further 250 companies in FTSE 250. On top of these, there are around 600 stocks that make up the FTSE All-Share. This index includes both the FTSE 100 and FTSE 250. But that’s just a section of the market. In total, there are more than 2,000 stocks listed in London. That excludes investment funds. With so many options to choose from, it can be almost impossible for beginners to decide where to start.  So if I had £1,000 to make my first investment in UK shares, I’d keep things simple. Rather than trying to find stocks to buy in the FTSE All-Share, I’d stick to the FTSE 100.  UK shares to buy  The highly successful investor and fund manager Peter Lynch suggests investors should only buy stocks in businesses they’re familiar with. As such, I’d only buy FTSE 100 stocks for my portfolio of UK shares that are household names.  The first stock I’d buy is BT. I’m excited about the outlook for this telecoms giant. As the firm invests more in its operations and builds out its fibre broadband network, I reckon earnings will return to growth. This growth could support a substantial dividend from the business, although there’s no guarantee this will happen.  Another household name I’d buy for my portfolio of UK shares is Royal Mail. This company has benefited from a surge in demand for its parcel delivery services over the past 12 months. The enterprise is planning to use these windfall profits to invest in its operations, which is the right choice, in my view. By reinvesting profits, the firm can build on last year’s expansion, and that may translate into earnings growth in the years ahead. The investment could also help the company compete more effectively with competitors, which are constantly nipping at its heels. This is the most significant challenge the enterprise faces right now.  Another household name I’d buy for my portfolio is Just Eat Takeaway. This is one of the handful of tech shares in the FTSE 100. Like Royal Mail, the company experienced strong growth last year as the pandemic confined consumers to their homes. The group now plans to use its own windfall profits to improve awareness of its brand. However, this may not lead to growth as its deep-pocketed competitors, such as Uber Eats, are also doing the same. Diversified portfolio By acquiring the three UK shares outlined above, I think I can build a well-diversified portfolio across different sectors. All three companies are also experiencing strong growth and have plans to increase their footprints in the months and years ahead. When coupled with the UK economic recovery, I think these twin tailwinds could lead to solid returns.  However, investing in equities can be risky, so this strategy might not suit all investors. Especially considering the risks facing these particular businesses. The post How I’d invest my first £1k in UK shares appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading UK shares to buy: 1 stock I’d acquire today How Warren Buffett’s advice could help me invest £1k How I’d invest £5k in cheap UK dividend shares Penny stocks: 3 UK shares I’d buy now Bargain or bust: will the Petrofac share price bounce back? Rupert Hargreaves owns no share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Just Eat Takeaway.com N.V. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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