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19 September 2021
14:00 hour

Can the Ocado share price start rising again?

The Motley Fool UK

14/09/2021 - 15:10

Ocado is one of the biggest FTSE 100 losers in today’s trading after posting a weak trading update. Is this the dip to buy into or a red flag? The post Can the Ocado share price start rising again? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.


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  1. The Ocado share price: is this the beginning of another rally? (23/08/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    After surging in value at the start of the pandemic, the Ocado (LSE:OCDO) share price has struggled. Over the past year, it has dropped just over 20%. For a while now, I’ve steered clear of the company, given the falling share price and steep valuation. However, with the shares rising 7% last month, could this be the start of another rally for the business? Gains during the pandemic At the start of the pandemic, it was clear why Ocado could benefit. The online grocery retailer had the perfect logistics and website set-up to deliver to people stuck at home. Lockdowns meant that even if people could go to supermarkets, many preferred to stay at home for safety. This meant that the Ocado share price doubled in value over the course of 2020. Even before we came into 2021, it became apparent to me that the valuation of Ocado was becoming stretched. In November of last year, I wrote about the £19.3bn valuation that the company had at the time. This was when the share price was around 2,600p (it’s under 2,000p today). By comparison, other supermarket chains had a larger market share but a lower valuation in some cases.  For example, the Tesco market cap was £21.3bn. J Sainsbury was £4.47bn, with Morrisons at £3.95bn. I thought that this could lead to the Ocado share price falling as investors caught up to this fact. From a fundamental view as well, Ocado has become a less compelling buy this summer. With restrictions being completely lifted, people are happier to go back to physical stores. The vaccination rate is also very high, which suggests we’re unlikely to need another national lockdown as seen in 2020. Both reasons don’t support another surge in the share price. Uncertainty around the Ocado share price In the short term, there has been a pop higher in shares. Some of this relates to the half-year results released in early July. The Retail division showed an increase of 140k active customers versus the same period last year. The rise in orders per week was 20%. And growth is still being pursued, with 12 new fulfilment sites being targeted over the next three years. Most of the growth during this period (24.1%) was driven by the Retail segment, although Ocado does have tech, logistics and other arms worth noting. Yet ultimately, the company is still loss-making. For H1 2021, it lost £23.6m. I think investors took the report as a positive overall given the Ocado share price level. But I still have concerns about whether this rally can be sustained. The valuation has cheapened, but still looks expensive to me considering the losses generated. Even if I were to look ahead and buy the stock for future growth, I’m not convinced. It’s true that Ocado could retain most customers gained from the pandemic, but I expect order size and frequency to shrink as normality continues to resume. Overall, I don’t think the short-term pop is going to lead to something more. Therefore, I won’t be looking to buy shares in Ocado anytime soon. The post The Ocado share price: is this the beginning of another rally? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. One Killer Stock For The Cybersecurity Surge Cybersecurity is surging, with experts predicting that the cybersecurity market will reach US$366 billion by 2028 — more than double what it is today! And with that kind of growth, this North American company stands to be the biggest winner. Because their patented “self-repairing” technology is changing the cybersecurity landscape as we know it… We think it has the potential to become the next famous tech success story. In fact, we think it could become as big… or even BIGGER than Shopify. Click here to see how you can uncover the name of this North American stock that’s taking over Silicon Valley, one device at a time… More reading UK shares to buy now for the recovery jonathansmith1 has no position in any share mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Morrisons, Ocado Group, and Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  2. The Ocado share price dives 17% in 3 months. Here’s why (23/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Over the past three months, the FTSE 100 index has gained over 260 points (3.9%). However, not all FTSE 100 shares have risen over this period. Indeed, while 75 FTSE 100 stocks have climbed since late January, 26 have declined. And the worst performer over these three months is the Ocado (LSE: OCDO) share price. Here’s why. The FTSE 100’s worst performer Of the FTSE 100’s 101 stocks, 29 have risen by 10% or more in three months. These risers include many so-called value shares, whose prices have benefited from rising optimism for a post-lockdown boom. At the other end of the scale lie five shares whose values have declined by 10% or more over this period. Bottom of the list is the Ocado share price, which has crashed by more than a sixth (17.1%). Before this fall, the Ocado share price was riding high. On 30 September last year, Ocado shares hit a record high of 2,914p. This was almost double the 52-week low of 1,561.5p on 23 April 2020, exactly a year ago. In other words, Ocado stock had a fantastic five-month winning streak. But all winning streaks come to an end. The Ocado share price slips in 2021 The Ocado share price closed 2020 at 2,287p. It then enjoyed a bumper start to 2021, hitting 2,883p by 27 January. That’s a rise of 596p — more than a quarter (26.1%) — in four weeks. Following such a sudden and steep surge, Ocado shares were bound to take a breather. And so they have. As I write, they trade at 2,220p, down 663p — almost a quarter (23%) — from their late-January peak. After this price reversal, Ocado stock is actually down 67p (2.9%) in 2021. So what burst Ocado’s bubble? Could the Ocado share price stage a comeback? The main problem for the Ocado share price is that it was rated in line with highly valued US tech stocks. Floated in mid-2010, Ocado has been a public company for almost 11 years. In that time, it has generated huge cumulative losses, including a pre-tax loss of £214.5m in 2019. And as bond yields rose sharply in 2021, loss-making growth companies appear less attractive to investors. At its peak market value seven months ago, Ocado was worth £21.9bn, making it a FTSE 100 heavyweight. Today, the online supermarket is worth £16.6bn, a fall of £5.3bn. Then again, Ocado is growing much faster than its conventional rivals. Revenues from its retail business grew by two-fifths (40%) to almost £600m in the 13 weeks ending February. If Ocado can continue its market-beating growth, then its shares might deserve to be more highly rated than their peers. And, despite its recent plunge, the Ocado share price has been a winner year after year. It’s up 36.5% over one year, 58.5% over two years, 312.7% over three years, and a mighty 576.3% over five years. Would I buy this growth stock today? As a veteran value investor, I like to buy into companies with strong balance sheets, revenues, cash flows, profits, and dividends. Right now, Ocado doesn’t fit my bill at this price. With the Ocado share price at 2,220p, this business is valued at 9.4 times its 2019 revenues. That’s far too rich for my bargain-hunter’s blood. Finally, I said Ocado was a bubble waiting to burst on 28 January. With the shares having fallen steeply since then, go-go growth investors might find these lower entry points enticing! FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading How I’d target 1,000%+ returns by investing in UK shares 3 top FTSE tech stocks to buy in April Cliffdarcy has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Ocado share price dives 17% in 3 months. Here’s why appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  3. The Ocado share price has crashed 36% in 4 months. Can it recover? (02/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    It’s been a tough few months for shareholders in online supermarket Ocado Group (LSE: OCDO). The Ocado share price, once a high-flyer, has crashed back to earth like Icarus. Indeed, Ocado’s owners have lost almost £8bn of wealth in four months. The Ocado share price’s relentless rise Here’s how the Ocado share price has performed over the medium term: 2Y +56.4% 3Y +108.9% 5Y +592.6% The Ocado share price is up across all three multi-year periods. Over five years, £1,000 invested into OCDO would have become £6,926. This ranks the stock at #1 in the FTSE 100 index over a half-decade. It also ranks at #7 over three years and #16 over two years. Anyone investing in Ocado shares before 2020 picked a big, big winner. However, after a strong start to 2021, the shares have fallen steeply, raising concerns that the stock’s best days may be behind it. OCDO crashes in 2021 Here is the Ocado share price’s performance over four shorter timescales, ranging from one week to one year: 1W -6.5% 1M -14.2% 3M -12.3% 6M -15.9% 1Y -15.9% As you can see, the Ocado share price has fallen over all five periods, losing almost a sixth (15.9%) of its value over six months and one year. So what’s gone wrong? Actually, 2021 started brilliantly for Ocado. After ending 2020 at 2,287p, the Ocado share price initially soared this calendar year. By 27 January, it had surged by almost a quarter (26.1%) to hit 2,883p. This took the stock to within 12 pence of its all-time closing high of 2,895p on 29 September 2020. So far, so good. However, with the arrival of February, the Ocado share price began to slide. As I write, it stands at 1,848p, down more than £10 from its late-January peak. This means that OCDO stock has crashed a whopping 35.9% (more than a third) in just over four months. This has slashed the group’s market value from £21.7bn to £13.9bn — a loss of £7.8bn. Ouch. What next for this growth stock? At its current level, the Ocado share price hovers just 4.5p above its 52-week low of 1,843.5p, hit a year ago on 2 June 2020. Right now, I don’t own stock in this company. But with the shares having crashed lately, perhaps now might be a good time to add this growth stock to my family portfolio? I’m not so sure. One problem I have with Ocado is it is an ‘all promise and no profit’ company. Importantly, the group has made significant losses in every one of its 21 years of existence. But growth companies are often ‘jam tomorrow’ stocks, right? So what might convince me to buy at current price levels? First, I’d hope to see Ocado continue its rapid sales growth. In the 13 weeks to end-February, the group’s sales soared by almost two-fifths (39.7%) year on year to £599m. However, the average number of weekly orders rose only 2.5% over the same period. Second, I’d like to see the company sign more deals to sell its proprietary e-commerce technology to overseas supermarket chains. Third, I’d be encouraged to see Ocado partner with a leading grocer in some major, untapped European market (say, Germany or Spain). Finally, I’d like to see its UK retail arm start making hefty pre-tax profits. In short, until more good news emerges, I will steer clear of the Ocado share price for now. One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues Looking for new share ideas? Grab this FREE report now. Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits. From 2015-2019… Revenues increased 38.6%. Its net income went up 19.7 times! Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLED The opportunity here really is astounding. In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer? You could have the full details on this company right now. Grab your free report – while it’s online. More reading 2 sliding FTSE 100 shares I’d buy 3 UK growth stocks I’d buy now The Ocado share price has crashed 31% in 3 months. Will OCDO rebound? Cliffdarcy has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Ocado share price has crashed 36% in 4 months. Can it recover? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  4. Here’s what I’m doing about the Ocado share price (09/07/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Ocado (LSE: OCDO) shares are down 30% from their recent highs in January. Last Tuesday, Ocado released its interim results for the first half of 2021. Since then, the Ocado share price has fallen a further 8%. What caused this decline and will I be adding Ocado shares to my portfolio? How did the company fare over the last six months? Ocado revealed that it grew in the first half of the year. Revenues grew 21% year on year to £1.3bn. This growth came as the pandemic caused customers to eat out less and turn to online grocery retailers as an alternative to shopping in person. During the period, earnings before interest­, taxation,­ depreciation, and amortisation (EBITDA) also grew by 58% to £61m. Ocado registered a loss of £20.6m for the period. This is largely thanks to the massive investments the company is currently making to expand its portfolio of state-of-the-art automated customer fulfilment centres. As these investments should lead to future growth, the firm’s losses do not worry me too much at this stage. Ocado’s strong balance sheet also helps the situation. Currently, the company has a net cash position of £189m. As such, it should be able to withstand future losses and avoid financial distress. Why has the Ocado share price fallen? In my opinion, one of the main reasons for the recent decline in the share price is that investors are worried that Ocado cannot maintain its current rate of growth. As the economy starts to recover from the pandemic and lockdown measures are eased, more people have returned to restaurants and physical supermarket shops. As such, the demand for Ocado’s products is beginning to normalise. This was confirmed on Tuesday when the company reported that customer basket sizes are moving back towards pre-pandemic levels. This concern is reflected in analysts’ forecasts. The median estimate among analysts is for revenues to grow by 16% in 2021. Although this is still strong growth, it is a sharp decline from the 33% growth the company achieved in 2020. I think this predicted decline in the growth rate, coupled with the fact that the Ocado share price had already increased by over 167% since the start of the pandemic, caused many investors to sell their shares in the company. What’s in store for Ocado? Despite the challenges the company faces with the reopening of the economy, I am optimistic about the future of Ocado. When the pandemic is over, the company is still likely to benefit from the general trend towards automation, digitisation, and e-commerce. This trend accelerated during the pandemic and I am confident it will continue after the pandemic has ended. Such a trend should give Ocado the opportunity to generate long-term sustainable growth. Will I be buying Ocado shares? As a general rule, I do not invest in unprofitable companies. This is because they are usually very difficult to value. However, as I am positive regarding the future of this company, I will certainly be keeping my eye on the Ocado share price with a view to adding it to my portfolio. The post Here’s what I’m doing about the Ocado share price appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading The Ocado share price has fallen: should I buy now? Would I buy Ocado stock after its 30% fall? Is the Ocado share price set for a bounce-back with grocers soaring? How I’d invest £1,000 in 3 FTSE 100 stocks The Ocado share price is sliding! Is it too late to buy the stock? Ollie Henry has no position in any shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  5. The Ocado share price is climbing again. Is it set for another giant leap? (26/08/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The supermarket sector has been well and truly shaken up by the Morrisons bidding war. It appears to have been won by US private equity firm Clayton, Dubilier & Rice, whose £7bn offer edged out rival Fortress. Now, it seems, supermarket fever is spreading to the Ocado (LSE: OCDO) share price. Ocado shares had slumped since peaking in January at 2,888p. By 13 August, the price had fallen 38%. That’s a big drop, and it comes at a time when the groceries business is picking up and supermarket share prices are strengthening. Even Marks & Spencer, which has a partnership with Ocado, is looking positive in 2021. We do need to see it in perspective, though. By the middle of August, Ocado was still up close to 50% over two years. It started spiking upwards when Covid-19 struck, and home deliveries were suddenly a hot thing. Since flotation, the Ocado share price has soared more than 1,000%. That super-rapid growth makes Ocado very hard to value, at least for me. Is it “the world’s largest dedicated online grocery retailer,” as it has billed itself? Or is it a technology company supplying the hardware and software for others to get into the online shopping business? Two investments in one It’s both, really. And the market seems to still be trying to work out how to apportion values to the different parts. That’s especially hard as we still haven’t seen any profits, even if revenue is growing. Still, 2020 brought a much reduced pre-tax loss. And I have to wonder if we’re close to seeing a swing to sustainable profits. Anyway, let’s get back to the events of the past couple of weeks. Since the recent low on 13 August, the Ocado share price has spiked by 15%. Incidentally, the Marks & Spencer share price leapfrogged Ocado, jumping 22% in the same time. Does it mean investors are expecting takeover bids to emerge for Ocado and for M&S now? I do think we might see more acquisition action in the groceries business in the coming months. And private equity firms seem to have the money to invest and the appetite for taking a risk. But I seriously doubt there’s enough investment cash washing around to take out all of Morrisons, Ocado, M&S, and Sainsbury. So some folk investing in those stocks in the hope of a quick buyout profit are very likely to be disappointed, I reckon. Ocado share price direction? I just don’t know how to value Ocado at the moment. A fresh price surge on the back of renewed growth investor interest, or a fall-off in sales as we get back to normalised shopping? I think we could see either of those. So what will I do? My solution is simple. If I find a stock hard to value, there’s no need to panic. I can just skip it and move on to others that I feel I have a good handle on. Some investors like a bit of higher-risk growth investing, and I wish them success if they go for Ocado. But I’ll stick to profitable companies paying me fat dividends. The post The Ocado share price is climbing again. Is it set for another giant leap? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Inflation Is Coming: 3 Shares To Try And Hedge Against Rising Prices Make no mistake… inflation is coming. Some people are running scared, but there’s one thing we believe we should avoid doing at all costs when inflation hits… and that’s doing nothing. Money that just sits in the bank can often lose value each and every year. But to savvy savers and investors, where to consider putting their money is the million-dollar question. That’s why we’ve put together a brand-new special report that uncovers 3 of our top UK and US share ideas to try and best hedge against inflation… …because no matter what the economy is doing, a savvy investor will want their money working for them, inflation or not! Best of all, we’re giving this report away completely FREE today! Simply click here, enter your email address, and we’ll send it to you right away. More reading Is the Ocado share price set for a comeback? 2 FTSE 100 stocks to buy The Ocado share price: is this the beginning of another rally? UK shares to buy now for the recovery Alan Oscroft has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Morrisons and Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  6. Ocado (LON:OCDO) sales fall 19% after warehouse fire (14/09/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Ocado Group (LSE: OCDO) shares fell this morning after the online grocer said that a warehouse fire in July caused revenue to fall by 19%. The fire — the second in three years — is only said to have damaged 1% of the robotic grid at the Erith warehouse. However, management doesn’t expect the site to return to full capacity until the end of November. Fires aside, Ocado appears to be performing well. Revenue fell by 1.8% during the six weeks to July 16. This tells me that the company has held on to most of the gains it made last year, when sales rose by 54% during the original lockdown. Although the average customer order value has fallen from £141 to £124 over the last year, Ocado is continuing to attract new customers. The group said customer numbers rose by 64,000 to 805,000 during the quarter, leading to a 22% increase in weekly orders. Ocado’s joint venture with Marks & Spencer also seems to be making progress. The company says that 29% of products sold are now M&S branded items. Ocado shares under pressure from rising costs Driver shortages have forced Ocado to increase driver wages and offer sign-on bonuses. The company expects this to add up to £5m to costs this year. Ocado’s insurers will pick up many of the the costs of the Erith fire. However, the company expects around £10m of excess costs aren’t covered by insurance. As a result, I expect the group’s losses to be higher than the £220m currently forecast for this year. Ocado’s share price has fallen by nearly 15% over the last six months, leaving it lagging behind rival supermarkets. However, the stock continues to trade at more than five times forecast sales. This suggests that expectations for future growth from the group’s technology business remain high. The post Ocado (LON:OCDO) sales fall 19% after warehouse fire appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. One Killer Stock For The Cybersecurity Surge Cybersecurity is surging, with experts predicting that the cybersecurity market will reach US$366 billion by 2028 — more than double what it is today! And with that kind of growth, this North American company stands to be the biggest winner. Because their patented “self-repairing” technology is changing the cybersecurity landscape as we know it… We think it has the potential to become the next famous tech success story. In fact, we think it could become as big… or even BIGGER than Shopify. Click here to see how you can uncover the name of this North American stock that’s taking over Silicon Valley, one device at a time… More reading The Ocado share price is climbing again. Is it set for another giant leap? Is the Ocado share price set for a comeback? 2 FTSE 100 stocks to buy The Ocado share price: is this the beginning of another rally? UK shares to buy now for the recovery Roland Head has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  7. The Ocado share price has crashed 31% in 3 months. Will OCDO rebound? (06/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    After a fantastic 2020, this year has also started handsomely for shareholders of Ocado Group (LSE: OCDO). The Ocado share price continued its relentless rise during January after ending last year at 2,287p. At its 2021 closing peak, it reached 2,883p on 27 January. This was within a whisker of its all-time closing high of 2,895p on 29 September 2020. But then the shares headed sharply and steeply southwards. Ocado shares crash since late January As I write, the Ocado share price is exactly £19, down 62p (3.2%) on Wednesday’s close. In other words, it has fallen by almost £10 since its September 2020 and January 2021 peaks. Indeed, OCDO shares have plunged by more than a third (34.1%) since 27 January. As a result, the online grocer‘s market value has fallen to £14.7bn from a high above £22.3bn. To be honest, this steep setback to the Ocado share price was a long time coming. On 28 January, one day after OCDO’s 2021 peak, I warned that,“To me, Ocado looks like a bubble waiting to burst”. My remarks followed a near-30% rise in the shares in the first four weeks of this year. Hence, the recent collapse to below £20 comes as absolutely no surprise to me. Ocado’s bubble bursts in 2021 For the record, here’s how the Ocado share price has performed over four recent timeframe: 1W 1M 3M 6M -9.9% -6.2% -30.5% -23.2% As you can see, the Ocado share price has turned from a star stock to dog of late, falling over all four periods. Furthermore, OCDO is the worst-performing FTSE 100 share over the past three months. It seems that, at least for now, Ocado’s bubble has burst. That said, this recent slump followed year after year of stellar gains. Here’s how OCDO has skyrocketed over the longer term: 1Y 2Y 3Y 5Y 16.9% 45.8% 247.0% 585.1% Conversely, over the past half-decade, OCDO shares have been the #1 best performer in the Footsie, as well as one of the biggest winners over three years. Nice. What next for the Ocado share price? Forecasting short-term changes in share prices can be a very, very humbling experience. Stock prices can be pushed around by buying or selling pressures, individual company news, or wider economic events. What’s more, it’s impossible to value OCDO using conventional fundamentals. That’s because, as a loss-making business, it has a negative price-to-earnings ratio and earnings yield. Also, having never paid a cash dividend, Ocado’s dividend yield has always been zero. This makes forecasting the Ocado share price a particularly dangerous game. Nevertheless, I feel that OCDO is on a knife edge at the moment. If the recent price momentum continues, then the shares might return to levels not seen since May 2020. However, if growth investors return to buying, then the Ocado share price could stage a comeback. Right now, so much depends on how Ocado’s sales perform as lockdowns ease and people return to shopping in the real world. If the group’s spectacular sales growth of 2020 can continue into 2021/22, then the future looks bright for Ocado. Even so, while the business remains heavily loss-making, I will avoid the shares for now. Even at these lower levels, my instincts as an old-school value investor tell me to avoid the Ocado share price today! FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading The Ocado share price dives 17% in 3 months. Here’s why How I’d target 1,000%+ returns by investing in UK shares 3 top FTSE tech stocks to buy in April Cliffdarcy has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Ocado share price has crashed 31% in 3 months. Will OCDO rebound? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  8. Why I’m bullish on the Ocado share price (15/09/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The Ocado (LSE: OCDO) share price hit a high of 2,895p in September 2020, before falling to 1,731p this July. After climbing to 2,013p by the end of August, it’s slipped back to 1,852p today. So what’s going on? I’ve recently written about the Tesco share price movement. But despite also selling groceries, Ocado is a different kettle of fish. It doesn’t have physical stores, and it uses advanced robotics to pick and pack online orders from specialised warehouses.  The pandemic bull run The self-isolation requirements of the pandemic saw online grocery orders rocketing. People who had never used Ocado before turned to the grocer when their usual shop ran out of delivery slots, leading sales to rise 54% during the first lockdown. And the market dip in March 2020 caused investors to rush to the stock as a strong defensive play. These dual effects combined to send the Ocado share price soaring. As the pandemic subsides, it’s unsurprising that investors are pulling out of Ocado, looking for more lucrative short-term opportunities. But I subscribe to the Foolish investing style of holding stocks for the long term. And I believe that Ocado’s fundamentals are very promising. Ambiguous results The Ocado share price fell yesterday after a weak quarterly update. It suffered a major fire at its Erith warehouse in July, caused by a collision of three of its robots. Some 300,000 orders were lost, resulting in a £20m loss from business disruption and destroyed stock. Insurance is covering half this amount, so an unanticipated £10m debt will hit profitability over the next year. And while it says lessons were learnt, it’s the second fire in only three years. Revenue slumped 19% in the seven weeks after the fire, with overall revenue down 10.6% from £552m to £517m.  However, it was only down 1.8% in the first six weeks of the quarter, which suggests the company has retained customers it attracted during the pandemic. And the recent tie-up with Marks & Spencer is also a good sign, with 29% of products ordered now being M&S items. This partnership is likely to increase in value, as M&S has upgraded its profit guidance for the year. A bumper Christmas for the Ocado share price? Customer numbers rose by 64,000 to 805,000, while average orders per week increased by 1.4% to 338,000. And it expects “strong revenue growth in FY22”. While average order value fell from £141 to £124 over the last year, it’s unsurprising as consumers can now visit hospitality venues again. Ocado expects its Erith warehouse to be fully operational by November, with CEO Tim Steiner confident of a “bumper Christmas”. He’s unconcerned about food shortages, believing there’ll be “small interruptions but nothing substantial.” And Ocado’s wider product range means it can more easily make substitutions. But the retailer has had to set aside £5m for vehicles, wages and bonuses in order to combat the ongoing lorry driver shortage. And this could affect Ocado more than its rivals, as it doesn’t have any physical stores.  This is a growth stock, so the potential rewards come with a risk alongside. Its warehouse technology is unique in the sector, but new technology always comes with technical issues. I think the Ocado share price is at a level to make it a good buy for my portfolio, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see wild swings along the way. The post Why I’m bullish on the Ocado share price appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues Looking for new share ideas? Grab this FREE report now. Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits. From 2015-2019… Revenues increased 38.6%. Its net income went up 19.7 times! Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLED The opportunity here really is astounding. In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer? You could have the full details on this company right now. Grab your free report – while it’s online. More reading Can the Ocado share price start rising again? Worried about another lockdown? 3 of the best shares to buy now Ocado (LON:OCDO) sales fall 19% after warehouse fire The Ocado share price is climbing again. Is it set for another giant leap? Is the Ocado share price set for a comeback? Charles Archer has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Morrisons, Ocado Group, and Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  9. Ocado was the worst-performing FTSE 100 share in February. Here’s why (01/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Ocado Group (LSE:OCDO) enjoyed a very strong 2020. It was one of the few companies that actually saw increased demand for its products and services with the lockdown. The technology and distribution arm of the business grew, as well as the more traditional online grocery service it provides. In a year, Ocado shares are up almost 100%. Unfortunately, in February it was the worst-performing FTSE 100 stock, down over 23%.  Growing but still loss-making A couple of weeks ago, I covered Ocado shares following the release of the full-year 2020 results. It may have been rather puzzling at first glance on the day, as Ocado shares slumped despite strong percentage growth in key areas.  For example, retail revenue was up 35%, with the logistics and solutions network growing 13.5% year-on-year. However, some may forget that Ocado is still a loss making company. 2020 was no different, despite the growth. The growth meant a smaller loss of £44.1m than the 2019 figure of £214.5m, but it’s still a loss. This was the main driver as to why the share price fell after the results were released in February. If the growth trajectory maintains at the same percentage, then Ocado should break even as early as the end of this year. Another company-specific issue that has caused Ocado shares to wobble is the rumour of a new digital sales tax. Ocado CEO Tim Steiner last month said it was “wholly inappropriate”. As the digital sales tax is still at a very early stage of consideration by the Government, full details aren’t clear. However, it looks as if online companies like Ocado would be subject to an extra tax when selling goods. Such a tax could dent earnings. Ocado shares suffering from positive news It may seem contradictory, but Ocado shares also suffered last week due to a more optimistic outlook on Covid-19. Last week the share price fell over 14%, coinciding with PM Johnson releasing his pathway to lockdown easing. The guidance means that restrictions are likely to be eased in coming months, with all restrictions potentially lifted by June.  Add into this mix the continued performance of the vaccination rollout here in the UK. The figure is now over 20 million, and rising quickly each day. Putting both together, it looks like lockdown will be eased and consumers will feel more comfortable shopping again in physical stores. Even though Ocado is a diversified business, it could see a hit to revenues it gets from online grocery orders. The extent to which revenues could fall remains unknown. And of course, they may continue to grow (but much more slowly than in the past year). Ocado shares have fallen on these announcements, and analysts will be trying to forecast the potential hit to Ocado and how this translates to the bottom line. Overall, Ocado shares were the worst-performing FTSE 100 stocks in February by some distance. Yet it’s important to remember that over the longer term, the share price has still performed very well.  A Top Share with Enormous Growth Potential Savvy investors like you won’t want to miss out on this timely opportunity… Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK analyst all fired up about this ‘pure-play’ online business (yes, despite the pandemic!). Not only does this company enjoy a dominant market-leading position… But its capital-light, highly scalable business model has previously helped it deliver consistently high sales, astounding near-70% margins, and rising shareholder returns … in fact, in 2019 it returned a whopping £150m+ to shareholders in dividends and buybacks! And here’s the really exciting part… While COVID-19 may have thrown the company a curveball, management have acted swiftly to ensure this business is as well placed as it can be to ride out the current period of uncertainty… in fact, our analyst believes it should come roaring back to life, just as soon as normal economic activity resumes. That’s why we think now could be the perfect time for you to start building your own stake in this exceptional business – especially given the shares look to be trading on a fairly undemanding valuation for the year to March 2021. Click here to claim your copy of this special report now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Growth Share… free of charge! More reading Top British stocks for March 2021 2 of the best FTSE 100 shares to buy now and hold for 20 years Can Ocado stock stay strong in a post pandemic world? This FTSE 100 stock is up 806% since 2016. Is it the best UK share to buy today? The Ocado share price is around 2,300p. Would I buy now? jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Ocado was the worst-performing FTSE 100 share in February. Here’s why appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  10. The Ocado share price has doubled in a year: should I buy on today’s dip? (09/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Shares in online grocery retail specialist Ocado Group (LSE: OCDO) have risen by more than 100% over the last 12 months. But investors don’t seem too excited about today’s full-year earnings from the firm. Ocado’s share price is down by 3% Tuesday morning, as I write. Today’s results seem to be broadly in line with forecasts, so what might be the problem? I’ve been taking a fresh look at this high-tech growth story. Sales up 33% in 2020 Ocado’s revenue rose by 33% to £2,332m last year. But the group remained loss-making and recorded an after-tax loss for the year of £174m. That’s a slight reduction on the £212m loss reported for 2019. What do these numbers tell me? Ocado’s UK retail business is continuing to make decent progress. Sales rose by 35% last year and the business generated an underlying profit of £149m. However, a retail operation of this size isn’t usually big enough to justify Ocado’s market-cap of £20bn. This reflects its growing status as a technology stock which sells software and automated warehouse solutions to other retailers. Ocado has signed some big deals with supermarkets such as US chain Kroger in the last few years. But these deals usually require Ocado to build new warehouses and set up its system before generating much revenue. Indeed, Ocado generated just £17m of revenue from its international business last year. But the company says that “fees not yet recognised as revenue” rose by 52% to £256m. These fees reflect work completed by Ocado that won’t be due for payment until “a working solution” has been handed over to the customer. The sharp growth in this number suggests to me this business is gaining momentum. I think this is one reason why Ocado’s share price has performed so strongly over the last year. What could go wrong? I have two main concerns about Ocado. The first is that after nearly 10 years on the stock market, Ocado is still losing money. The company’s big projects require a lot of upfront expenditure before they generate any revenue. Ocado plans to invest £700m in new facilities and product development in 2021. Brokers expect the business to report a loss of around £150m in 2021. I don’t like businesses with no clear path to profitability. A second problem is that Ocado has growing competition. One competitor, Norwegian firm Autostore, is currently suing Ocado for alleged patent infringements. Ocado denies the allegations, but the UK firm has warned shareholders that legal costs are expected to rise sharply in 2021. Ocado share price: too high or too low? Based on this year’s figures, Ocado shares are valued at 8.7 times sales and about 280 times EBITDA (a measure of profit before certain costs). This isn’t a valuation I can get comfortable with, especially as Ocado is expected to remain loss-making for several more years. I’ve avoided this stock for many years because I’ve thought it was too expensive. Events have proven me wrong, at least so far. Ocado’s share price has risen by nearly 1,000% over the last five years and the firm has had no problem raising extra cash when necessary. It’s clear there are many deep-pocketed investors who believe Ocado’s business is more valuable than I do. They may be right. But I don’t believe in buying shares that I think are too expensive. A Top Share with Enormous Growth Potential Savvy investors like you won’t want to miss out on this timely opportunity… Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK analyst all fired up about this ‘pure-play’ online business (yes, despite the pandemic!). Not only does this company enjoy a dominant market-leading position… But its capital-light, highly scalable business model has previously helped it deliver consistently high sales, astounding near-70% margins, and rising shareholder returns … in fact, in 2019 it returned a whopping £150m+ to shareholders in dividends and buybacks! And here’s the really exciting part… While COVID-19 may have thrown the company a curveball, management have acted swiftly to ensure this business is as well placed as it can be to ride out the current period of uncertainty… in fact, our analyst believes it should come roaring back to life, just as soon as normal economic activity resumes. That’s why we think now could be the perfect time for you to start building your own stake in this exceptional business – especially given the shares look to be trading on a fairly undemanding valuation for the year to March 2021. Click here to claim your copy of this special report now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Growth Share… free of charge! More reading The Ocado share price slumps! Should I buy the stock today? These 2 FTSE 100 shares have leapt over 20% in 30 days. Which would I buy? I’d avoid the IAG share price – I think this 2020 top performer will soar further in 2021 Should I chase the Ocado share price higher or listen to Warren Buffet and buy a tracker instead? I think the Ocado share price could crush the FTSE 100 this year Roland Head has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Ocado share price has doubled in a year: should I buy on today’s dip? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  11. 3 reasons why the Ocado share price fell 7% last week (15/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Last week, the Ocado (LSE:OCDO) share price was the worst performer within the FTSE 100. As of early Friday afternoon it was down 9.13% before a late rally saw it finish the week down 7.13%. The stock enjoyed a stellar 2020, with the pandemic meaning that an online-supermarket with home delivery was top of many people’s priority lists. Full-year results released last week highlighted this, yet the share price still manage to finish the week heavily down. What happened here? Results and potential taxes Last Tuesday, the full-year 2020 results were released. The Ocado share price dropped first thing on Tuesday morning. It couldn’t make it back to the levels seen on Monday throughout the rest of the trading day. But the results had shown that retail revenue growth for the year was 35%, with the solutions and logistics arm growing by 13.6%. The report flagged large scale opportunities for further growth in the online grocery space, with a target market globally valued at £2.8trn. Ultimately, Ocado still was loss-making in 2020. It lost £44.1m before tax. This is an improvement on the 2019 loss of £214.5m, but is still a loss. Hence, the Ocado share price dropped. But Ocado should become profitable over the next one or two years if the current trajectory continues. Sometimes the market can be short term in its viewpoint, especially when results are first released. A second reason the Ocado share price fell last week was because of concerns around a possible new digital sales tax. This is something that’s currently being discussed by the Government, and could negatively impact Ocado. Tesco and 17 other retailers (with a physical presence) had sent a letter to the Government asking for a fairer trading environment. This called for a sales tax on online retailers. If a tax was brought in, then naturally this would reduce profitability for Ocado by the amount of the tax. If it’s a small percentage then it won’t be a big issue, but if it’s a tax the size of VAT or something similar, this could be a big problem. Concern for Ocado shares for 2021? The final reason that Ocado shares are struggling to hold ground is due to improved sentiment regarding getting life back to normal. News last week was positive.  The virus R number in the UK dropped below 1 for the first time since July so infections are clearly in decline. It was also reported during the week that the NHS is on track to meet Government vaccination targets. Ocado has a diversified business model involving technology solutions, logistics and international exposure. However, if the UK came out of lockdown and into some degree normality, the online grocery arm could see a revenue fall. People would feel more comfortable going back into physical stores, so Ocado as a ‘stay-at-home’ stock could struggle and continue to fall. It might not, of course, with many consumers having now developed a taste for online grocery shopping. And if the firm can focus on growing other business arms, then I don’t see this being a huge risk in the long term for the Ocado share price. Further, even though the full-year results showed a loss, I think the business could move to profitability in the mid-term. As such, I’d look to use this dip as an opportunity to buy the stock. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading 1 UK share I’d buy and hold for the next 10 years The Ocado share price has doubled in a year: should I buy on today’s dip? The Ocado share price slumps! Should I buy the stock today? These 2 FTSE 100 shares have leapt over 20% in 30 days. Which would I buy? I’d avoid the IAG share price – I think this 2020 top performer will soar further in 2021 jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post 3 reasons why the Ocado share price fell 7% last week appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  12. The Ocado share price is sliding! Is it too late to buy the stock? (18/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The Ocado (LSE: OCDO) share price has collapsed over the past few months. After hitting an all-time high of around 2,900p at the beginning of February, the stock has steadily traded lower. It’s currently changing hands at around 1,900p, a decline of nearly 33%. Over the past 12 months, shares in the retail and technology group are down 3% overall.  This price action seems to suggest the company’s time in the sun is over. But past performance should never be used as a guide to future potential. The Ocado share price may be down 33% from its all-time high, but the business is in a stronger financial position than it’s ever been. In fact, over the past year, the company’s fortunes have changed completely. A year of change  After spending more than a decade developing its technology, Ocado’s hard work paid off last year when its robotic warehouses proved their worth in the pandemic. These helped its retail business grow substantially, while its competitors struggled to catch up. For example, in the second quarter of 2020, Ocado enjoyed sales growth of 42%, bettering any major UK supermarket. Its market share also increased to 1.7%.  Management believes last year helped cement Ocado’s position in the market. Earlier this year, CEO Tim Steiner said that after customers had placed between three to five orders with the group, they stayed with the firm. This implies last year’s customer growth wasn’t a one-off. The company should be able to build on this over the next few years.  At the same time, the company may enjoy increased demand for its robotic warehouse technology. Throughout the pandemic, this technology showed that having robots rather than humans in warehouses was more efficient.  Ocado share price risks  Unfortunately, the company is fighting several potentially devastating lawsuits with AutoStore Technology. The latter argues that its rival has infringed some of its patents. AutoStore says it supplied Ocado with its technology as early as 2012. This technology forms the foundations on which the Ocado Smart Platform was built. These lawsuits are threatening Ocado’s expansion plans in the UK and United States. They could also thwart its plans to sell automated warehouse technology around the world. This is probably the most prominent risk hanging over the stock right now.  I think this is the primary reason why the Ocado share price has been sliding over the past few months. It seems to me that investors are becoming concerned about the potential fallout from these lawsuits.  I think the market is right to be concerned, but I’m also impressed by the growth of the retail business. As such, I believe the Ocado share price looks attractive after recent declines. However, I’d only buy the stock as a speculative investment until there’s more clarity around the lawsuits. The post The Ocado share price is sliding! Is it too late to buy the stock? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Our 5 Top Shares for the New “Green Industrial Revolution" It was released in November 2020, and make no mistake: It’s happening. The UK Government’s 10-point plan for a new “Green Industrial Revolution.” PriceWaterhouse Coopers believes this trend will cost £400billion… …That’s just here in Britain over the next 10 years. Worldwide, the Green Industrial Revolution could be worth TRILLIONS. It’s why I’m urging all investors to read this special presentation carefully, and learn how you can uncover the 5 companies that we believe are poised to profit from this gargantuan trend ahead! Access this special "Green Industrial Revolution" presentation now More reading 2 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy with £2k The Ocado share price has crashed 36% in 4 months. Can it recover? 2 sliding FTSE 100 shares I’d buy Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  13. Would I buy Ocado stock after its 30% fall? (06/07/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The answer is yes, I would buy Ocado (LSE: OCDO) stock after its 30% fall. Ocado has seen a share price tumble of 30% since the all-time highs it touched last year. But its performance is strong. It is exactly this disconnect that convinces me to buy this FTSE 100 stock. Let me explain in some detail.  Ocado share price fluctuations The Ocado share price ran up fast during the pandemic as grocery deliveries were a far safer and more convenient option than making trips to stores. By late September 2020, it had touched its highest ever levels.  It was unable to sustain these levels, however, as the stock market rally put the focus once again on shares effected by the coronavirus. But as the UK went into another lockdown, it rose back to its highs only to fall once more as optimism set in. But here is the catch. Strengthening fundamentals  I do not think that Ocado’s pandemic growth spurt was a flash in the pan. It is quite likely that the pandemic has changed consumer behaviour forever. It has certainly changed mine. I am a convert to grocery deliveries, and will not revert to in-store purchases.  I reckon this is true for other consumers too. Which is why, for the half-year ending May 2021, Ocado reported strong performance “even as Covid-19 restrictions ease”. Its revenue is up 21.4%, its net loss has almost halved, cash has increased, and debt has reduced too.  More growth can be expected going by its on the ground expansion. In 2021 so far, it has opened three customer fulfilment centres (CFCs), where customer orders are processed. One of them is in the UK while the other two are US-based. Further, it says that the “momentum of CFC openings is building”. It has also entered into a new partnership with France’s Auchan Retail, to develop its online business in Spain. Moreover, its recent acquisitions are expected to spur its growth further too.  As an investor, these developments convince me of Ocado’s value.  A wait and some risks That value could take a while to show up, though. Right now, the Ocado share price is back to around where it was a year ago. In other words, all the gains made during the pandemic have been wiped out. That can be disappointing.  Also, supermarkets are a challenging business. There is always pressure on price, as Ocado’s partner in the UK, Marks & Spencer (M&S) has experienced in recent months. And if the retailer continues to struggle, it could impact Ocado too.  Would I buy the Ocado share? But I am more optimistic than not on the stock. Fast expansion means that it is less dependent on M&S for growth. Further, the pandemic has pivoted consumer behaviour in favour of online shopping. And strengthening financials means that it can withstand any potential uncertainties brought on by relaxations of restrictions.   For me, Ocado is a long-term investment. And now is a good time for me to buy. The post Would I buy Ocado stock after its 30% fall? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues Looking for new share ideas? Grab this FREE report now. Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits. From 2015-2019… Revenues increased 38.6%. Its net income went up 19.7 times! Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLED The opportunity here really is astounding. In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer? You could have the full details on this company right now. Grab your free report – while it’s online. More reading Is the Ocado share price set for a bounce-back with grocers soaring? How I’d invest £1,000 in 3 FTSE 100 stocks The Ocado share price is sliding! Is it too late to buy the stock? 2 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy with £2k Manika Premsingh owns shares of Ocado Group. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  14. The Ocado share price is around 2,300p. Would I buy now? (23/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The Ocado (LSE:OCDO) share price has been on fire this past year. With the pandemic forcing most people to stay at home, the online-supermarket stock enjoyed a significant business boost. But over the past few weeks, the share price has begun to decline. Why? And is this a potential buying opportunity for my growth portfolio? Let’s take a look. Why did the Ocado share price fall? The business published its full-year 2020 results in early February and I think the company is performing quite well. Total revenue increased by 32.7%, primarily due to UK operational growth. And its International Solutions segment looks like it’s taking off with revenue rising from £0.5m to £16.6m. The firm remains unprofitable, but its losses also declined from £214.5m in 2019 to £44.1m in 2020. So why is the Ocado share price falling? As I see it, investors are being more cautious due to two factors. The first is the potential introduction of a digital sales tax. The second is the expectation of a slowdown in online sales growth as more of the population gets vaccinated against Covid-19. Personally, I’m not overly concerned about either of these threats. And here’s why. Ocado is building a robot army As previously stated, the recent pullback in the Ocado share price is likely linked to its online supermarket segment. While that does currently generate the most significant portion of revenue, it’s no longer the primary focus of the business. But the stock pivoted in 2019, transforming into a technology-led software and robotics solutions company. So what does that mean? Basically, it built a robot army to help automate the majority of the process of producing, packaging and delivering groceries to retailers worldwide. Today, over 10 supermarket chains — including Morrisons, Coles, and Kroger — have signed up to use its robot-driven platform. What I find particularly promising is the prospect of a network effect forming. As more companies join the platform, its resources grow. This subsequently enables faster innovation to improve efficiency, which in turn attracts more companies to sign up.  There are many challenges ahead While the robot-driven platform is vastly different from the home delivery of food, it still serves the same market – groceries. This means that the regulatory requirements for producing and packaging food must be maintained. This is a task made even more complicated by its international operations as the rules vary from country to country. Any delays or disruptions in the supply chain would likely damage Ocado’s reputation as well as the relationships with its platform customers. Even more so if the cause is a regulatory breach. Another significant risk that may lead to operational disruption is the workforce itself. The majority of Ocado’s employees are EU nationals (for now). This adds additional complications as the UK is no longer a member of the EU. Thus most workers will have to acquire visas. While this is only a short-term problem, it could lead to the potential loss of key personnel. Would I buy Ocado at the current share price? There are certainly plenty of risks ahead, but the business is trying to redesign supermarkets’ grocery supply chains. If it succeeds, robots could become the new standard way of doing business for all grocery stores. Personally, I think the risks are worth the reward and so Ocado looks like it could be a fine addition to my portfolio. But there is another growth stock that caught my attention this week. Here is: A Top Share with Enormous Growth Potential Savvy investors like you won’t want to miss out on this timely opportunity… Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK analyst all fired up about this ‘pure-play’ online business (yes, despite the pandemic!). Not only does this company enjoy a dominant market-leading position… But its capital-light, highly scalable business model has previously helped it deliver consistently high sales, astounding near-70% margins, and rising shareholder returns … in fact, in 2019 it returned a whopping £150m+ to shareholders in dividends and buybacks! And here’s the really exciting part… While COVID-19 may have thrown the company a curveball, management have acted swiftly to ensure this business is as well placed as it can be to ride out the current period of uncertainty… in fact, our analyst believes it should come roaring back to life, just as soon as normal economic activity resumes. That’s why we think now could be the perfect time for you to start building your own stake in this exceptional business – especially given the shares look to be trading on a fairly undemanding valuation for the year to March 2021. Click here to claim your copy of this special report now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Growth Share… free of charge! More reading 3 reasons why the Ocado share price fell 7% last week 1 UK share I’d buy and hold for the next 10 years The Ocado share price has doubled in a year: should I buy on today’s dip? The Ocado share price slumps! Should I buy the stock today? These 2 FTSE 100 shares have leapt over 20% in 30 days. Which would I buy? Zaven Boyrazian does not own shares in Ocado. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Ocado share price is around 2,300p. Would I buy now? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  15. Is the Ocado share price set for a bounce-back with grocers soaring? (25/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The Ocado (LSE: OCDO) share price saw a dramatic slump in mid-February after a great end to 2020. Ocado shares outperformed the FTSE 100 last year, showing an 80% increase in share price. The online grocer started 2021 strong, with the share price growing 26% from 2,287p at the end of 2020 to 2,883p by the end of January 2021. But since then, the share price fell consistently, reading 1,828.5p on 3rd June. This 36.5% decrease brought the share price to a 52-week low, with its market value falling from over £22.3bn to £14.7bn.  If you consider mid-term returns, Ocado shares have given shareholders a whopping 720% return in the five-year period between June 2016 to the present day, making it the #1 performing FTSE stock during this period. In the past year, however, the figure shows a measly +0.08% return. What caused this significant slide, and do I think Ocado stock can recover? Ocado’s focus on robotic warehouses came to fruition during the pandemic, which caused a massive uptick in the share price. The focus on technology-driven retail enabled the company to outperform rivals who struggled to keep up with the growing demands of fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) and ecommerce sales during the Covid-19 lockdown period. This saw the market share of the company grow by 2%.  Ocado CEO Tim Steiner seems to think that the market explosion in H2 of 2020 is not a one-off event triggered by the increase in demand. The company has been poised to take a larger share in the grocery market, with him supporting claims stating that returning users who placed three to five orders on the platform stayed loyal to the brand. The grocer boom This week, a potential buyout deal for  Morrisons caused its share price to explode, increasing by 35%, going from from 178p to 240p. The now rejected £5.5 billion bid from US-based Clayton, Dubilier & Rice for Morrisons boosted the price of other major UK grocers too. Tesco and Sainsbury stock rose 1.7% and 3.8% respectively.  Ocado, which is partnered with Morrisons, also saw a 4.82% uptick in share price in the last five days. I think this increase can be directly attributed to the furore surrounding the takeover news.  Ocado share price risks Despite this short-term boost in the share price and the long-term potential I see in the tech-driven Ocado Smart Platform that facilitates “front-end interface for ordering; automated fulfilment through our CFCs and last-mile operations for delivery” to large grocery retailers across the world, the financials and lawsuits still concern me. The ongoing patent infringement lawsuit by AutoStore Technology against Ocado is worrying, as an unfavourable judgement could halt Ocado’s expansion plans in the UK and US and threaten the validity of the smart platform that the company is built upon. Also, the negative price-to-earnings ratio displayed in the company’s financials and the lack of dividend yield makes me wary of the long-term potential of Ocado shares. Though there is immense potential in its technology, there are too many risks for me to consider Ocado for my portfolio in 2021.  The post Is the Ocado share price set for a bounce-back with grocers soaring? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues Looking for new share ideas? Grab this FREE report now. Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits. From 2015-2019… Revenues increased 38.6%. Its net income went up 19.7 times! Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLED The opportunity here really is astounding. In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer? You could have the full details on this company right now. Grab your free report – while it’s online. More reading How I’d invest £1,000 in 3 FTSE 100 stocks The Ocado share price is sliding! Is it too late to buy the stock? 2 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy with £2k The Ocado share price has crashed 36% in 4 months. Can it recover? Suraj Radhakrishnan has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Morrisons, Ocado Group, and Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  16. The Ocado share price is down 30% in 6 months. 3 reasons I’d buy it now (20/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The FTSE 100 e-grocer Ocado (LSE: OCDO) had a fantastic run in 2020. It saw strong sales growth and the Ocado share price had rallied 164% by September last year from the stock market crash.  In the approximately six months since, however, its share price has fluctuated. It is now down by 30%, as the vaccine discoveries’ led bull run late last year made Covid-19 struck stocks more popular. But there are three reasons that I think the Ocado share price will still turn out to be a winner over time: #1. A long-term investment  The convenience of online shopping, whether for groceries, personal, or household goods, is unmatched. If we were unconvinced earlier, I reckon the one year of lockdowns has shown us otherwise. In other words, the pace of e-commerce adoption just accelerated. The company’s 40% sales growth for the thirteen weeks to 28 February 2021 certainly seems to suggest so.  #2. Sustained sales growth And I do not think that this performance is a one-off either. The company’s revenues were growing even pre-pandemic, though in 2020 the growth accelerated as online deliveries became more popular. Even after the pandemic, Ocado expects growth to continue, even if it is at a slower pace than last year. Importantly, the pandemic has been instrumental in gaining a customer base that would otherwise have taken longer to convince. It expects these customers to stay converts to grocery deliveries. It is loss-making, to be sure, but I am not worried as long as it is growing fast. It has a share of around 15% in UK’s groceries, which is half that of market-leader Tesco’s share, suggesting that has the potential to make gains. Further, it is targeting international markets as well. #3. Ocado share price is just right As a loss-making stock, my preferred yardstick to compare shares, the price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio is not applicable here. Instead, I considered the price-to-sales (P/S) ratio, which is at 6.4 times.  This is actually lower than that for Flutter Entertainment at 6.7 times, another FTSE 100 stock that made big gains during 2020. It is, however, higher than the 4.9 times for AstraZeneca, which touched all-time highs last year.  In other words, the Ocado share price is neither the most expensive nor the cheapest among comparable stocks. In fact, considering that it has fallen a fair bit in recent months, I am even more convinced it is a buy.  What to watch out for My one doubt about the future of the Ocado share price is with regards to its relatively recent partnership with Marks and Spencer (M&S). M&S has seen stagnant to declining business in recent times. Unless Ocado plans to expand to more grocers or  grow its technology platform, I think this can slow it down going forward.  What I would do about Ocado now As it happens, Ocado does indeed plan to expand its technology solutions segment. Moreover, just like it switched over from being a delivery provider for Waitrose to M&S, perhaps it could switch again if the partnership is unviable.  So far though, things look good for it. It is still a buy for me. One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading Top UK shares Ocado Group and Fevertree Drinks are falling today. Here’s what I’d do now Ocado’s share price has fallen. Should I buy the stock now? Ocado shares: a post-pandemic surprise? Ocado was the worst-performing FTSE 100 share in February. Here’s why Top British stocks for March 2021 Manika Premsingh owns shares of AstraZeneca and Ocado Group. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of Flutter Entertainment. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Ocado share price is down 30% in 6 months. 3 reasons I’d buy it now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  17. How I’d target 1,000%+ returns by investing in UK shares (10/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    If this sounds outlandish, I assure you it is not. With enough patience and the right choice of UK shares, it is possible for me to make 1,000% returns on an investment and even more. Here is how I plan to do so. How to select the right shares To put it another way, I can earn my intended 1,000% return on investment if the price of a share I buy increases by 10 times (or more). One indicator that I look at is past share price behaviour.  If a share’s performance has been healthy over time, the company is financially sound, and there are no negative disruptions in the offing for the sector it operates in, then chances are good, in my opinion, that the share will continue to perform. There are several examples among FTSE 100 stocks of this trend, and across sectors ranging from safe ones like healthcare to cyclical ones like retail and everything else in between.  Here are two stocks that have made great investments in the past and I reckon will continue to do so in the future as well. #1. Ocado: right place, right time If I had invested in Ocado (LSE: OCDO) at the average share price during 2011, I would have earned around 1,350% by now. Ocado has benefited from the growing online sales industry. The pandemic only increased its popularity further as ordering groceries in was a safe and convenient option. While its growth is expected to subside this year, there is little doubt that Ocado is still expanding.  This is one reason that, on average, its share price is up 24% from the 2020 average price. Once the lockdown in the UK eases, it may fall from these levels but I think that will be temporary.  The downside, though, is that competition is heating up. Other supermarkets, like Tesco, are seeing a sharp rise in online sales. For the final quarter of 2020, it reported an 80%+ increase in online sales in the UK, compared to a 7.6% overall sales increase for the market. If Ocado is able to maintain its position, I think it will continue to be a rewarding investment over time.  #2. Ashtead: construction boom ahead If I had invested in US-focused construction biggie Ashtead in 2011, my investment would have grown by 2,250% by now. The FTSE 100 stock has seen its share of ups and downs, but broadly it has been on the rise.  Despite some hit to its financials in 2020, I am fairly confident that the Ashtead share will continue to be a good investment. More than half its revenues are from the US, which is slated for high growth this year. While this will partly be a rebound from the dip in 2020, huge government spending on infrastructure creation will be good for Ashtead too.  To conclude, both Ocado and Ashtead would be my go-to stocks for trying to hit the target of 1,000%+ investing returns in the future.  “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading 3 top FTSE tech stocks to buy in April FTSE 100: 3 of the best shares to buy today The Ocado share price is down 30% in 6 months. 3 reasons I’d buy it now Top UK shares Ocado Group and Fevertree Drinks are falling today. Here’s what I’d do now Ocado’s share price has fallen. Should I buy the stock now? Manika Premsingh owns shares of Ocado Group. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group and Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post How I’d target 1,000%+ returns by investing in UK shares appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  18. Sensex, Nifty may start lower amid rising COVID-19 cases; 5 things to know before market opens (05/04/2021 - Financial Express)
    Indian share market benchmarks BSE Sensex and Nifty 50 were likely to start the week on a negative note due to rising COVID-19 cases and stricter curbs in the country.
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  19. : Online grocer Ocado dismisses Amazon as a ‘very smaller competitor’ ahead of first Kroger warehouse launch (18/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    The largest supermarket retailer in the U.S. has teamed up with Ocado to open a series of automated warehouses.
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  20. This FTSE 100 stock is up 806% since 2016. Is it the best UK share to buy today? (24/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    As I explained on Monday, it might seem that it’s not been a great five years for the FTSE 100. The Footsie has gained 530 points since 2016 to trade around 6,618 at Tuesday’s close. That’s a return of 8% for half a decade — an average of 1.6% a year — for taking equity risk. But adding in yearly dividends of around 4% boosts this return to 5.6% a year. That’s a lot better than top savings accounts. However, it’s easily beaten by several foreign stock markets. The US S&P 500 has almost doubled over five years, before dividends. Today, it stands around 100 points below its record high, hit a week ago. FTSE 100: 66 winners and 31 losers since 2016 Then again, not all FTSE 100 shares have disappointed investors these past five years. Some shares have done extremely well, while others have crashed horribly. Of the 97 shares in the FTSE 100 for a full five years, 31 have fallen in value. These declines range from 2.5% to a spectacular crash of 71.8%. Across these 31 losers, the average price decline is almost a quarter (22.9%). This leaves 66 winners, whose share prices have climbed between a tiny 0.1% and a colossal 805.7%. These gainers include 26 shares that have at least doubled in value since 2016. Of these, 12 shares have tripled or more since 2016. The average gain across these FTSE 100 champions is a hefty 122%. Nice. The Footsie’s star performers over five years Using Tuesday’s closing prices, these are the FTSE 100’s five best performers since February 2016. As you can see, each has produced mouth-watering gains for patient investors. Ocado Group (Online grocer) +805.7% Evraz (Steelmaker and miner) +748.8% Anglo American (Global miner)+480.3% Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust (Tech fund) +410.9% Ashtead Group (Equipment rental) +349.5% Would I buy Ocado today? With its share price having risen more than nine-fold since 2016, Ocado is very highly prized today. Right now, this FTSE 100 share stands at 2,335p, down 66p (2.8%). At this level, the online grocer and seller of automated-warehouse technology is valued at £18bn. Tesco, the UK’s biggest and most profitable supermarket by far, is valued at £16.7bn. Why the bumper valuation for Ocado? It’s because Ocado is rated in line with US tech firms, while FTSE 100 rival Tesco is valued as an old-economy business. While Tesco has racked up tens of billions of pounds of profits over decades, Ocado has yet to make a penny. But it’s heading that way — and fast. Since launching in April 2000, Ocado has spent many billions investing in growth over 21 years. And growth stocks are very much favoured by investors nowadays, as we see with sky-high US tech valuations. Furthermore, Ocado kept growing strongly during the pandemic, with sales up more than a third (35%) in 2020. This growth surge shrank Ocado’s pre-tax losses to £44m in 2020, versus £215m in 2019. Likewise, Ocado is moving towards profitability and should be a winner in the inexorable drive towards online shopping. This could lead to a substantial surge in future earnings. But would I buy it? No. Without any historic profits, earnings per share or cash dividends, I can’t value Ocado shares on fundamentals. Indeed, I view Ocado as perhaps the UK’s #1 bubble stock. The shares have fallen 579p — a fifth (19.9%) — from their all-time high of 2,914p on 30 September 2020. Yet even now, I see them as too rich for my blood, so I won’t be buying this FTSE 100 share for my family portfolio! FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading The Ocado share price is around 2,300p. Would I buy now? 3 reasons why the Ocado share price fell 7% last week 1 UK share I’d buy and hold for the next 10 years The Ocado share price has doubled in a year: should I buy on today’s dip? The Ocado share price slumps! Should I buy the stock today? Cliffdarcy has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post This FTSE 100 stock is up 806% since 2016. Is it the best UK share to buy today? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  21. Ocado’s share price has fallen. Should I buy the stock now? (10/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Ocado (LSE: OCDO) is a stock I’ve been keeping a close eye on for a while. That’s because it’s one of the fastest growing companies in the FTSE 100 index, with five-year annualised sales growth of 16.1%. But recently, Ocado’s share price has pulled back. Is this a good opportunity for me to buy? Let’s take a look at the investment case. Ocado’s share price has fallen There are a number of things I like about Ocado. Firstly, it’s generating strong growth in its retail segment. The company’s recent full-year results showed it generated growth of 35% here for the 52 weeks to 29 November. That’s an impressive level of growth. Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) in this division also came in at £148.5m – up 266% year-on-year. Secondly, the group has a unique automation technology offer in its ‘Ocado Smart Platform’ (OSP). This is an end-to-end solution that helps other supermarkets move online. Supermarkets Ocado is currently working with include France’s Groupe Casino, Canada’s Sobeys, and Australia’s Coles. Ocado says seven out of its nine current partners will be using its platform by the end of this financial year. Overall, I think the future looks bright for Ocado. Will online grocery shopping growth continue? That said, there are a few risks that could hit the share price. One is that, post-Covid-19, online supermarket sales could fall as shoppers return to stores. But Ocado’s CEO Tim Steiner believes online grocery shopping is here to stay. He expects online grocery in Britain to double in size again over the next few years. However, not everyone is as bullish as Steiner. For example, Christian Härtnagel, CEO of Lidl GB, believes that online sales growth will moderate in the near term. He believes that as the crisis recedes, so will online grocery penetration. “A lot of people are talking about the new normal, I’m absolutely convinced that we are not in this new normal right now, we are in the temporary normal, we are in an extraordinary time,” he told Reuters recently. Another issue to be aware of is that the OSP is losing money. This is impacting group profitability significantly. Moreover, Ocado is spending a lot of money to invest in this side of the business. Recently, the company told investors that total capital expenditure for the group is expected to be around £700m this year. This large amount of investment appears to be testing investors’ patience and affecting the share price. It’s worth pointing out, however, that Bank of America analysts believe profits from this division will kick in in 2022. That’s not too far away now. Should I buy Ocado shares? Overall, I’m cautiously optimistic on the outlook for Ocado shares. This is a more speculative stock, in my view, because the company is currently losing money. However, after the recent share price pullback, I’m a buyer of the stock. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading Ocado shares: a post-pandemic surprise? Ocado was the worst-performing FTSE 100 share in February. Here’s why Top British stocks for March 2021 2 of the best FTSE 100 shares to buy now and hold for 20 years Can Ocado stock stay strong in a post pandemic world? Edward Sheldon has no position in any shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Ocado’s share price has fallen. Should I buy the stock now? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  22. Can Ocado stock stay strong in a post pandemic world? (25/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The Covid-19 pandemic has proved disastrous for many businesses, forcing closures and driving down profits. One sector that has been hit hardest through persistent lockdowns is the retail sector, with government restrictions forcing retail closures worldwide. The opposite can be said for the online shopping industry, with online sales as a proportion of retailing reaching a record 22.3%. One such stock that has soared as a product of this is Ocado (LSE:OCDO). A pandemic performer Ocado’s earnings have risen 69% comparative to 2019-2020 performance, proving itself as a top FTSE 350 performer throughout the pandemic. Its share price has doubled in value as a result of persistent UK lockdowns and restrictions, as families have turned to online shopping. This has provided a profitable opportunity for many investors throughout 2020. However, with the recent UK government announcement that much of the retail sector will be open by April and the majority of the adult population to be vaccinated by July, do I think Ocado will follow such a bullish trajectory throughout 2021? 2021 and beyond… I think Ocado is set to see a decline in its online shopping sector revenues as competing firms open their doors back up to the public. However, with Ocado offering such a diversified business model, including tech solutions, engineering, and logistics, it certainly offers space to make up for a declining e-commerce role. In addition to this, I believe the 35% increase in revenue throughout 2020 isn’t likely to shrink back to the pre-pandemic levels of 11.5% per annum, meaning Ocado will remain a solid growth stock in future. Though Ocado still currently operates at a loss, it boasts a pretty solid balance sheet, holding £2.1bn in cash to counteract debts of £997m. This shows the company can actively manage debt, which gives me confidence in its management. However, with a price to book ratio of 9.7, it could be considered significantly overvalued compared to competitors Tesco and Sainsbury’s who sit at 1.4 and 0.73 respectively. In addition to this, the company is not exempt to the impacts of Brexit, which is likely to pave the way for future inconvenience through potential food shortages and changes to the UK supply chain. What would I do with Ocado shares? Overall, though still currently slightly overpriced, I think that Ocado can still perform well in a post-pandemic world. Much of the public are likely to continue to use online shopping in the future, which will help counteract the risk of slower growth post lockdown. CEO Tim Steiner has previously stated that Ocado’s target market is worth around £2.8tn, of which its current partners have only a £210m share of, providing plenty of room for further growth. Therefore, I think this stock is still worth buying and holding as a long-term investment in my portfolio in an increasingly online-driven retail sector. A Top Share with Enormous Growth Potential Savvy investors like you won’t want to miss out on this timely opportunity… Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK analyst all fired up about this ‘pure-play’ online business (yes, despite the pandemic!). Not only does this company enjoy a dominant market-leading position… But its capital-light, highly scalable business model has previously helped it deliver consistently high sales, astounding near-70% margins, and rising shareholder returns … in fact, in 2019 it returned a whopping £150m+ to shareholders in dividends and buybacks! And here’s the really exciting part… While COVID-19 may have thrown the company a curveball, management have acted swiftly to ensure this business is as well placed as it can be to ride out the current period of uncertainty… in fact, our analyst believes it should come roaring back to life, just as soon as normal economic activity resumes. That’s why we think now could be the perfect time for you to start building your own stake in this exceptional business – especially given the shares look to be trading on a fairly undemanding valuation for the year to March 2021. Click here to claim your copy of this special report now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Growth Share… free of charge! More reading This FTSE 100 stock is up 806% since 2016. Is it the best UK share to buy today? The Ocado share price is around 2,300p. Would I buy now? 3 reasons why the Ocado share price fell 7% last week 1 UK share I’d buy and hold for the next 10 years The Ocado share price has doubled in a year: should I buy on today’s dip? Dylan Hood does not have any position in the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Can Ocado stock stay strong in a post pandemic world? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  23. The Ocado share price has fallen: should I buy now? (08/07/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The outbreak of the pandemic saw a major rise in the Ocado (LSE: OCDO) share price. However, since hitting an all-time high of 2,914p in February, it has fallen and is currently around 35% lower. Back in March, my fellow Fool Manika Premsingh explained why she was buying Ocado. So does this FTSE 100 stock’s share price still have the potential to rise as we seem to be coming out of the pandemic? Let’s take a look. Ocado opportunities The first positive is that the pandemic has changed consumer behaviour. At its height, many people switched to online grocery shopping. By August last year, more than three-quarters of consumers ordered at least some of their household shopping from supermarket websites. And I suspect many will continue to shop online, which provides opportunities for the Ocado share price to rise. This view is reinforced through the firm’s latest financial results. The half-year results for 2021 showed 21.4% growth in revenue to £1.3bn, highlighting the continued strong performance of the business. It also found itself with what it called ‘’healthy liquidity’’, with a cash balance of £1.7bn. This provides stability, possibly giving investors confidence about the future. However, it’s worth noting that pre-tax losses were around £24m. Since its creation, it has rarely made a profit, which does lead me to question whether Ocado is currently overpriced.  One key point in its favour compared to other grocers that operate online is its customer fulfilment centres.  These allowed Ocado to outperform rivals during the pandemic. Rivals could not always cope with the high demand, but Ocado’s automated systems streamlined the preparation of deliveries. Innovations like this make me optimistic for the future of the business. Ocado share price risks Of course, despite the potential I see, I have to consider the risks too. One major potential risk is a lawsuit the firm’s currently involved in. Norwegian robotics company AutoStore has filed complaints in the UK and US claiming Ocado’s automated warehouse systems infringe its patents. A successful lawsuit would block the import, manufacture, sale, and use of these systems. Sorting out the legal situation will inevitably be a long process, costing the firm money along the way. I believe this could be a reason behind the fall in the Ocado share price and I’m wary that the longer the lawsuit goes on, the more it may continue to fall. To add to this, the grocery market is becoming more competitive, which could pose problems. Supermarket chains like Tesco boosted home delivery in the pandemic, while Amazon has also ventured into grocery with Amazon Fresh. This could have a massive impact on future revenues as these operations potentially poach the firm’s customers, directly impacting the Ocado share price. Should I buy Ocado? I like Ocado, and don’t believe that the sole reason for the rise in share price over the past few years is due to the pandemic. It’s an innovative business model with strengthening financial results. So why is the Ocado share price falling? I pin it down to the lawsuit and that means I won’t be buying yet. I may be missing out on a great opportunity, but I intend to keep Ocado on my watchlist until the outcome of the lawsuit is clearer. The post The Ocado share price has fallen: should I buy now? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading Would I buy Ocado stock after its 30% fall? Is the Ocado share price set for a bounce-back with grocers soaring? How I’d invest £1,000 in 3 FTSE 100 stocks The Ocado share price is sliding! Is it too late to buy the stock? 2 FTSE 100 stocks I’d buy with £2k Charlie Keough does not own shares in any of the mentioned companies. John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Amazon. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group and Tesco and has recommended the following options: long January 2022 $1,920 calls on Amazon and short January 2022 $1,940 calls on Amazon. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  24. : Kroger partner Ocado is on the road to robotic grocery delivery with autonomous-vehicle investment (16/04/2021 - Market Watch)
    High-tech supermarket and logistics group Ocado is pushing toward a future where, from warehouse to doorstep, groceries will be handled by robots.
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  25. As the M&S share price climbs 10%, is it time to buy at last? (27/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Is it a department store? A fashion retailer? A food seller? That’s the identity question that Marks & Spencer (LSE: MKS) has been struggling with for years. Thursday’s results hopefully brought the answer a little closer. And on the whole, the markets liked it, as the M&S share price ended the day up 8.5%, after breaking 10% in earlier trading. It’s still down 37% over the past two years, mind. We heard of falling revenue, a statutory pre-tax loss of £209m, and more stores set to close. Still, on the upside, at least for those wanting M&S to focus on its food offerings and its Ocado tie-up, more stores are set to close. Clothing and home revenues dipped by 31.5% overall, even though online sales gained 53.9%. The optimism is all about food and Ocado. Like-for-like food revenue was up 1.3%. And after excluding hospitality and franchise operations, M&S recorded a like-for-like gain of 6.9%. Possibly key to the market optimism, M&S products made up more than 25% of Ocado’s average basket. But is it wise for investors to tie the M&S share price to the Ocado share price? I’ll come back to that in a moment. More store closures Marks & Spencer has been downsizing its chain of stores and cutting jobs for years. And the company now intends to close 30 more stores over the next 10 years. But M&S also plans some openings and expansions over the next couple of years. So it’s going to be gradual, and not all one-way losses. I suspect it’s too early to guess how those plans will pan out in the coming years anyway, just coming out of the pandemic lockdown. Until we get back to high street business as usual, I won’t have a clue about the true long-term prospects for M&S stores. Or be able to guess at where the M&S share price might go. Having some idea of a rational share price valuation is important to me. That’s because I’ve been watching the Marks & Spencer transformation for years, and I keep thinking it might finally be time for me to buy. M&S share price valuation So what about Ocado? Here’s my concern. The Ocado share price has fallen over the past few months. But the company still has a market cap of around £14.5bn. That’s more than six times Ocado’s 2020 revenue. And it’s not making a profit. Now, Ocado is very hard to value, as investors see it as a technology company rather than just an online retailer, with its online retailing systems being the big attraction. I think that’s fair. But I worry what effect we might see on the M&S share price should Ocado suffer any future tech stock stumbles. While Ocado clearly appeals to growth investors, M&S has traditionally appealed to boring old income and value investors like me. And while the two companies might be good fits in their retail venture, I just get twitchy about seeing the increasing dependency of one on the other. From an investing perspective, that is. So while I can’t see a clear way to value either the M&S share price or the Ocado share price, it’s still not time for me to buy. 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50 Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic… And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains. But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times. Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down… You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm. That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away. Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! More reading Are Marks and Spencer (MKS) shares finally worth buying? Alan Oscroft has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post As the M&S share price climbs 10%, is it time to buy at last? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  26. Zomato share price hits new all-time high, doubles from IPO price; UBS says ‘buy’, sees 12% rally (27/07/2021 - Financial Express)
    Zomato share price jumped nearly 5 per cent today, rising to a fresh record high of Rs 147.80 apiece intraday on NSE
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  27. IRCTC share price hits all-time high, surges three times from IPO price; stock may rally up to 40% (04/03/2021 - Financial Express)
    IRCTC share price hit a new record high of Rs 2,014 apiece, rising as much as 7 per cent in the intraday on BSE.
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  28. The Ocado share price slumps! Should I buy the stock today? (09/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The Ocado (LSE: OCDO) share price has plunged in early deals this morning. Shares in the retailer are trading down around 3% on the day, at the time of writing, a rare pullback for this FTSE 100 champion. Indeed, over the past 12 months, shares in the retailer/tech champion, have returned a staggering 125%. It was the second best performing stock in the UK’s blue-chip index last year.  As such, following today’s performance, I’ve decided to take a closer look at this business. The Ocado share price pullback could offer an excellent opportunity to buy this growth business at a discounted price.  Ocado share price pullback The retailer published its full-year results today, which were full of good news. Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation (EBITDA) were £73m, up nearly double from the year-ago figure of £43m. Group sales jumped by a third to £2.3bn.  Ocado is one of a handful of businesses to come into its own over the past 12 months. At one point, demand for the company’s services was so high, it had to close the door to new customers. Profit at Ocado Retail, the joint venture with Marks & Spencer, jumped from £40m to £148m.   And management is looking to capitalise on its growth last year in 2021. The group is planning to invest £700m over the year, building dozens of new automated fulfilment centres. This will significantly increase the retailer’s footprint. It currently manages three UK facilities that handle its retail joint venture.  Legal challenge  So, the retailer looks to be firing on all cylinders. But it faces challenges. According to today’s results release, higher project costs will hit the firm’s bottom line over the next 12 months. What’s more, the group is currently fighting a legal battle with rival AutoStore. Management expects to incur “significantly higher” near-term legal costs in this fight. This seems to be the main reason for the Ocado share price weakness today.  High costs and technology challenges have always been a risk for the retailer. They’ll likely continue to be so. Despite rising profits as its retail division, analysts don’t expect the group to report an overall profit for several years as tech spending gobbles up retail income.  Then there’s also the battle with AutoStore to consider. The company has accused Ocado of infringing its patents and stealing technology. If these accusations turn out to be correct, it could significantly negatively impact the retailer’s outlook and future potential.  Overall, while I believe the Ocado share price looks like an attractive investment and current levels, I think the business faces several significant headwinds, making it difficult for me to get behind the company right now. Therefore, I’m not a buyer of the stock right now. However, if Ocado’s legal issues are brought to a close, then I may revisit the business, as I’m incredibly excited about its potential to transform the grocery market with technology.  The high-calibre small-cap stock flying under the City’s radar Adventurous investors like you won’t want to miss out on what could be a truly astonishing opportunity… You see, over the past three years, this AIM-listed company has been quietly powering ahead… rewarding its shareholders with generous share price growth thanks to a carefully orchestrated ‘buy and build’ strategy. And with a first-class management team at the helm, a proven, well-executed business model, plus market-leading positions in high-margin, niche products… our analysts believe there’s still plenty more potential growth in the pipeline. Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK investment team all hot-under-the-collar about this tiny £350+ million enterprise… inside a specially prepared free investment report. But here’s the really exciting part… right now, we believe many UK investors have quite simply never heard of this company before! Click here to claim your copy of this special investment report — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Small-Cap Stock… free of charge! More reading These 2 FTSE 100 shares have leapt over 20% in 30 days. Which would I buy? I’d avoid the IAG share price – I think this 2020 top performer will soar further in 2021 Should I chase the Ocado share price higher or listen to Warren Buffet and buy a tracker instead? I think the Ocado share price could crush the FTSE 100 this year Why I’m considering high street retail stocks for my portfolio again Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Ocado share price slumps! Should I buy the stock today? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  29. Why has the Marks & Spencer share price (MKS) jumped 25%? (26/08/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    It’s not often I get to open with a headline about Marks & Spencer (LSE: MKS) spiking upwards. But that’s what’s been happening over the past week. I’m writing this on 26 August. And since the market closed on 19 August, the Marks & Spencer share price has climbed a whopping 26%. So what’s it all about? It seems like only days ago I was looking at the latest trading update, and musing on the 14% price rise of the time. Oh, it was only days ago. The trading update can’t be the only reason for the continuing surge. It was generally positive, with total revenue up 4.4% over the same period in the 2019/20 year. That’s a good comparative, and it shows revenue getting back to pre-pandemic levels, even if the M&S share price isn’t. But we saw the same old story. Despite recent upbeat noises about the company’s fashion ranges, Clothing & Home revenue fell again. This time it dropped 2.6%, and it took food sales to turn the overall figure positive. And that’s because food and groceries retail is in hot demand these days. Takeover contagion The takeover battle for Morrisons has been the trigger. The apparently winning offer values the company at £7bn. And that’s a very nice profit for those who held the shares before the bidding commenced. So, do any of today’s cash-rich US private equity firms have their eyes on the UK flagship high street chain? And could long-suffering shareholders finally get their reward from a fat takeover price with a big premium over the current M&S share price? We obviously can’t know. But that hasn’t stopped speculation moving first to Sainsbury, giving its share price a sharp boost. The enthusiasm also spread to Ocado, M&S’s big partner in the grocery delivery business. Ocado shares haven’t moved up quite so sharply, but it’s a business with a very different valuation model. So, the big question in my mind is… should I buy Marks & Spencer shares now? Well, firstly, I’ll say that I’d never buy a stock purely in the hope of a takeover. Speculation tends to push up prices for all the anticipated targets. But the potential acquisitors aren’t going to have the cash to buy them all, and some speculators will surely be disappointed. M&S share price valuation But I’ll buy a stock if I think it’s undervalued and is one I’d be happy to keep for 10 years. If I’m hoping for a quicker profit than that through a takeover, that would be a bonus. On that score, the Marks & Spencer share price is still down 6% over the past two years, even after the latest sharp rise. So that’s a company whose business is already a little ahead of where it was two years ago, yet the shares are still lagging. Of course, there’s a lot more to it than recovering revenue. I want to see how profits are going. And, of critical importance, I want a close look at the balance sheet. We’ll know more when M&S releases first-half results on 10 November. But if I do buy, it’ll be as a long-term hold, and not just on takeover speculation. The post Why has the Marks & Spencer share price (MKS) jumped 25%? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Inflation Is Coming: 3 Shares To Try And Hedge Against Rising Prices Make no mistake… inflation is coming. Some people are running scared, but there’s one thing we believe we should avoid doing at all costs when inflation hits… and that’s doing nothing. Money that just sits in the bank can often lose value each and every year. But to savvy savers and investors, where to consider putting their money is the million-dollar question. That’s why we’ve put together a brand-new special report that uncovers 3 of our top UK and US share ideas to try and best hedge against inflation… …because no matter what the economy is doing, a savvy investor will want their money working for them, inflation or not! Best of all, we’re giving this report away completely FREE today! Simply click here, enter your email address, and we’ll send it to you right away. More reading The Marks & Spencer (MKS) share price is rising. Should I buy? Should I buy after big Marks & Spencer share price jump? Is the rising Marks and Spencer share price a sign to buy? UK shares to buy now for the recovery Here’s why the Marks & Spencer (MKS) share price is flying today Alan Oscroft has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Morrisons and Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  30. Here’s why the Tesco share price dropped 10% in February (06/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The Tesco (LSE:TSCO) share price has taken a bit of a tumble over the past few weeks. But is this an opportunity to buy the stock at a discount? Let’s take a look at what’s going on and see whether I should consider adding Tesco to my income portfolio. Why did the Tesco share price fall? In December last year, Tesco announced that it had successfully completed the sale of its business in Malaysia and Thailand for $10.6bn (£7.6bn). Following shareholders’ approval at the annual meeting last month, £5bn of the proceeds were paid out via a special dividend. And the rest has been used to bolster the firm’s employee pension fund. The ex-dividend date was set for February 15, with the actual pay date a week or so later. Following this, the Tesco share price fell. Why? Well, if £5bn is removed from a business, then obviously that business is worth £5bn less. Fortunately, this also means that the price drop was not due to any underlying problems with the company. An opportunity to buy Tesco shares cheaply? The Tesco share price is still trading firmly below its pre-pandemic levels. However, whether it will return to a higher price any time soon seems doubtful to me. After all, it was a much larger business back then. But encouragingly, earnings are currently forecast to almost double from 13.8p a share to 23.1p. Combining that with a 5.5% dividend yield and the fact that people will always need groceries certainly makes Tesco look like an attractive long-term income stock to me. At least that’s what I think. But I do have some reservations. A changing grocery landscape According to 2020 forecasts by IGD, the UK food and grocery market will grow by a further 10% this year. While this is not an incredibly high growth rate, it’s still respectable in my eyes. However, a closer inspection of IGD’s analysis makes me question whether Tesco is the right stock to capture this opportunity. It seems that most of this growth is going to be driven by online grocery stores like Ocado and discount shops like Aldi. The growth contribution from supermarkets is only forecast to be around 0.8% — not a particularly exciting figure. Tesco has an online retail solution that proved essential to many individuals throughout the last 12 months. But unlike Ocado, which is the world’s largest dedicated online supermarket, the company has to cover the operating costs of all its physical stores. Needless to say, with nearly 4,000 locations in the UK, that quite a considerable expense. The Tesco share price: buy or not? Assuming that Tesco can deliver an EPS of 23.1p, the P/E ratio of the stock based on today’s price is around 9.5. That seems relatively low to me, suggesting that investors may have over-sold after the special dividend was paid. Therefore at the current share price, despite the rising competition, Tesco is still a company I would consider adding to my income portfolio. But I am quite a fan of growth stocks, and there is one which I think is about to explode… FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading 3 reasons why I think the Tesco Share price could head higher in 2021 Should I buy Tesco shares for my portfolio today? UK share investing: should I buy these 3 FTSE 100 stocks in my ISA? Is the falling Tesco share price a buying opportunity? Tesco’s share price has fallen. Should I buy the stock now? Zaven Boyrazian does not own shares in Tesco or Ocado. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Here’s why the Tesco share price dropped 10% in February appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  31. FTSE 100 investing: 2 bargain buys I’d consider today (25/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    A slew of FTSE 100 companies have released their results today, but investors are not impressed with all of them. Curiously enough, this is despite their posting decent results or their long-term prospects. I think this makes it a good time to consider buying these shares at a bargain. Here are two of them.  #1. Hikma Pharmaceuticals: defensives drop The FTSE 100 drug manufacturer Hikma Pharmaceuticals (LSE:HIK) turned in a broadly robust set of numbers for 2020 today.  Its revenue is up 6% and operating profit has risen by 17%. It has also increased its dividend amount by 15%. Its earnings per share are down, but I would be more worried if this was reflected in the dividends, which it is not. Hikma is also optimistic in its outlook for 2021. Yet, its share price is down almost 6% as I write. I reckon this is for two reasons. One, defensives are out of favour. AstraZeneca, for example, is down 25% from the highs seen in July last year. Hikma too, has witnessed a broad share price softening since the market rally started.  Two, in my observation it sometimes takes a day or two before the results’ impact shows up on the share price. I think that might be the case with Hikma, though other explanations are possible too. For instance, its operating profit is below analysts’ forecasts. We will know more soon.  In the meantime, I think it is a good stock to buy. Actually, going by its financials, any time is a good time to buy it, but more so now when its share price is down. There is, of course, the risk that defensives will remain out of favour as stock markets stay elevated. That would mean that its share price could continue to remain weak.  But I see little chance of that happening.  Hikma shares have a price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of around 10 times right now. As other stocks start looking expensive, I reckon investors will circle back around to the likes of bargain buys like HIK. #2. Mondi: FTSE 100 long-term play The FTSE 100 packaging and paper provider Mondi (LSE: MNDI) released its results too, resulting in a small share price drop. Both its revenues and profits have been impacted in 2020, but I think of Mondi as a long-term play. Its fortunes are tied to the online sales market, which is really the way we will shop in the future. Digital sales have boomed in 2020, acclerating the process. This has positively impacted companies from e-grocers like Ocado to warehousers like Segro. MNDI is no different, which could otherwise have suffered far more in a lockdown.  I think over time it will benefit even more. Investors clearly think so too, going by the fact that its share price recently touched multi-year highs. Moreover, its P/E is still at 11 times right now, indicating that it is a bargain buy compared to many other peers. I think it will start rising again.  The risk I see here is that MNDI is that it may take a while to get its financial act back together. Till then its share price could really languish.  There’s a ‘double agent’ hiding in the FTSE… we recommend you buy it! Don’t miss our special stock presentation. It contains details of a UK-listed company our Motley Fool UK analysts are extremely enthusiastic about. They think it’s offering an incredible opportunity to grow your wealth over the long term – at its current price – regardless of what happens in the wider market. That’s why they’re referring to it as the FTSE’s ‘double agent’. Because they believe it’s working both with the market… And against it. To find out why we think you should add it to your portfolio today… Click here to get access to our presentation, and learn how to get the name of this 'double agent'! More reading Should I buy these two FTSE 100 UK shares on merger rumours? UK stock investing: the best FTSE 100 growth share to buy now 3 UK shares I’d buy right now in my ISA Manika Premsingh owns shares of AstraZeneca and Ocado Group. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Hikma Pharmaceuticals. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post FTSE 100 investing: 2 bargain buys I’d consider today appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  32. 1 UK share I’d buy and hold for the next 10 years (13/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    FTSE 100 online retailer Ocado (LSE: OCDO) released its results for its 2020 financial year earlier this week. These showed continued robust growth. But this UK share’s price hasn’t exactly soared since.  To me, this raises a question: Do investors now think that Ocado’s growth spurt is over? It has seen a sharp sales increase in the lockdowns, as online shopping became both the safer and the more convenient option for consumers.  The question is important for me as a long-term investor because a growing company’s share price is far more likely to continue its upward trajectory and vice versa.  3 ways to assess OCDO’s future share price trajectory To assess this, I looked at it in three ways. The first was to compare the sales performance pre-pandemic with that now. The second was to consider its outlook for 2021, and the third was to take a broad look at the growth prospects for the industry it operates in.  Sales growth Ocado’s sales for its 2020 financial year showed an almost 33% growth rate, which is significantly faster than that seen in the past years. On average, its revenue growth was at 11.5% in the last three years. This suggests that there could be a slow down in growth after the pandemic is over.  However, it’s likely that some consumers who were buying groceries in-store earlier have converted to online purchases now. This is corroborated by a survey OCDO mentions in its release. As per this, 7 out of 10 first-time customers in the US said they will continue with the practice of online shopping even after the pandemic.  Outlook for the next year Following from here, I would think that even if OCDO’s sales growth does decline, it could still be higher than it was earlier. Which brings me to the second point, its outlook.  Ocado doesn’t give a clear picture of its expected retail revenue, its big revenue generator. It just says that that is dependent on Covid-19-related restrictions.  I think this further confirms that some decline in sales can be expected. This is further backed up by analyst estimates as compiled by the Financial Times, according to which revenue for 2021 will grow by 17.4%.  Forecasts are, of course, subject to change, as the overall environment alters, so they can’t be taken as a given. However, they can add to the overall picture.  Long-term opportunities for OCDO Even though this growth rate is a decline from 2020, I think it does continue to support the overall growth story for Ocado. This is especially so since it’s in an expanding industry. This brings me to the third point.  Ocado estimates its target market has a size of £2.8trn, of which its current partners have a 7.5% market share. This leaves a significant opportunity. It also sees opportunities outside groceries, such as in apparel.  I’m a believer in the OCDO story. It’s even my stock for 2021, and so far its share price is up around 15% in the year. I’ve bought this UK share and plan to hold it for the long term, even though I’m aware that there’s a risk from slowing growth post lockdowns. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading The Ocado share price has doubled in a year: should I buy on today’s dip? The Ocado share price slumps! Should I buy the stock today? These 2 FTSE 100 shares have leapt over 20% in 30 days. Which would I buy? I’d avoid the IAG share price – I think this 2020 top performer will soar further in 2021 Should I chase the Ocado share price higher or listen to Warren Buffet and buy a tracker instead? Manika Premsingh owns shares of Ocado Group. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post 1 UK share I’d buy and hold for the next 10 years appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  33. 2 reasons why I think the Marks & Spencer share price could soar in 2021 (02/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Marks & Spencer (LSE:MKS) is a well-known household brand. It’s been around since 1884, and sells a wide variety of products ranging from food to clothing and furniture. But the Marks & Spencer share price has been on a downward trend since late 2015. This saw the company slip out of the FTSE 100 index in 2019, which was a big blow from a reputational point of view. But I see promising signs starting to appear that are making me consider buying the stock now. Food There are two main elements on which I’m pinning the turnaround potential for the Marks & Spencer share price. The first one is food. UK Food sales for the 2019/20 full year were up 2.1%, with like-for-like growth of 1.9%. Although this might not sound like an incredible growth figure, it is a standout considering that group profit before tax was down 20.1%.  Going forward, I think that focusing on the food arm could be a source of long-term growth for the company. To this end, the partnership with Ocado will really help. The deal was signed in 2019, but will take its time to really get going. The access to Ocado’s delivery and distribution network is a real structural benefit. Added to this are the other intangible benefits that Marks & Spencer are getting from ideas and synergies that naturally occur with a partnership. The risk to my view on this element is that food sales alone might not be enough to move the Marks & Spencer share price higher. They did account for around 60% of 2019/20 revenue, but that leaves 40% in other areas. If these underperform as they have done, it could make growth in food slightly redundant. Online sales The second part of the business that I think could help boost the Marks & Spencer share price this year is growth in online sales. In March, the business announced it was launching new websites, to target international consumers in 46 new markets.  I think this is a smart move, especially considering the latest trading update that covered the six months to the end of September 2020. Online sales were up 75% during this period. Given the issues that the company has been facing, along with reduced headcount, online growth makes sense. It’s a low-cost way of getting access to international markets, particularly when trying to stem its losses in the clothing department. The risk here is that the boost in online sales may be overhyped due to Covid-19. This may taper off in coming months as lockdowns are eased. But I think the Marks & Spencer share price could rise as both areas start to perform. Over the past 12 months, the share price is up 41%. It’s still way off levels that saw it trade in the FTSE 100 a few years back. Yet I think there’s scope for the share price to move considerably higher this year, so I’d buy the stock now. A Top Share with Enormous Growth Potential Savvy investors like you won’t want to miss out on this timely opportunity… Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK analyst all fired up about this ‘pure-play’ online business (yes, despite the pandemic!). Not only does this company enjoy a dominant market-leading position… But its capital-light, highly scalable business model has previously helped it deliver consistently high sales, astounding near-70% margins, and rising shareholder returns … in fact, in 2019 it returned a whopping £150m+ to shareholders in dividends and buybacks! And here’s the really exciting part… While COVID-19 may have thrown the company a curveball, management have acted swiftly to ensure this business is as well placed as it can be to ride out the current period of uncertainty… in fact, our analyst believes it should come roaring back to life, just as soon as normal economic activity resumes. That’s why we think now could be the perfect time for you to start building your own stake in this exceptional business – especially given the shares look to be trading on a fairly undemanding valuation for the year to March 2021. Click here to claim your copy of this special report now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Growth Share… free of charge! More reading Is this news just what’s needed to boost the Marks & Spencer share price? I’d avoid the MKS share price and buy these cheap UK stocks instead jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post 2 reasons why I think the Marks & Spencer share price could soar in 2021 appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  34. I think the Marks and Spencer share price recovery is just starting (01/09/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Last month, one of the best performing investments on the market was the Marks and Spencer (LSE: MKS) share price. During August, shares in the retailer added around 35%.  Investors rushed to buy the stock after the company upgraded its profit guidance for the first time this century. I think this could be just the start of a much longer run higher for the stock.  Performance improvement In 1979, Warren Buffett wrote: “Both our operating and investment experience cause us to conclude that turnarounds seldom turn.” The billionaire investor was speaking from experience after trying and failing to turn around several businesses throughout his career.  Since then, he has advised investors to avoid these situations, especially when it comes to retailers.  This mentality has always led me to the conclusion that M&S will never return to its former glory. And that seemed to be true until this year. It now looks as if the company’s plans are starting to yield results.  In an unscheduled trading update published towards the end of August, the retailer informed the market that profit before tax for the current year would be “above the upper end of previous guidance of £300m-350m.”  The group has seen a substantial recovery across all business lines. The food business, which has a partnership to supply groceries with Ocado, has seen sales leap 10% above pre-pandemic levels. Meanwhile, clothing and home sales have rebounded. They are now just 2.6% below 2019 levels.  It seems as if the group, which has been working on a turnaround for as long as I can remember, is finally heading in the right direction. The Marks and Spencer share price reflects this. The partnership with Ocado is yielding results. Store closures have helped reduce costs, and customers seem to like its clothing and home offering.  Management is working on other initiatives that could only help reinforce the firm’s position in the market. Growth initiatives Last year it launched a new business unit, known as MS2. This division aims to bring together online, data and digital capability to ramp up fashion and homeware sales through bricks-and-mortar stores. It is trialling the technology at several stores, and a further rollout is planned. Video retailing is also being trialled to help customers shop from home.  It looks to me as if the retailer is firing on all cylinders. That is why I believe the Marks and Spencer share price can push higher. If the company’s turnaround continues to yield results, investors may continue to drive the stock higher.  That being said, the retailer’s growth is not guaranteed. The industry is incredibly competitive, and just because the company is making progress does not mean that it will continue to do so. Cost inflation may also eat into profit margins, destabilising the organisation’s recovery.  Despite these risks, I would buy the stock for my portfolio as a recovery play. I am willing to go against Buffett’s advice just this once, considering M&S’s recent progress.  The post I think the Marks and Spencer share price recovery is just starting appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Our 5 Top Shares for the New “Green Industrial Revolution" It was released in November 2020, and make no mistake: It’s happening. The UK Government’s 10-point plan for a new “Green Industrial Revolution.” PriceWaterhouse Coopers believes this trend will cost £400billion… …That’s just here in Britain over the next 10 years. Worldwide, the Green Industrial Revolution could be worth TRILLIONS. It’s why I’m urging all investors to read this special presentation carefully, and learn how you can uncover the 5 companies that we believe are poised to profit from this gargantuan trend ahead! Access this special "Green Industrial Revolution" presentation now More reading Top British stocks for September Why has the Marks & Spencer share price (MKS) jumped 25%? The Marks & Spencer (MKS) share price is rising. Should I buy? Should I buy after big Marks & Spencer share price jump? Is the rising Marks and Spencer share price a sign to buy? Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  35. 2 FTSE 100 stocks to buy (24/08/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Some investors avoid the FTSE 100 as there are only a limited number of technology stocks in the index. Rather than avoiding the index entirely, I’d still own other FTSE 100 companies, but I’d devote the majority of my portfolio to these technology businesses.  There are two, in particular, I’d focus my efforts on.  FTSE 100 technology stock The first is property portal Rightmove (LSE: RMV). This enterprise owns one of the most visited websites in the country, rightmove.com. This gives it a tremendous competitive advantage and edge over peers when competing for business. Estate agents almost have to list their properties with the site. That means it can charge what it wants, to a certain extent.  And as the property market has boomed over the past year, Rightmove’s profits have surged. For the six months ended 30 June, basic earnings per share rose 7%. As profits have increased, the company has started returning more cash to investors. It returned £128m in the first half of 2021, up from £54m in 2019. As the FTSE 100 company continues to dominate its position at the top of the property market (it has a market share of 90%), I think this trend of rising earnings and cash returns will continue.  That said, the business can’t take its advantage for granted. Peers are constantly fighting for market share, spending millions in the process. Rightmove also needs to keep spending on marketing or the group could start to fall behind. The company could also suffer if the property market experiences a slowdown, which would reduce the demand for its services.  Despite these risks, I would buy the tech champion for my portfolio today.  Growth potential As well as Rightmove, I’d also buy grocery retailer Ocado (LSE: OCDO) for my portfolio of FTSE 100 stocks. I think it’s difficult to overestimate how much of a positive impact the pandemic has had on this enterprise. Before the pandemic, Ocado was struggling to build market share in the fiercely competitive UK retail market. However, as the country locked down in the first half of last year, it couldn’t meet demand. And it’s stepped up to the challenge. Even though it temporarily stopped taking on new customers last year, the company has responded by expanding operations to meet growing customer demand. What’s more, new customers have stayed with the business. Retail earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation increased more than 100% in the first half of 2021, compared to the same period last year. This growth helped the company cut its overall loss before tax for the period by 40%.  Clearly, the company has something customers want. Therefore, I feel that as long as management continues to do what it’s doing, the firm should continue to grow.  Still, as noted above, the UK retail sector is highly competitive, and this competition could weigh on Ocado’s growth. Also, costs are rising, which could hurt the organisation’s profit trajectory. Then investors need to consider the legal threats to Ocado as peers are suing the company regarding its robotic technology.  Even after taking these risks and challenges into account, I’d buy the FTSE 100 stock for my portfolio today.  The post 2 FTSE 100 stocks to buy appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Our 5 Top Shares for the New “Green Industrial Revolution" It was released in November 2020, and make no mistake: It’s happening. The UK Government’s 10-point plan for a new “Green Industrial Revolution.” PriceWaterhouse Coopers believes this trend will cost £400billion… …That’s just here in Britain over the next 10 years. Worldwide, the Green Industrial Revolution could be worth TRILLIONS. It’s why I’m urging all investors to read this special presentation carefully, and learn how you can uncover the 5 companies that we believe are poised to profit from this gargantuan trend ahead! Access this special "Green Industrial Revolution" presentation now More reading The Ocado share price: is this the beginning of another rally? UK shares to buy now for the recovery This FTSE 100 stock’s half-year report was excellent. Should I buy shares? Rightmove’s share price has surged. Is the stock still a buy? 2 FTSE 100 companies with strong competitive advantages Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group and Rightmove. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  36. RIL share price at new record high on stake buy in Strand Life Sciences; rallies 10% in 4 days (06/09/2021 - Financial Express)
    RIL share price surged to a fresh record high at Rs 2,479.85 apiece yet again on BSE intraday, rising nearly 4 per cent.
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  37. TCS share price hits new record high, m-cap tops Rs 13.5 lakh crore; should you book profit? (25/08/2021 - Financial Express)
    TCS share price hit a fresh record high of Rs 3,697 apiece, rising over 2 per cent in the intraday deals on BSE.
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  38. 1 ‘hack’ to get almost £5 off your Ocado shop (04/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The “bag of bags” is the bane of most households. You know the one, kept under the sink or shoved away into a similarly small nook or cranny. Seemingly close to bursting at the seams every time you ram yet another carrier bag in to join the countless others. Well, now Ocado is waging war against the bag of bags – and your bank balance could be the beneficiary! The online grocery delivery firm is resuming its recycling scheme from Monday 8th March, with the plastic bags it collects to be sent to a recycling plant and turned into pellets used to create new bags in turn. So far, so good for the environment! But the kicker is that Ocado will now refund the 5p it charges for every carrier bag sent in each delivery. All shoppers need to do is to gather their unwanted plastic bags into one (don’t worry, this bag of bags won’t hang around for long) and inform the delivery driver how many Ocado bags are being returned. They’ll then arrange the refund at their end. What’s more, they’ll even take carrier bags from other companies. You won’t get any money back for these, but at least you won’t have to find an alternative recycling route! So where does the “almost £5” come in? Well, Ocado will take up to 99 of its bags back after each delivery. That works out as a tasty £4.95! For more money-saving grocery tips, check out these 10 from MyWalletHero contributor Sean LaPointe. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading FTSE 100 dividend stocks: why I’d buy shares in this company yielding almost 6% 2021 market crash: 4 things I’m doing now just in case Alcohol and fuel duty frozen: what this means for you 2 reasons why Greatland Gold (GGP) shares could head higher this year The GME share price: have we seen the bottom? The post 1 ‘hack’ to get almost £5 off your Ocado shop appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  39. Call Options Example? (14/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I’m learning Call Options and wanted to see if I am understanding this correctly before I start trading. Currently, I’m looking at a stock that trades at around $30.00 per share. There is an option contract with a Strike Price of $35.00 for $6.40 per contract and expires May 21 2021 If I purchase only one option contract, the total amount would be $640.00. But to just break even, the share price needs to be at least $41.40 ($35+$6.40) correct? If the share price falls below $41.40 when the contract expires, I would lose all of the $640. Thanks in advance for your help.   submitted by   /u/ShyGai83 [link]   [comments]
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  40. Will the Auto Trader share price rally more? Here’s what I think (11/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    It has been a great week for Auto Trader (LSE: AUTO) at the stock market. The FTSE 100 e-marketplace for automobiles has seen a 13% increase in share price in a week. That it is up around 17% over the year, puts the extent of this rise in context. Yesterday alone, it rose by 6.6%. The Auto Trader share price is now at all-time highs.  The latest increase follows the release of its full-year results for the year ending 31 March 2021. At first glance, it could appear surprising that the Auto Trader share price responded so swiftly and positively to clearly weak numbers. Its revenue fell by 29% and pre-tax profit was down 37% compared to the year before.  Positive about the current year The reaction, in my view, is not to what has happend but to the improved outlook for Auto Trader. As I went through the results, two statements stood out. One, that the pandemic is having little impact on its financial performance for the current year, at least so far. As the economy picks up further during the year, I reckon that the company can continue to perform. This is particularly because travel is now possible again after over a year of confinement. For the 12 months to March 2021, new car registrations fell by almost 25%, which could change. Also, low interest rates could encourage consumers to buy cars.  Robust long-term prospects Two, it expects to be a beneficiary of the shift towards online buying for cars over the long term. A version of this statement was also made by CEO Nathan Coe, who said that “There has been a dramatic shift towards buying online, which means we now have more buyers than ever turning to Auto Trader”.  I am a believer in the potential of the online industry. The number of companies that rely on technology for sales will only grow over time. This is especially so for multinationals, which are expanding into newer markets. This is why I hold shares of companies like Ocado, Rightmove, and Deliveroo. Auto Trader can be seen under the same umbrella. Much like Ocado is an e-grocer and Rightmove is a property e-marketplace, Auto Trader is an e-auto seller. So over the long term, I think it could be a good buy for my portfolio.  Possible pandemic impact for the Auto Trader share price I will keep an eye out for any ongoing impact of the coronavirus on its future numbers. The pandemic is not over yet. And auto sales come under discretionary demand. This means that consumers will cut back on these purchases first if there is a surge in Covid-19 again.  Also, to me, the sudden share price increase looks unsustainable. The Auto Trader share has merit, without a doubt, but I think its share price will fall from the current highs. I think then will be a good time to buy the stock, even with the continued pandemic risk.  I would buy it on a dip. The post Will the Auto Trader share price rally more? Here’s what I think appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading Auto Trader’s share price soars to record highs after FY results 3 FTSE 100 stocks to buy in June Manika Premsingh owns shares of Deliveroo Holdings Plc, Ocado Group, and Rightmove. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Auto Trader, Ocado Group, and Rightmove. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  41. 3 UK growth stocks I’d buy now (11/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    UK growth stocks are often seen as the backbone to a good stocks portfolio. This is because a growth stock (on average) offers higher returns than a mature stock. To balance this higher return, I need to be happy taking on higher risk too. The volatility with growth stocks tends to be quite high, with some larger moves downwards likely to test my patience. But I do think such stocks are worth owning, so here are some of my favourites to buy now. Focusing on consumer favourites Greggs (LSE: GRG) is a UK bakery chain that is pushing on with a growth strategy. Even with the temporary closures of stores last year, the business actually opened 28 shops (net) in 2020. Greggs is aiming to open 150 this year to further drive market share. I think the outlook for this growth stock is positive when I take into account other initiatives beyond physical stores. It has diversified into offering products in supermarkets, and taking advantage of home delivery.  One risk though is the very competitive market it operates in. It competes against local and national companies in the same space, and so is always at risk of losing business. Another UK growth stock I’m considering is Entain (LSE: ENT). The gambling and sports betting company has registered impressive share price gains. Over the past year, the share price is up 121%! As the 2020 results noted, it has seen 20 consecutive quarters of double-digit online net gaming revenue growth. Even with physical shops closed, the company has been able to lean on the online side of the business to help deliver revenue. With shops now starting to open, I think the outlook is positive to capitalise on retaining online users as well as adding new in-store customers. One concern I do have is the expansion into other countries such as Portugal and the Baltics. Entain has to be careful not to spread itself too thinly across geographies, and be a victim of its own success. A UK growth stock that’s seen a price correction Ocado Group (LSE: OCDO) was a favoured stock of mine at the start of last year, and I have owned it in the past. For the second half of last year, I thought it was overvalued, and wrote on the topic. It almost had the same market capitalisation as Tesco, despite Tesco having a market share of 27%. Ocado shares have since corrected lower, down 23% over the past six months (up 11% over a year). I think current levels make it a good UK growth stock to consider buying.  Q1 2021 results showed retail revenue growth of almost 40%. Interestingly, the partnership with Marks & Spencer is doing well, with its products accounting for over 25% of the average basket. I think strong growth can continue, and my only concern is how much of the growth over the past year was lockdown-driven. Based on a fairer valuation via a lower share price, I think the market has already priced in some of this. Therefore, I’m not too concerned about ove- paying for this UK growth stock. I’d consider buying all three of the above mentioned growth stocks, to build on a stronger UK (and global) economy as we move through 2021. A Top Share with Enormous Growth Potential Savvy investors like you won’t want to miss out on this timely opportunity… Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK analyst all fired up about this ‘pure-play’ online business (yes, despite the pandemic!). Not only does this company enjoy a dominant market-leading position… But its capital-light, highly scalable business model has previously helped it deliver consistently high sales, astounding near-70% margins, and rising shareholder returns … in fact, in 2019 it returned a whopping £150m+ to shareholders in dividends and buybacks! And here’s the really exciting part… While COVID-19 may have thrown the company a curveball, management have acted swiftly to ensure this business is as well placed as it can be to ride out the current period of uncertainty… in fact, our analyst believes it should come roaring back to life, just as soon as normal economic activity resumes. That’s why we think now could be the perfect time for you to start building your own stake in this exceptional business – especially given the shares look to be trading on a fairly undemanding valuation for the year to March 2021. Click here to claim your copy of this special report now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Growth Share… free of charge! More reading The Greggs (GRG) share price jumped 15% on strong results. Should I buy the shares now? 2 of the best UK reopening stocks to buy now! The Greggs (GRG) share price is rocketing. Here’s why The Ocado share price has crashed 31% in 3 months. Will OCDO rebound? 3 FTSE 250 stocks I’d buy in May jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Tesco and Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post 3 UK growth stocks I’d buy now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  42. Nureca share price hits upper circuit for 4th straight day; investors money more than doubled so far in April (22/04/2021 - Financial Express)
    Nureca share price hit the upper circuit for the fourth consecutive day on Thursday, rising 5 per cent to Rs 1,218.60 apiece
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  43. Is the Ocado share price set for a comeback? (25/08/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Ocado (LSE: OCDO) shares are showing signs of recovery. In July, share prices fell 39% from January’s all-time high of 2,883p. But a recent surge means Ocado’s shares are up 11.2% in the last month and 10.1% in the last five days, currently trading at 2,057p. Could the online supermarket carry this momentum forward and rebound back to the 2,500p levels?  Financials Normalising buying trends after the lift in lockdown restrictions and the release of H1 2021 financials on 6 July triggered a fall in share prices. Shareholders responded to the reported losses which caused the 10% slide immediately after financials were released. Pre-tax losses in H1 2021 did narrow from £40.6m (H1 2020) to £23.6m (H1 2021). This can be attributed to the 37% increase in revenue generated during the first quarter of 2021, driven by a large increase in the active customer base during the pandemic. But, revenue figures have slowed down considerably in the second quarter with only a 7% reported increase. Both quarters combined, overall growth in revenue for H1 2021 stands at 20%. I predict a further drop in sales revenue in H2 of 2021 as buying patterns normalise. Consumers can now eat at restaurants and shop in-store and I believe this will affect Ocado’s sales. Although orders per week grew 20% to 356,000 in H1 of 2021, a significant 23% drop in basket size is reflective of post-pandemic life. Optimising for the future Ocado’s board are highly optimistic about retaining the consumer base generated during the pandemic. The company is investing heavily in technology to optimize its robot-powered warehouses. The $287m purchase of Haddington Dynamics and Kindred Systems shows a vision for the future of e-commerce with Tim Steiner, CEO of Ocado, stating that “the robotic pick opportunity in online grocery is of huge value to us and our clients globally”. I think the investment in smart warehouses will benefit the business in the future. But, as a result of the expansion, the company is expecting a further £30m drop in overall revenue in 2021. This could cause another fall in share prices after H2 financials are released. Ocado’s sole reliance on increased grocery retail to cover for losses is concerning to me as a potential investor. Would I buy Ocado shares?  The share price increase over the past week shows how highly sought-after the tech-driven grocer still is. But can the company sustain shareholder confidence if poor revenue figures continue? Fellow fool Jonathan Smith argues that the £19.3bn valuation is inflated at the current share price. I believe that unfavourable financials in H2 2021 could force shareholders to consider this inflated valuation, triggering a sell-off. My investing strategy involves targeting companies with robust financials and a steady history of profits. In my opinion, Ocado offers neither. Also, it faces stiff competition from Sainsbury’s and Tesco. These companies have a larger market share and remained profitable through the pandemic. I think Ocado’s competitors are a better investment in the supermarket space at the moment.  Although I can see potential in Ocado’s future-focussed, tech-driven warehousing model, I would not add its shares to my portfolio today. The post Is the Ocado share price set for a comeback? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading 2 FTSE 100 stocks to buy The Ocado share price: is this the beginning of another rally? UK shares to buy now for the recovery Suraj Radhakrishnan has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group and Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  44. How I’d invest £1,000 in 3 FTSE 100 stocks (22/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The FTSE 100 index, which includes the UK’s top 100 publicly listed companies by market capitalisation, continues to inch up. On a day-to-day basis, the index changes may not appear significant at all. But when I look back, it has come a long way. From October 2020 to now, the index is up 21%. It has made steady gains every single month except one.  I think this is an ideal time to buy stocks. If stock markets were rising too fast, then I would risk buying too late, when there was not much upside left. Growth or income? When deciding how to invest, I like to take a top-down approach. This means I like to divide my investment into both growth and income stocks. The ratio is dependent on where we are in the economic cycle. Right now, we are due for a cyclical upturn. This means that companies should show improved performance.  At this point, I favour growth stocks. However, it is also essential to bear in mind that dividend payouts rise as companies’ demand increases. So if I buy stocks now that I think can increase their dividends later, my dividend yield can be quite high. There may be some wait, but for good reason. So, with £1,000 to invest, I would put around £700 in growth stocks and £300 in income stocks. Of the £700 meant for growth investments, I would buy two stocks. Ideally, it is great to buy FTSE 100 stocks that have dipped, but are otherwise fundamentally sound.  3 stocks I’d invest in One of them is the food delivery provider Just Eat Takeaway. Briefly, it is a mammoth company now, after completing its takeover of US-based Grubhub. It is loss-making, but I reckon that is because it is fast growing. I have written about it in some detail in another article today.  So I would rather focus on the other growth stock that I like, Ocado. Ocado was 2020’s star stock. As a grocery delivery provider, it saw a huge surge in demand last year as we were housebound. But its fortunes have dipped this year. In fact, today its share price is almost 4% below what it was a year ago. To some extent, this has to do with a slowing down in its sales growth this year as life goes back to normal. But it also has to do with rotation out of stocks that were popular last year. I think the case for food delivery providers stays strong. Consumers are expected to move to online shopping in increasing numbers, and Ocado is well placed to meet this demand.  The income stock I like is Royal Dutch Shell, whose yield was at one time at a huge 10.7%, pre-pandemic. It is presently at 3.3%. I get that oil companies’ long-term future faces a huge question mark as we move away from fossil fuels. But for the foreseeable future, it will do well as the economy expands. And with that, it is likely that its dividend will rise too, I reckon.  The post How I’d invest £1,000 in 3 FTSE 100 stocks appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues Looking for new share ideas? Grab this FREE report now. Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits. From 2015-2019… Revenues increased 38.6%. Its net income went up 19.7 times! Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLED The opportunity here really is astounding. In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer? You could have the full details on this company right now. Grab your free report – while it’s online. More reading Can this FTSE 100 stock bounce back? The Deliveroo share price: 3 reasons to worry The Ocado share price is sliding! Is it too late to buy the stock? The Shell vs BP share price rated Never sell Shell? I just sold my RDSB shares Manika Premsingh owns shares of Ocado Group and Royal Dutch Shell B. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Just Eat Takeaway.com N.V. and Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  45. 1 FTSE 100 stock to buy in August (28/07/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Many FTSE 100 shares’ prices have risen over the past year. This is no surprise. The pandemic was raging and stock markets were bearish last year. And they are quite healthy now, by comparison. But some stocks have risen more than others. Like the packaging provider Smurfit Kappa (LSE: SKG), whose share price is up 64% from a year ago.  Investors like Smurfit Kappa’s results It can rise even more, considering investor reaction to its latest results. It reported its half-year results for 2021 today, which showed an 11% revenue increase and an 8% increase in its pre-tax profits compared to the same time last year. Notably, its net debt to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortisation, commonly known as EBITDA, declined to 1.6 times from 2.1 times last year.  Investors have given its results a thumbs up, increasing its share price by 1.1% as I write. This may change before the end of today’s trading session, but for now it appears that the update is seen as more positive than not.  Macro positives to the FTSE 100 stock As an investor with a top-down perspective, I like two macro aspects to the Smurfit Kappa stock in particular. The first relates to prices. Inflation has been a cause of concern across FTSE 100 companies in the past few months. Other packaging providers like Mondi and DS Smith have referred to rising paper prices, and so has Smurfit Kappa. It comes up again in its latest update. But this time, so does corrugated price recovery. This indicates that it has the pricing power to pass on increased costs to its end consumers. In other words, its profits need not get squeezed because it has to absorb rising costs.  Next, I also like its long-term story. As a believer in the idea that e-commerce companies will continue to grow, and fast, over time, I also believe companies associated with them would grow with them. Smurfit Kappa has already benefited from the boom in online sales last year.  And it is still going strong. Recent updates on online sales from e-grocer Ocado and retailer Next show robust growth. Amazon’s results due tomorrow are expected to show the same. This bodes well for packaging providers.  What can go wrong Still, I think for the short term it is reasonable to factor in some softening in growth. This is because the true impact of easing restrictions and vaccinations will start showing up on the economy only now. And it is only by next quarter we will know how the story plays out.  Also, at present policy makers believe that inflation is a transitory threat. They expect it to subside over the next few months, but there is one set of economists that believes otherwise. It remains to be seen how this plays out, too.  My takeaway On the whole though, I think there is much to like about Smurfit Kappa. Its share price increase may be slower from here, but I continue to see it is as a long-term gainer. The post 1 FTSE 100 stock to buy in August appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading 2 FTSE 100 shares to buy now in this market volatility John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Manika Premsingh owns shares of Ocado Group. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Amazon and Next. The Motley Fool UK has recommended DS Smith and Ocado Group and has recommended the following options: long January 2022 $1,920 calls on Amazon and short January 2022 $1,940 calls on Amazon. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  46. How I’d invest £10,000 in UK shares for passive income (09/08/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Making my money stretch that bit further by investing in UK shares with high growth potential can be a great way for me to generate passive income for the years to come.  In this article, I look at the industries I believe are worth investing in, and the shares I think could grow considerably in the next five to 10 years. Let’s say I have £10,000 to allocate, here’s how I’d do it.  Choosing the industries First, I’d pick the sectors that I think are going to be in high demand. This way, I can take a look at the growth potential of the market as a whole, instead of just an individual share. Further, if a share I choose is a low performer, then at least the wider segment’s success could potentially drive share price growth.  Here are the industries that I believe show potential for growth:  Cybersecurity:  Demand for this sector is clearly high as revenue for UK cybersecurity companies is rising every year. One thing to bear in mind though is that cyber attacks are constantly changing so individual companies may find it hard to keep a competitive advantage.  E-commerce: Offline retail growth is almost non-existent as the e-commerce market continues to develop. That said, we could see some pullback in this sector as pandemic restrictions are lifted.  Renewable Energy: The pandemic and some extreme weather have made many world leaders realise the damage we’re doing to the earth. I expect demand in this sector to skyrocket, driven by consumer demand and legislation. That said, profitable growth in this area could be slow and due to reinvesting, dividend returns might be marginal.  Choosing my UK shares Now let’s look at the shares that I’m selecting. In the cybersecurity sector, I’m looking at BAE Systems and Avast. Both of these share prices have risen since the start of 2021 and the firms are performing well financially. BAE Systems could run into some ESG issues in the future however, and the Avast share price might see some volatility if Norton‘s bid falls through.  For my online retail UK shares, I would add Boohoo and Ocado to my portfolio. Ocado is developing rapidly, but due to its investment in growth, it’s losing money at the moment. Boohoo, on the other hand, is reporting good revenue and profits growth. But both of these companies will have to face strong competition from the likes of Amazon and Zalando.  The ESG companies I would pick are The Renewables Infrastructure Group and ITM Power. Renewables Infrastructure has a well established basis with investments in solar, wind and battery storage, however the share price isn’t exactly cheap with a 10% premium to Net Asset Value (NAV). ITM is generating a lot of revenue, but the company is relying on unsigned deals that could fall through.  These are the UK shares and industries that I believe have great potential to grow in the next decade. Generally speaking, they’re all in some way reliant on the new technological era we find ourselves in. I believe that right now the global economy is only seeing the baby steps of what’s to come.  The post How I’d invest £10,000 in UK shares for passive income appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Our 5 Top Shares for the New “Green Industrial Revolution" It was released in November 2020, and make no mistake: It’s happening. The UK Government’s 10-point plan for a new “Green Industrial Revolution.” PriceWaterhouse Coopers believes this trend will cost £400billion… …That’s just here in Britain over the next 10 years. Worldwide, the Green Industrial Revolution could be worth TRILLIONS. It’s why I’m urging all investors to read this special presentation carefully, and learn how you can uncover the 5 companies that we believe are poised to profit from this gargantuan trend ahead! Access this special "Green Industrial Revolution" presentation now More reading Here’s why this penny stock jumped almost 30% last week How to start investing in stocks 3 high-risk, high-reward penny stocks Why I would buy these FTSE 100 stocks to hold for a decade Why has the Cairn Energy share price risen sharply? John Town owns shares of BAE Systems, ITM Power, Ocado and The Renewables Infrastructure Group. John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Amazon. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Avast Plc, Ocado Group, and boohoo group and has recommended the following options: long January 2022 $1,920 calls on Amazon and short January 2022 $1,940 calls on Amazon. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  47. London Markets: High-tech Kroger partner and ‘stay-at-home’ favorite Ocado says food shopping is changed forever (09/02/2021 - Market Watch)
    High-tech grocer Ocado reported a 33% surge in profits through 2020, as the group laid out its belief that the grocery landscape has been forever changed by the COVID-19 pandemic.
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  48. The Sainsbury’s share price is rising. Should I buy the stock today? (19/07/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Sainsbury’s (LSE: SBRY) shares are having a good run at the moment. Since it came to light on 19 June that rival Morrisons had attracted takeover interest, the company’s share price has jumped almost 10%. Meanwhile, over 12 months, the stock is up about 45%. Is this a stock I should buy for my portfolio? Let’s take a look at the investment case. 3 things to like about Sainsbury’s shares There are a number of things I like about Sainsbury’s from an investment point of view. For starters, I like the company’s ‘defensive’ characteristics. Supermarkets tend to hold up well throughout the economic cycle, simply because people always need to buy food and essential items. While I’m more of a growth investor, I think it’s important to own some defensive stocks for balance. Second, I like the dividend yield here. This financial year (ending 6 March 2022), analysts expect Sainsbury’s to reward shareholders with a dividend payout of 11.2p per share. At the current share price, that equates to a prospective yield of 3.9%. In today’s low-interest-rate environment, that’s an attractive yield. Remember, dividends aren’t guaranteed. Third, the stock’s valuation still seems reasonable, even after the recent share price rise. Analysts expect the group to generate earnings of 21.4p per share this financial year. At the current share price, that equates to a forward-looking price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of 13.3. That’s below the median forward-looking FTSE 100 P/E of 15.8. 3 concerns  I do have some concerns about Sainsbury’s shares however. One is in relation to short interest. Right now, SBRY is the most shorted stock in the UK, according to shorttracker.co.uk, with short interest of 8.2%. This means that plenty of institutions are betting the stock will fall. It’s worth noting that this month, the number of SBRY shares on loan has risen quite substantially and a number of short sellers have declared new positions over 0.5%. This suggests to me the short sellers believe the recent share price rise here is unjustified. Another concern for me is that, in recent years, Sainsbury’s hasn’t been a very profitable business. Over the last five years, its average return on capital employed (ROCE) has been just 3.7%. That’s very poor. Companies that generate a low ROCE often turn out to be poor long-term investments. Finally, I don’t think Sainsbury’s has a genuine competitive advantage. There’s really nothing to stop competitors such as Tesco, Waitrose, Aldi, Lidl, and Ocado stealing market share. Ultimately, it needs to cut prices to be competitive and retain market share and that’s not a good long-term strategy, in my view. Sainsbury’s shares: should I buy? Weighing everything up, I don’t see SBRY as a ‘buy’ for me right now. To my mind, the risks here outweigh the potential rewards on offer. All things considered, I think there are much better stocks I could buy today. The post The Sainsbury’s share price is rising. Should I buy the stock today? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Like this one… FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading 2 UK shares to buy for a summer of sports Morrisons share price surge: should I buy Sainsburys now? After the Sainsbury’s share price soars 21%, would I still buy SBRY? Are Sainsbury shares now a screaming buy? 3 top UK dividend stocks to buy now Edward Sheldon has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Morrisons, Ocado Group, and Tesco. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  49. BPCL share price hits fresh 52-week high on net profit in Q4; firm declares final dividend (27/05/2021 - Financial Express)
    Bharat Petroleum Corporation Ltd (BPCL) share price surged to a fresh 52-week high of Rs 488 apiece on BSE, rising 3.5 per cent intraday.
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