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19 September 2021
13:46 hour

I believe these 2 FTSE 100 giants are good value right now!

The Motley Fool UK

14/09/2021 - 16:19

Jabran Khan identifies two FTSE 100 giants that he believes could see a share price increase and positive fortunes ahead. The post I believe these 2 FTSE 100 giants are good value right now! appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.


READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON THE MOTLEY FOOL UK

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  1. Investing Lessons Through My Son (21/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Three years ago this week as an early 1st birthday present for my son I opened up a custodial fractional share account for my son. The goal isn’t necessarily going out and getting profits intentionally, moreso buying good companies, letting the dividends reinvest and building himself a decent nest egg for when he graduates/moves out. There’s five stocks from that class of 2018, and here’s how they’re doing so far: Deere, +147.61% Microsoft, +138.41% Nike, +92% Starbucks, +72% Apple, +670% (The split messed with this some) He’s also up 69% (Nice), in the three years. He knows about the portfolio and I’ve explained it in terms he can understand (i.e. He’s a San Francisco Giants fan, and he owns Comcast stock. Comcast and the Giants co-own the channel Giants have games on, so he’s an indirect partner with the Giants.) I know a lot of times the market can be very much promoting the hare in the grand scheme of things, but tortoises do well too.   submitted by   /u/mnpeanut [link]   [comments]
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  2. Need to Know: Here’s what the tech giants have proved to their cynics — so what should investors do now? (30/04/2021 - Market Watch)
    The tech giants appear to be thriving, even as the economy opens up from the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions.
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  3. London Markets: Oil and banks weigh on FTSE 100, which heads for a solid August gain (31/08/2021 - Market Watch)
    On the last trading day of the month, London's main index was being dragged by losses for banks and energy giants.
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  4. : China is cracking down on its own tech giants, but Apple and the U.S. IPO market could pay the price (08/07/2021 - Market Watch)
    When Chinese authorities swiftly shut down one of its country's most popular apps in an antitrust crackdown, there were immediate debilitating consequences for Chinese companies already trading in the U.S. But the longer term ramifications of the move could sting the U.S. IPO market as well as American tech giants like Apple Inc.
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  5. London Markets: Rio Tinto stock falls amid iron ore weakness, as mining giants drag London stocks lower (21/06/2021 - Market Watch)
    Rio Tinto and other mining giants dragged stocks in London lower on Monday, amid fears that commodity prices were near the top of a cycle and weakness in both iron ore and copper.
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  6. China's Didi to be added to FTSE's equity indexes (01/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    good news China's Didi to be added to FTSE's equity indexes https://www.marketscreener.com/quote/stock/TENCENT-HOLDINGS-LIMITED-3045861/news/China-s-Didi-to-be-added-to-FTSE-s-equity-indexes-on-July-8-35761444/   submitted by   /u/galkale [link]   [comments]
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  7. Big Tech $100 Billion Foreign-Profit Hoard Targeted by Tax Plan (22/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/big-tech-100-billion-foreign-110000826.html "Technology giants led by Apple Inc. and Microsoft Corp. disclosed more than $100 billion in profit outside the U.S. in their last fiscal years, making them prime targets of President Joe Biden’s proposals to boost taxes on earnings stashed overseas." Looks like Biden will go after the tech giants heavily with the changes in taxes. What does everyone think?   submitted by   /u/Deathmod2 [link]   [comments]
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  8. Visa and Mastercard involvement in fintech? (23/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Visa and Mastercard are considered by many as very solid dependable blue chip, both paying dividends while having really good growth. I am just curious how they are innovating or are involved in fintech. I know for investing in fintech, people usually think of paypal or square and although I dont know specifically what Visa and mastercard are doing in relation to fintech, I cant imagining those giants are not involved in fintech in some way.   submitted by   /u/AronwithoneA [link]   [comments]
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  9. For bank regulators, tech giants are now too big to fail (20/08/2021 - Investing.com)

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  10. Oil giants grope for next steps after day of devastating defeats (27/05/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  11. Question about indexes. (13/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Hello, To keep things short - is it a good idea to half my investment in the FTSE 100 and buy into an index for the S&P 500 just for stability? I was also thinking of getting into an emerging markets index. ​ Also, what about world index trackers? Would it be better to sell my FTSE/S&P stock and buy all into that to keep the majority of my money in? ​ I've been stock picking a while but I don't have enough time to monitor and work with my account anymore so I figured it'd be better to dump it into an index and focus on school for now.   submitted by   /u/ColtAzayaka [link]   [comments]
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  12. Weekly Comic: What Next After a Smoking for China's Tech Giants? (24/08/2021 - Investing.com)

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  13. China could establish JV with tech giants to regulate data collection (24/03/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  14. Macquarie boosts ad giants, seeing industry recovery in full swing (04/05/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  15. EU pressing tech giants for more action against monetizing disinformation - Reuters (19/05/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  16. Pandemic inflicts off-pitch losses on soccer giants Man Utd, Juventus (17/09/2021 - Investing.com)

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  17. Looking to do my First Investment, thinking of a Global Index Fund - do any not have monthly minimums? (15/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    So I’m gonna start by saying i am a newbie when it comes to investing, I’m looking for something on the safe side that I can make investments in when I have a few hundred to spare every so often, looking for something long term. I’m starting university in September so when I looked at Vanguards FTSE Global All Cap Index Fund, the 500 starting ‘deposit’ is fine but the 100 monthly minimum worries me a little, what would happen if I wasn’t able to make the 100 minimum one month? Are they any alternatives to look at? I’m U.K. based if that helps. I’m not 100% set on the vanguard FTSE fund but from the reseach I’ve done it seems that investing in a global fund would be safer than s&p500 or FTSE 100, any advice or help would be appreciated! I’m going to be getting about £4k soon so I’m looking to invest a good chunk of that. What would I be looking at in 10 years or so if the market follows the current/previous trends? Many thanks!   submitted by   /u/kitaisaradish [link]   [comments]
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  18. Key chip supplier on path to full production as auto giants wait (01/06/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  19. Detroit auto giants expect strong truck and SUV demand even as EV transition plays out (16/08/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  20. China directs tech giants to de-link financial services from payment apps - WSJ (30/04/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  21. Grayscale Becomes First NFL Team Sponsor in New Partnership With the NY Giants (05/05/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  22. Smaller Communications names take place among giants atop sector's Quant Ratings (06/06/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  23. Price hikes remain in spotlight with more consumer staples giants set to report: Sector Watch (25/04/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  24. Tech Stock Drivers: DoorDash, Airbnb, and lidar sensor giants report earnings (08/05/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  25. China’s ‘Small Giants’ Lure Investors Hunting for Big Returns (27/06/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  26. In fresh regulatory move, China tells tech giants to stop blocking rivals' links (13/09/2021 - Investing.com)

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  27. Why I’d buy top FTSE 100 stocks now and aim to hold them for a decade (15/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    I’d never buy any shares that I didn’t intend to hold for at least 10 years, and that also applies to top FTSE 100 stocks too. In the short run, how share prices will perform is anybody’s guess. Over the longer run however, the general trajectory is upwards. The longer the investment term, the lower the risk from investing. That’s because my holdings have more time to recover from a stock market crash. A longer horizon term also allows me to buy undervalued companies, then hold on throughout the market cycle and wait for them to recover. There are never guarantees when investing. Even the best investors in the world pick their share of duds. That’s why I’d invest in a broad spread of top FTSE 100 stocks, so if some underperform, others should more than compensate. I’d buy and hold top FTSE 100 stocks I find investing for the long term particularly comforting at times like these, when share prices are volatile and some are warning of a stock market crash. Nobody wants to invest in a stock, only for shares to crash next day. When that happens, even top FTSE 100 stocks will fall along with the weaker ones. However, with a long-term strategy, I should only suffer a paper loss. History shows that stock markets always recover, given time. Some companies have adapted to the pandemic, others have been found out. Those with outdated strategies or weak balance sheets will take longer to recover, if they ever do. Right now, I’d look for top FTSE 100 stocks that have shown long-term resilience, as this should stand them in good stead for the uncertainties ahead. Plenty of shares have performed strongly lately, including banking giants Barclays and Lloyds Banking Group, retailer Next, oil giants BP and Royal Dutch Shell, and housebuilder Barratt Developments. Anglo American, Rio Tinto, JD Sports Fashion and many others have also done well. Investors have piled into these top FTSE 100 stocks, believing they’ll lead the recovery once lockdown is over. There are still plenty of undervalued opportunities out there. Household goods giant Unilever has underperformed. So has GlaxoSmithKline. Also Standard Life Aberdeen. These are the type of stocks I’d be looking to buy now. While they all face challenges, they remain top FTSE 100 stocks that should deliver attractive long-term share price growth and dividend income over the longer run. A lot now depends on how the recovery goes. The UK’s vaccine rollout has been a success and let’s hope it sees off mutant Covid variations. There are dangers, as always. If global stimulus triggers inflation, this could slow growth. The US stock market is looking somewhat frothy. There will always be black swan events. But by focusing my firepower on top FTSE 100 stocks and buying for the long term, I hope to shrug off these short-term worries. These companies tempt me. 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50 Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic… And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains. But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times. Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down… You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm. That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away. Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! More reading A UK share I own in my ISA, and another British stock I’m thinking of buying The Carnival share price is rising. Should I buy? The Robert Walters share price is rising. Should I buy? The Helium One share price is up 200%! Should I buy now? Should I buy National Grid shares at the current price? Harvey Jones has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Why I’d buy top FTSE 100 stocks now and aim to hold them for a decade appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  28. Opinion About CNR (CNI) and its new likely merger with KCS (27/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    The two big canadian railroads giants have been fighting over Kansas City Southern for a couple months. Now it looks like CNR will be the one who is gonna merge is KCS. I invite you guys to check out this picture, of the rail road maps: https://www.trains.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/CN-KCS-map.png As you can see, this merger will make CNR a major player in international trade. The coverage looks incredible to me. You have access to both oceans in both north and south hemisphere. The downside is that it will cost around 33.6 billion C$ to CNR for the merger. To me this looks like a strong bullish event but only for the longterm (5+ years). What do you guys think about the merger? Is it good/bad ? Are you staying away from canadian stocks?   submitted by   /u/TheFriendlyTaco [link]   [comments]
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  29. Many Experts Questioned Why The Tech Giants Like Musk And Dorsey Thinks Bitcoin Is More Environmentally Friendly (27/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  30. For big share dividends, I’m looking to buy into these 12 FTSE 100 giants! (18/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Last week, I wrote about how UK share dividends slumped in 2020, crashing by a massive £50.7bn. After Covid-19 restrictions arrived last March, many companies decided to cut, cancel or suspend their shareholder payouts. However, with mass vaccinations under way and lockdowns to be relaxed eventually, company earnings may rebound. A number of FTSE 100 heavyweights should return to paying regular dividends. And that’s good news for dividend investors and lovers of passive income like me. Share dividends to recover in 2021? I’m very hopeful that UK share dividends will bounce back this year, not least because I have a windfall to invest. In a couple of months, I will put another £300,000+ in cash to work in our family portfolio. I hope for this lump sum to generate an annual passive income of £12,000+. That’s a modest income yield of 4% a year — something that can be generated by high-yielding FTSE 100 shares. And with investment firm A J Bell predicting total UK dividends of £70.8bn this year, I want to grab my fair share for my family. The biggest dividends come from the largest businesses Not every UK-listed company pays dividends. In fact, most don’t and instead reinvest their profits into growth. As a result, UK share dividends are extremely concentrated, with the lion’s share being paid by a handful of global giants. In fact, more than half of this year’s dividends will come from just 12 Footsie heavyweights. Right now, I’m worried that US stocks are in a bubble phase, making them too expensive for me. I’ve decided to reduce my portfolio risk by investing heavily in boring, reliable British businesses. Ideally, I’m on the lookout for lowly rated UK stocks that pay generous share dividends. The 12 Goliaths of the FTSE 100 With warning signs of investor mania and market madness emerging, I prefer to invest in businesses that I think should be able to ride out any storm. For example, these 12 FTSE 100 firms all have market values above £40bn, making them among the biggest payers of UK share dividends. I’ve also added the forecast 2020 dividend for each share. Company | Market value | 2020 forecast dividend Royal Dutch Shell |£109.3bn | £4.2bn Unilever |£105.3bn | £3.9bn AstraZeneca £96.3bn | £2.8bn HSBC Holdings | £87.1bn | £1.3bn Rio Tinto | £78.1bn | £4.0bn Diageo | £71.2bn | £1.6bn GlaxoSmithKline | £64.0bn | £4.0bn British American Tobacco | £63.1bn | £4.9bn BP | £56.6bn | £4.4bn BHP Group | £47.7bn | £1.9bn London Stock Exchange Group | £46.0bn | £0.3bn Reckitt Benckiser Group | £44.9bn | £1.2bn I want my share of 2021’s share dividends The total market value of these dozen giants comes to just short of £870bn. That’s close to half of the market capitalisation of the FTSE 100. And these 12 stocks’ combined cash dividends for 2020 come to a whopping £34.5bn. That’s close to half of all the dividends expected to be paid by Footsie firms for that year. As a value investor seeking bumper dividends, I’m attracted to these dividend dynamos. Who wouldn’t want to share in almost £3bn a month of regular cash payments? That’s why my future focus will be on investing in several of these. This should help me to generate a passive income. And I’ll be making full use of tax-free Stocks and Shares ISAs and pensions to capture these bumper dividends. Bit I always remember that company dividends aren’t guaranteed. They can fall or be cancelled without notice, as we gloomily discovered in 2020. 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50 Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic… And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains. But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times. Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down… You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm. That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away. Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! More reading The Rolls-Royce share price is rising this week. Should I buy? 2 of the best shares to buy now Are JD Wetherspoon’s shares poised to benefit from the Covid recovery? Baillie Gifford Pacific Fund: 4 reasons why I’d buy today Londoners: do you know about March 2021’s TfL fare rise? Cliffdarcy owns shares in GlaxoSmithKline. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Diageo, GlaxoSmithKline, HSBC Holdings, and Unilever. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool, we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post For big share dividends, I’m looking to buy into these 12 FTSE 100 giants! appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  31. Discussion on the semiconductor giants [AMD, INTC, NVDA] (20/05/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    It's no surprise that these semiconductors have done well over the past few years. Although these companies will have mild corrections, I think it's safe to say they will have a big impact on the technology driven future. With that said, I'd like to get peoples opinions on the pros and cons of each of these companies. What products do they offer? How is one better than the other? Will the function/price ratios of their product be cyclic or will there be a clear winner? Just to bring up a few. Here is some quick information on these companies: NVDA: Company focuses on GPUs. Has a great GPU for both gaming and crypto. GPUs thrive in crypto and Neural Networks (AI). MC~350B, EV/EBITDA~60, low debt, good growth AMD: Has made a huge push in the CPU niche and has gained popularity with the gamers. Their CPUs are valued at the best function/price ratio. Pretty sure they are working on a promising GPU. MC~90B, EV/EBITDA~40, low debt, good growth INTC: The most experience and clout in the industry. Look around you, you'll probably see an intel sticker. Recent restructure of company with seems promising. Heavy in the DB and cloud niche which will be massive in the future (and currently is). Also, working on GPUs, not sure on the progress. MC~223, EV/EBITDA~6.7, debt, could have less, good growth ​ At first glance the cheapest to most expensive from a valuation standpoint looks as followed INTC, AMD, NVDA, respectively. Looking forward to the responses!   submitted by   /u/Revolutionary-Cry-38 [link]   [comments]
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  32. Why isn’t the FTSE 100 over 8,000? I blame these 3 problems! (07/09/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The FTSE 100 is the UK’s largest stock-market index. It accounts for roughly four-fifths (80%) of London’s overall valuation. The Footsie’s 101 stocks (one is dual-listed) have a combined market value exceeding £2trn. But London’s blue-chip index has been a big disappointment over the past 21 years. Here’s why. The FTSE 100 is a flop On Millennium Eve (31 December 1999), the FTSE 100 hit a record closing high of 6,930.2 points. But then it crashed, more than halving by March 2003. Then it bounced back, before collapsing again during the global financial crisis of 2007/09. And since March 2009, it’s bounced and bumped for 12 years to reach current levels. Today, the FTSE 100 stands at 7,173.35 points, gaining under 250 points  — a mere 3.4% — in 21 years (excluding dividends). That’s an awful return for over two decades of global growth. The Footsie is also over 700 points — nearly a tenth (8.9%) — below its all-time closing high of 7,877.45 on 22 May 2018. Why has London’s index done so poorly and failed to break the 8,000 mark? The 20th century’s index? While the US S&P 500 index keeps hitting record highs in 2021, the FTSE 100 has gained only a ninth (11.1%) this year. One reason for this might be that global investors see the Footsie as an old-fashioned, decidedly 20th century index. For sure, the FTSE 100 index is packed with cheap, value, and cyclical stocks. These include banks, miners, and oil & gas producers — among the index’s biggest sectors. And given the dramatic collapse in these stocks during the Covid-19 crash of early 2020, it’s no wonder the Footsie has taken a beating. Also, with the world inexorably moving towards a future of low carbon, clean energy, and digital working, who would bet on these old-school shares? Mega-cap companies dominate the FTSE 100 Both the S&P 500 and FTSE 100 are dominated by a handful of what I call ‘power stocks’. In the US, a clutch of mega-cap high-tech firms have driven the wider market ever higher since March 2020’s market meltdown. These huge tech giants enjoy growth rates that large UK companies can only imagine. Hence, investors are willing to pay top dollar to buy into these highly rated US market leaders. Here in the UK, a few big names also drive the direction of the overall market. Unfortunately, the UK’s giants are in unloved sectors such as financial services, basic resources, and fossil fuels. Indeed, six of the FTSE 100’s 10 largest members fall into these three categories. And who wants to own boring giants like banks and oil firms, when by buying expensive electric vehicle stocks you can own the future? A Brexit discount? The last explanation is that UK stocks are unfairly under-priced due to a perceived Brexit discount. Although it’s clear that leaving the European Union has already negatively impacted the UK economy, I’m not entirely convinced by this argument. After all, at least three-quarters (75%) of FTSE 100 earnings come from overseas. Hence, a weakening pound would make these foreign earnings more valuable in pounds sterling, not less. To sum up, I think the lack of tech stocks, focus on old-school sectors, and the Covid-19 pandemic have hit UK stocks harder than most. But I see the FTSE 100 today as offering great value, especially to income investors hunting high dividends, like me. While global investors pay eye-popping prices to buy quality and growth stocks, I’ll keep buying cheap UK stocks for their long-term value! The post Why isn’t the FTSE 100 over 8,000? I blame these 3 problems! appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Inflation Is Coming: 3 Shares To Try And Hedge Against Rising Prices Make no mistake… inflation is coming. Some people are running scared, but there’s one thing we believe we should avoid doing at all costs when inflation hits… and that’s doing nothing. Money that just sits in the bank can often lose value each and every year. But to savvy savers and investors, where to consider putting their money is the million-dollar question. That’s why we’ve put together a brand-new special report that uncovers 3 of our top UK and US share ideas to try and best hedge against inflation… …because no matter what the economy is doing, a savvy investor will want their money working for them, inflation or not! Best of all, we’re giving this report away completely FREE today! Simply click here, enter your email address, and we’ll send it to you right away. More reading E10 fuel: is my car compatible? Is the Lloyds share price destined for disaster? Is the Sainsbury share price about to explode? How I’m using dividends to generate a monthly passive income Is the Avacta (AVCT) share price about to explode? Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services, such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool, we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  33. Here’s how I’m preparing for the next stock market crash (14/09/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    If we can learn one lesson from Benjamin Graham’s Intelligent Investor, it’s this: buy stocks cheaply. At the moment, his advice is proving difficult to follow. The S&P 500, despite America’s coronavirus complications, inflation worries and foreign policy blunders, still marches around record highs. The index is crammed with heavy blue-chip tech stocks and an enormous amount of government stimulus, both of which complement its ever-rising valuation. But we knew all of this already. In the last few days, though, it has wobbled for a different reason, and this could be signalling the dreaded correction that has loomed in the background behind 2021’s remarkable bull run. The reason? Experts are worried. It is often said that the market runs on emotion, and rumours are beginning to circle around Wall Street that a crash may occur before the end of the year – here, fear spreads like fire. While it’s generally advised to ignore the daily hubbub of the market in favour of long-term gains, here at The Motley Fool we aim to avoid crises before they happen (and of course, make the most of fire sales). With that in mind, here’s my strategy that I’m organising before the market corrects. Like many others, each month I buy a portion of the S&P 500 tracker fund. I’m planning to cut my payment right down to the bare minimum, opting instead to purchase the relatively fairer-valued FTSE All-Share Index. Why? I believe the US tech stocks are at the greatest risk of correction in a market crash, while the UK (for better or worse) lacks any of these giants. The FTSE All-Share, unlike the S&P, has not experienced the same scale of rapid growth since 2020 and so should be shielded from the worst effects of a downturn – in effect, there’s less to lose. This is only a temporary measure, but at present I don’t want to continue overpaying for American stocks if their value is going to wipe out soon. Somewhat counterintuitively, it is also helpful to think of stock market crashes as flash sales. Warren Buffett has always styled himself as a ‘net buyer’ of stocks with a ‘holding period of forever’. Like any other product, then, paying at a discount is always encouraged. Stock market crashes provide brief periods of remarkable purchasing opportunity amidst a wider climate of pessimism, and for this reason I am keeping holding back some cash in order to pounce on the next dip and seize my desired companies from the bargain bucket. Going against the grain of popular opinion can be a great way to make money in the market, and when the world is telling me to sell, I will turn my headphones up louder and purchase more stocks. Bring it on! The post Here’s how I’m preparing for the next stock market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Our #1 North American Stock For The ‘New-Age Space Race’ Billionaires like Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and Mark Zuckerberg are already betting big money on the ‘new-age space race’, and for one very good reason… …because this is an industry that according to Morgan Stanley could be worth $1 TRILLION by 2040. But the problem is most of their investments are in private companies — meaning they’re largely off-limits for everyday investors. Fortunately, our team of analysts have identified one little-known company that’s at the cutting-edge of the space industry, and is currently trading at what looks like a VERY reasonable valuation… …for now. That’s why I want to urge you to check out our premium research on this top North American space stock ASAP. Simply click here to see find out how you can grab your copy today More reading Here’s how I identify my best stocks to buy now & 1 pick I like! £1K to invest? Here’s 1 FTSE 250 stock I would buy now! Is the Lloyds (LLOY) share price a bargain or a value trap? I believe these 2 FTSE 100 giants are good value right now! Here’s how I think the UK economy will perform for the rest of 2021 Joseph Wilkins owns shares in a S&P 500 tracker fund. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  34. : Pfizer argues its case in federal court for helping seniors meet drug copays (23/06/2021 - Market Watch)
    Lawsuit tests anti-kickback law that has snared pharmaceutical giants.
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  35. London Markets: FTSE 100 tops 7,000 for the first time in over a year after upbeat Chinese data (16/04/2021 - Market Watch)
    The FTSE 100 hasn't tapped the 7,000 mark since February 2020.
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  36. What solid stocks with good growth/financials are currently oversold based on news that is good but not as good as expected? (07/09/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Just like the title says, i know there are instances where stocks get sold off on good news that is not necessarily as good as expected...wondering if any of you have thoughts or suggestions to currently look into? thanks   submitted by   /u/ArnoldisKing [link]   [comments]
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  37. Didi to be added to S&P Dow Jones' indexes (02/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Yesterday we got the news that Didi to be added to FTSE's equity indexes https://www.marketscreener.com/quote/stock/TENCENT-HOLDINGS-LIMITED-3045861/news/China-s-Didi-to-be-added-to-FTSE-s-equity-indexes-on-July-8-35761444/ and today more good news Didi to be added to S&P Dow Jones' indexes https://www.reuters.com/business/chinas-didi-be-added-sp-dow-jones-indexes-july-12-2021-07-02/ any thoughts?   submitted by   /u/galkale [link]   [comments]
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  38. Would investing in NLE be a good idea? (03/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Do you think investing in NLE is a good idea? I’ve been getting into investing in the stock market a good bit recently. I’ve enjoyed my time doing it. I’ve made a good deal of profit so far and want to continue. My friends and I have been talking about NLE. We’ve been hearing good things about it and think it might blow up soon. I am thinking about investing a large amount of money into this but I need a second opinion on this though. It is currently on the rise and i have a very good feeling and prediction that it will blow up massively in the coming weeks. Thoughts?   submitted by   /u/humongisgchungus [link]   [comments]
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  39. London Markets: BHP keeps FTSE 100 in positive territory (17/08/2021 - Market Watch)
    BHP Group plc kept the FTSE 100 in the green on Tuesday, after the mining giant set out a plan to consolidate its two classes of shares into a single structure.
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  40. ISA millionaires are buying these FTSE 100 stocks today (25/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    I’ve always believed FTSE 100 stocks are a great way to build my wealth, but I didn’t realise how good. New research shows there are thousands of ISA millionaires in the UK, and they’ve loaded up with shares on the index. Hargreaves Lansdown reports 579 ISA millionaires on its platform, and they’re big on dividend-paying FTSE 100 stocks. Oil giants BP and Royal Dutch Shell, pharmaceutical companies AstraZeneca and GlaxoSmithKline, financials Lloyds Banking Group, Legal & General Group and Aviva, and National Grid, Unilever and Vodafone Group make up their top 10 picks. They all come with company-specific and sector risks, of course, but I’d buy them.  I’d buy these FTSE 100 stocks Perhaps that isn’t surprising. When you aggregate 579 different ISA portfolios, it’s inevitable that big, popular FTSE 100 stocks will appear more frequently. However, it’s still a worthwhile reminder that investing in solid blue-chips is a great way to build wealth. These giants may not always deliver stellar share price growth, but their dividends can roll up year after year. That’s not guaranteed though, and all share investing includes the risk of losing money too. That’s why it’s interesting that the data also shows ISA millionaires ‘play it safe’. They’re less likely to hold the most risky FTSE 100 stocks, such as airlines and hotel groups, that may not make it through the pandemic. In other words, they didn’t need to make big calls or take excessive risks to build a million. Platform AJ Bell has also published its ISA millionaire data and this shows they prefer individual shares to funds. An incredible 83% of their portfolios are in stocks, but just 14% in pooled funds. It said those with larger sums can afford to take the higher risks of investing in individual equities, because they have assets to diversify appropriately. The average number of investments held by AJ Bell’s ISA millionaires is 28. ISA millionaires are putting their eggs in lots of different baskets (partly because they have so many eggs). Becoming an ISA millionaire takes time Again, they focus on FTSE 100 stocks. Most of the ones I’ve listed above also feature, as well as HSBC Holdings, Tesco and Unilever. Here’s another interesting fact. The average Hargreaves Lansdown ISA millionaire is 71, while at AJ Bell, it’s 69. This reminds me of something I’ve said on the Fool, again and again. The best way to build wealth from FTSE 100 stocks is over the long term. The stock market isn’t a get-rich-quick mechanism. Instead, it can make me wealthy slowly. That’s why I wouldn’t wait too long before starting investing if I was a beginner today. I wouldn’t do anything clever like trying to time the market either. I think the best thing for me to do is put money into FTSE 100 stocks. And leave it there. I don’t expect to come close to being an ISA millionaire, but I do plan to build my own retirement wealth in a similar way. By investing in a spread of shares (and funds for overseas exposure) and leaving my money to grow for the long term. I’m talking decades here. This opportunity tempts me. A Top Share with Enormous Growth Potential Savvy investors like you won’t want to miss out on this timely opportunity… Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK analyst all fired up about this ‘pure-play’ online business (yes, despite the pandemic!). Not only does this company enjoy a dominant market-leading position… But its capital-light, highly scalable business model has previously helped it deliver consistently high sales, astounding near-70% margins, and rising shareholder returns … in fact, in 2019 it returned a whopping £150m+ to shareholders in dividends and buybacks! And here’s the really exciting part… While COVID-19 may have thrown the company a curveball, management have acted swiftly to ensure this business is as well placed as it can be to ride out the current period of uncertainty… in fact, our analyst believes it should come roaring back to life, just as soon as normal economic activity resumes. That’s why we think now could be the perfect time for you to start building your own stake in this exceptional business – especially given the shares look to be trading on a fairly undemanding valuation for the year to March 2021. Click here to claim your copy of this special report now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Growth Share… free of charge! More reading Why the vegan market is set to double in just 5 years Should I buy these two FTSE 100 UK shares on merger rumours? This is why the Aston Martin share price has spiked 10%! Stock market rally! 5 reasons why I’m buying UK shares today UK stock investing: the best FTSE 100 growth share to buy now Harvey Jones has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended GlaxoSmithKline, HSBC Holdings, Lloyds Banking Group, Tesco, and Unilever. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post ISA millionaires are buying these FTSE 100 stocks today appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  41. 3 reasons why the FTSE 100 is crashing (19/08/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Having enjoyed a good few weeks of positive momentum, the FTSE 100 index has fallen heavily this morning. As I type, London’s top tier is down 2.2%. While that may not seem like much compared to the market crash of March 2020, it’s still enough to raise the eyebrows of even the most sanguine of investors. Let’s look at a few reasons why this might be happening. FTSE 100: what’s going on? Perhaps the most prominent of these is news that the Federal Reserve is considering pulling back on its stimulus support for the US economy. It’s not so much that this is a surprise to global markets as it was always on the cards, given rising inflation across the pond. Consumer prices hit a 13-year high in June.  No, what’s got traders in a twist is how quickly this tapering might happen. Right now, there’s speculation this could occur in the last quarter of this year or the first quarter of 2022. Some seem to think this may be too soon given that recent data has shown consumers are still behaving cautiously. As always, the markets hate uncertainty and US indices fell yesterday. Seen from this perspective, the FTSE 100 is merely playing catch-up. Covid-19 concerns Another reason for the lead index having a rough morning is news of rising Covid-19 infection levels around the world. Aside from the health implications, this has a knock-on effect on other things.  One example of this is the price of oil. This has been steadily falling for a few days on fears that the Delta variant may put economic activity into reverse and demand for fuel will follow. This is, after all, what happened last year as stockpiles jumped amid widespread lockdowns.  A reversal in the price of oil is clearly not great news for FTSE 100 giants Royal Dutch Shell and BP. Due to their relative size, they have a bigger impact on the direction of the index than those lower down.  Ex-dividend day An additional, a more benign explanation for why the FTSE 100 is struggling relates to a good number of its constituents going ex-dividend. This is when a stock trades without the value of its next dividend payment. In other words, investors who purchased a stake in these companies before today will now receive the next cash payout, while those buying today won’t. Given that the FTSE 100 remains a great hunting ground for big dividends, it was always possible this could have an impact on today’s performance. The timing just isn’t great. Should Fools worry? A sudden drop in the FTSE 100 like we’re experiencing today can test the nerves. It’s never pleasant to see many/all of one’s holdings fall in value. Personally, I’m not worried. Counter-intuitively, it’s the days where individual stocks that I own are crashing that make me jittery. When pretty much the whole market falls in unison, I can be pretty sure that the underlying businesses that I own haven’t changed all that much. In spite of today’s tumble, it’s also worth remembering that the FTSE 100 is almost 15% above where it stood in August 2020.  As a long-term investor, I know that one of the best things to do in times of trouble is to get greedy. So, if I’m going to do anything today, it will be to take another look at my wishlist of UK stocks.  The post 3 reasons why the FTSE 100 is crashing appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Inflation Is Coming: 3 Shares To Try And Hedge Against Rising Prices Make no mistake… inflation is coming. Some people are running scared, but there’s one thing we believe we should avoid doing at all costs when inflation hits… and that’s doing nothing. Money that just sits in the bank can often lose value each and every year. But to savvy savers and investors, where to consider putting their money is the million-dollar question. That’s why we’ve put together a brand-new special report that uncovers 3 of our top UK and US share ideas to try and best hedge against inflation… …because no matter what the economy is doing, a savvy investor will want their money working for them, inflation or not! Best of all, we’re giving this report away completely FREE today! Simply click here, enter your email address, and we’ll send it to you right away. More reading Is the BP share price about to explode? Will climate change send the Royal Dutch Shell share price to zero? 3 of the best shares to buy now for income Can the BP share price rise further? Is BP’s shareholder dividend safe? Paul Summers has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  42. The best shares to buy now in the FTSE 100 (20/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    When it comes to finding investments, I think the FTSE 100 is a great place to start. With that in mind, here are some of the best shares to buy now in this blue-chip index, according to my research. FTSE 100 opportunities I’ve been looking to buy companies that may benefit from the global economic recovery over the past few months. I’ve settled on two businesses I believe are well-positioned to profit from the rally. Anglo American and BHP are mining giants. I think they should benefit from the growing demand for commodities around the world as the economy reopens. And the businesses are already reporting a significant increase in profitability. Commodity prices have jumped over the past 12 months. I think this trend will continue. If prices don’t increase, I believe they’ll remain high for the foreseeable future as demand remains elevated.  Of course, commodity prices can fall just as fast as they rise. With that being the case, these companies aren’t for the faint-hearted. If the economic recovery starts to splutter, commodity prices could crumble, which would lead to falling sales and revenues at both Anglo-American and BHP.  Considering these risks, I think they’re the best shares to buy now… but only as part of a diversified portfolio.  Best shares to buy now As well as the economic recovery plays outlined above, I’d also buy companies with a strong track record of being able to operate through all economic environments.  FTSE 100 growth stocks Bunzl and Halma both tick this box. The distribution and health and safety businesses operate in two relatively defensive industries. Even in the worst economic environments, health and safety will always be a core consideration for companies. The same is true of distribution. Even in an economic downturn, customers will want to have products available to sell to clients. As well as the defensive nature of these companies, they also have a good track record of buying growth through small acquisitions.  These two factors are the main reasons why I believe they’re the best shares to buy now. When owned in a diversified portfolio, I think they’ll produce steady returns for investors, no matter what the future holds for the global economy. However, they’re not risk-free. A strategy based on acquisitions can, and has, hurt many a business who has overpaid in the search for growth. What’s more, the strategy could also build elevated levels of debt. Both of these could be headwinds, hindering growth in the long run. But despite these risks and potential challenges, I’d buy the stocks for a diversified portfolio of FTSE 100 shares today. When combined with the economic recovery plays outlined above, I think this could make the perfect portfolio for the next few years.  There’s a ‘double agent’ hiding in the FTSE… we recommend you buy it! Don’t miss our special stock presentation. It contains details of a UK-listed company our Motley Fool UK analysts are extremely enthusiastic about. They think it’s offering an incredible opportunity to grow your wealth over the long term – at its current price – regardless of what happens in the wider market. That’s why they’re referring to it as the FTSE’s ‘double agent’. Because they believe it’s working both with the market… And against it. To find out why we think you should add it to your portfolio today… Click here to get access to our presentation, and learn how to get the name of this 'double agent'! More reading What is the gig economy? 2 FTSE 250 shares to buy right now 5 ways to reduce your carbon footprint and save money I’d buy and hold Tesco shares for the next 10 years Is FTSE 250 oil stock Petrofac a long-term investment or a share to avoid? Rupert Hargreaves owns no share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Halma. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The best shares to buy now in the FTSE 100 appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  43. FTSE 100 vs FTSE 250, which will end higher in 2021? (01/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Many years ago, I came across the old adage: “FTSE 100 for income, FTSE 250 for growth.” The idea is that growth companies make their way up through the FTSE 250, and finally reach the FTSE 100 where they mature and turn to paying bigger dividends. I often also hear the claim that the FTSE 250, perhaps as a result, tends to outpace the FTSE 100. That sounds plausible, if the smaller-cap index contains more growth companies. But wait, doesn’t the FTSE 250 lose out and fall back every time one of its stocks grows too big and makes it into the top index? I took a look back at the two indexes since their inception in 1984, and I was surprised by what I saw. To date, the FTSE 250 has indeed outstripped the FTSE 100. But it’s only a relatively recent phenomenon. Up until 2003, the two indexes were pretty much neck and neck. And only since then have the mid-cap companies of the FTSE 250 pulled ahead of their bigger cousins. FTSE 100 pulling back The two came close to convergence again by 2009, during the financial crisis. The UK’s top banking and insurance giants are all FTSE 100 companies. So there’s no real surprise that’s where the carnage happened. The ongoing weakness of the financial sector, being hit hard by Brexit and then by Covid-19, probably helps explain the rapid outperformance of the FTSE 250 since then. Climate change has likely played a part too, with big oil companies suffering. After all, the top of the index was long dominated by Shell, BP and the banks. But what’s been happening more recently? Well, the pandemic-driven stock market crash hit the FTSE 250 more heavily. But it’s already recovered more strongly and is back in the lead. Since mid-February 2020, we’re looking at a gain of 3% compared to a loss of 6% for the FTSE 100. Again, I can’t help thinking the banking factor has played a significant part. Without the banks, I think the two indexes would have been closer together. A strong FTSE 250 future? For the rest of 2021 and beyond? I can see financial sector weakness continuing. Barclays, with its wider international reach and its investment banking exposure, looks like being the exception. But the other big names are still suffering, and I reckon Brexit could weigh heavily on them for some time yet. The UK’s departure agreement might have secured tariff-free movement of goods, but it doesn’t cover services. I do think we could see the FTSE 250 beating the FTSE 100 again over the next few years. One thing a stock market meltdown can do is open up possibilities for smaller and more nimble companies. Brexit looks sure to bring changes in the UK economy, and that too could open up possibilities for smaller cap companies. I prefer to focus on individual companies, and I’ll buy what I think is a good stock no matter which index it’s in. Saying that, in the next few years, I think I could be seeing more attractive smaller companies than usual. A Top Share with Enormous Growth Potential Savvy investors like you won’t want to miss out on this timely opportunity… Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK analyst all fired up about this ‘pure-play’ online business (yes, despite the pandemic!). Not only does this company enjoy a dominant market-leading position… But its capital-light, highly scalable business model has previously helped it deliver consistently high sales, astounding near-70% margins, and rising shareholder returns … in fact, in 2019 it returned a whopping £150m+ to shareholders in dividends and buybacks! And here’s the really exciting part… While COVID-19 may have thrown the company a curveball, management have acted swiftly to ensure this business is as well placed as it can be to ride out the current period of uncertainty… in fact, our analyst believes it should come roaring back to life, just as soon as normal economic activity resumes. That’s why we think now could be the perfect time for you to start building your own stake in this exceptional business – especially given the shares look to be trading on a fairly undemanding valuation for the year to March 2021. Click here to claim your copy of this special report now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Growth Share… free of charge! More reading UK shares to buy for May: how I’d invest £2,000 today ‘Sell in May’ runs the risk of missing potential summer gains! 2 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy in May UK banking stocks: Investec shares jumped 30% in April! Should I buy now? Can Argo Blockchain shares keep climbing? Alan Oscroft has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Barclays. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post FTSE 100 vs FTSE 250, which will end higher in 2021? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  44. London Markets: ‘Freedom day’ flop for FTSE 100 as U.K. stocks retreat (19/07/2021 - Market Watch)
    The FTSE 100 dropped 2.7% in late-afternoon trade, putting the benchmark index on track for the worst session since Sept. 21, when it sank 3.4%.
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  45. London Markets: FTSE 100 headed for best weekly return since January (09/04/2021 - Market Watch)
    The FTSE 100 has outperformed its European rivals this week, thanks to the pound. Among stocks, Babcock International shares slid, while PageGroup surged on.
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  46. London Markets: FTSE 100 slumps as commodity producers struggle (19/08/2021 - Market Watch)
    A downturn in commodity prices blasted the FTSE 100 on Thursday.
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  47. Outside the Box: In the Epic vs. Apple court fight, there’s one clear winner (26/05/2021 - Market Watch)
    Apple has shown that its ecosystem is fair, while Epic is abusing the public pressure on tech giants.
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  48. 1 big macro risk to stock market investing and how I’d beat it (31/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The economy may be due for a rebound, but risks are showing up too. Like inflation. The good news is that this macro risk to stock market investing can be countered by making strategic buys, in my view.  Here’s how. Inflation fears makes a comeback I think this one was visible from a mile away. The run-up in stock markets, commodity prices, and even real estate since last year were already signs of asset price inflation. ‘Assets’ here refers to various investing classes.  And where there is sustained inflation in assets like industrial commodities, it gets built into expectations for inflation, since these are inputs for finished products. This is especially so if the economy itself is due for a growth bounceback. This can create demand pressure too.  Investing during high inflation Traditionally, gold is a good hedge against inflation as rising prices erode the real value of paper money. The nature of inflation this time, however, makes miners and oil companies a good investment. The reason is that these industries are on the right side of inflation. FTSE 100 industrial metals’ miners like Anglo American, BHP, Glencore, and Rio Tinto have benefited from the rise in prices as China’s government opened up the fiscal taps as it came out of the covid crisis. With the Biden government in the US set to do the same now, commodities could continue to rally. In fact, some even believe that we are at the start of a commodity supercycle. That may not be the best news for inflation, but it is for miners.  The oil play Oil prices are an important component of inflation because they have a second round impact. A rise in the price of fuel affects my travel costs. But it also affects the costs of goods I buy from the supermarket, because they too are being transported to the point of sale at a higher cost now. The gainers from rising oil prices, of course, are FTSE 100 oil giants like BP and Royal Dutch Shell. Their share prices have languished for some time now, but I think this could be the year when the trend changes.  Consider passive income Moreover, they also pay dividends. And going by the expected improvement in their performance, the dividends could also rise. This too, helps me as inflation rises.  If instead I had invested in a stock whose margins were squeezed because rising inflation was increasing costs, it would be more likely to cut dividends than increase them. This would mean that the value of my dividend would fall not just because of inflation but also in nominal terms.  If oil companies increase dividends, however, this makes up for some loss in the real value of money because of inflation.  A note of caution That said, each of these companies has individual issues to contend with. For Glencore, it is corruption charges, for Rio Tinto, it is the threat of strikes, and for oil companies, it is the struggle to go green, as examples. So I would choose from among these with care.  One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading Should I buy this FTSE 100 stock? FTSE 100: these were the 5 best shares to buy before Brexit in 2016! How to invest in the S&P 500 Why I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 defensive shares today The Deliveroo share price drops by 30%. Here’s what I’d do now Manika Premsingh owns shares of BP, Glencore, and Royal Dutch Shell B. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post 1 big macro risk to stock market investing and how I’d beat it appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  49. Asia Markets: China’s tech giants slammed for second day as Hang Seng dives (27/07/2021 - Market Watch)
    China's intensifying regulatory crackdown crushed tech stocks for a second day on Tuesday.
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