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19 September 2021
13:32 hour

Money Market Accounts – Are They For You?

Wallstreet Survivor

01/09/2021 - 16:40

Money Market Accounts Money market accounts are a special type of savings account that come with their own advantages and restrictions. Today, we’ll be talking about how these accounts work and if they’re the right choice for you. What Is a Money Market Account? A money market account is essentially an interest-bearing bank account that ... Read more The post Money Market Accounts – Are They For You? appeared first on Wall Street Survivor.


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  1. The Moneyist: My husband of 30 years has been hiding income in secret bank accounts — with his mother’s help (26/05/2021 - Market Watch)
    ‘I want to protect the last of my inheritance and two money-market accounts currently in my name.’
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  2. The Moneyist: My boyfriend moved in to increase his credit score. Now he wants to buy a home together — without saving any money (07/06/2021 - Market Watch)
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  3. What will happen to stocks if we do see hyperinflation? (28/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I’m pretty terrified of how much money was recently pumped into our economy. The M2 Money Supply vs Inflation chart seems to indicate that inflation catches up to the money supply about 18 months after money is introduced. The US money supply chart is parabolic. If a loaf of white bread costs $30, what will a share of, for example, SPY cost? It makes sense for a ton of excess money in circulation to cause stocks to similarly be inflated, no? Or will people be forced to liquidate their accounts to afford food? Do you think we will first see stocks abruptly shoot up to multiple times what they currently are? Or is the money supply already nearly fully priced in? Or are we more likely to first encounter some sort of disaster that pops this bull market?   submitted by   /u/not_a_doctor93 [link]   [comments]
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  4. Advice for a young investor (11/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    My awesome son has said he wants me to open a brokerage account for him- Fidelity has them for teens whose parents have accounts. He sees me investing- I’ve been in the stock market with IRAs and mutual funds for years as well as some bluechip companies. This year I bought AMC and GME as well. But this year has really shined a light on so much corruption and market manipulation, that I don’t know how to explain it to my son and make him think that investing is a positive thing! Like if I didn’t already have the money in the market I don’t know if I would feel good about investment more. So I should I explain this to him? And with the S&P SO HIGH right now, would it be better to wait for a correction before putting his allowance and lawn mowing money in the market? WWYD? Thanks!   submitted by   /u/NotRichorFamous [link]   [comments]
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  5. Where Do You Store Your Money? (06/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  6. Easy Money but at What Cost? (21/08/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  7. What do you guys think about my strategy? (03/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  8. Found this really helpful stuff specifically if you are new to Stock market or just want to gain more experience in trading and investing. (17/08/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  9. Easy Money but how to Reduce Leverage? (21/08/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Basically, the Market is stingy and OP wants easy money, but over leveraging is too much and margin is inherently risky. So with only a small $5K account and margin privilege, it was too easy to take on $27K positions, using $4,834 margin Buying Power, picking up the full $38 premiums (net gain of $37.79). A $37.79 win / $4834 x100 = 0.78% per week --> x4 weeks = 3.12% monthly gain, which looks nice but a few years ago HYS accounts were paying close to that. Taking on 5x leverage for market crumbs is not appetizing. Basically, how to win (easy money) without using so much leverage? All expired worthless today   submitted by   /u/TS_Potenza [link]   [comments]
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  10. How do you distribute your stocks between your taxable and non-taxable accounts? (18/08/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    For the longest time, I put most of my stocks into total market ETFs, then over a year ago, I decided to pick my own stocks. It was picking a mix of tech/growth/foreign, etc. I did decently against the S&P, but I kinda want to go back to a mix of individual stocks and total market. My question is how does everyone here distribute stocks between your taxable and non-taxable accounts? More aggressive stocks in your taxable accounts? or vice versa? My Fidelity is currently about 50% taxable, 25% traditional IRA, 25% Roth IRA (got super lucky with a few stock picks hence the high percentage).   submitted by   /u/Changsta [link]   [comments]
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  11. Looking to invest in US stock market? Know the process, costs, watchouts before you invest (11/03/2021 - Financial Express)
    While there were 4.9 million demat accounts opened in India in 2020, India accounts for less than 3% of global stock market value.
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  12. : Inherited $500K? Or $1 million? Here’s how to make that money act like a monthly pension (30/03/2021 - Market Watch)
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  13. : Inherited $500K? Or $1 million? Here’s how to make that money act like a monthly pension (30/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    With the right asset allocation and withdrawal strategy, investors may not worry so much about the large sum of money in their accounts.
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  14. Is there any benefit to having 2 accounts with the same strategy ? (27/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
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  15. What’s your opinion on social media accounts manipulating the ‘meme’ stocks? (29/06/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  16. General Advice for my significant other. Hoping I can get some opinions. (24/08/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I have been a poster/lurker on this forum for around a year and a half. I have gained a lot of valuable knowledge and insight from reading posts and asking questions, so I figured I would give this a shot. I am posting this for my significant other since she doesn't have Reddit. I am going to post her question verbatim but can respond to any further details needed. Anything in parentheses is my thoughts: I'm 34, live in Massachusetts, and am approximately 31 years away from retirement. I make $106k per year before benefits and taxes. I currently have two 401(k) accounts through former employers that I'm thinking of consolidating, and I'm wondering how to maximize the long-term growth of my money. The oldest account is with Fidelity and contains approx. $25k. Throughout the year, I am docked various amounts due to items called "Employee Deferral" and "Non-Safe Harbor Match." I can't figure out what these are or how the amounts are calculated. (I tried to figure this out myself but this is costing her a good deal of her gains, not to mention that the account has severely underperformed the market indices the last year. They are $11-25 debits every two to three weeks. I looked up safe harbor but I cannot figure out what it is in relation to her situation). The next account is with ADP and contains approx. $72k. My former employer has alerted me that I need to move this money out of the account by October 10th or they'll put it into a money market account (that's been under-performing for ten years) for me. Based on my research, I know that I can roll my two 401(k) accounts into a Traditional or a Roth IRA. Living in MA, there's a possibility that I'll retire in NH. Since NH doesn't have an income tax, I'm wondering how my withdrawals would be affected for each IRA type. Specifically, with a traditional IRA, I'd typically pay taxes in retirement when I withdraw the money, but because NH doesn't tax income, does that mean I'd avoid taxes altogether? (I was recommending a Roth IRA but if this is true about NH I can't see how that wouldn't be a huge advantage.) I also learned through my research that I can only contribute up to $6k per year into an IRA. Because my two 401(k) accounts are way over that threshold, would I incur penalties? Or are rollovers exempt from that stipulation? Also, are there other 401(k) rollover options besides the traditional and the Roth IRA that I should consider? (I was recommending to her to roll one of the accounts into a Roth IRA with Fidelity and to throw the money into some of their mutual funds - nothing over a 0.6 expense ratio and maybe roll the other into a regular investment account and buy some safe individual stocks and ETFs).   submitted by   /u/Starbuckwhatdoyahear [link]   [comments]
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  17. Question about stocks and the money supply (06/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Is the growth of the US stock market more or less dependent on a growing money supply in the US? It has to be like that right? Because if the money supply isnt growing then we will reach a cap of how much money can be added to the stock market. Now i know that money from other countries is flowing into the US stock market but that cant be the driving factor for the stock market growth, right? Second question is if there is a guarantee that the money supply will Continue to grow in the long term future? And if it wont, what would happen to the stock market? But if it will continue to grow in the long term, could one say that we have more or less secured future growth in the stock market also? Happy for answers :)   submitted by   /u/Lillgagge194 [link]   [comments]
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  18. How you should start with investing (06/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I've seen a ton of posts recently from new investors asking how they should get started in investing along with a lot of posts from people who have just gotten into the stock market, lost a lot of money and are now panicking. As such I figured I'd just make a quick post to recommend what I feel is the best way to get started in the stock market. Step 1: Take 90% of your capital that you would like to invest and put it in a total market index fund like VTI or FZROX You're new at this, no matter how much research you have done you don't know what you're doing and will make mistakes. Putting your money into an index fund will give you good returns along with the security of knowing with 99.999% certainty that if there is a dip it WILL recover (and if it doesn't you probably have bigger problems to worry about). It will also help you get used to the ups and downs of the market without getting emotional. Step 2: Start paper trading Most brokerages offer a "paper trading" account. These are accounts where you invest with fake money and can track how you would have done with these investments. I know you're excited and want to start investing now so you can make money, but you're new and will likely fall into one of several common pitfalls of new investors, better to do this with fake money than real money. And besides if you follow step 1 your money is invested and you are getting good returns. Step 3*: Start using your 10% cash to make real stock purchases Once you do well after a few months to a year of paper trading (it seems like a long time I know but trust me the stock market will still be there when you're done), take some of your remaining capital and start buying stocks. Real investing is not like paper trading when it comes to your actual money, keep that in mind. You will find yourself panicking for the first time here, that's fine, remember the vast majority of your money is in a solid investment with little risk and good returns. Step 4*: Start moving more into stock picks After a few years of doing well with your 10%, if you feel like you'd rather pick your own stocks over using an index fund then start moving money out of your total market index funds into individual stock picks And that's it, that's (in my opinion) the best way to get started in the stock market. *These steps aren't actually necessary, you can just leave 100% of your capital in total market index funds and you will be fine, in fact that's what I would recommend you do but I realize that many people, especially those that come to this subreddit, would rather take their chances and try to outperform the market   submitted by   /u/flobbley [link]   [comments]
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  19. Quotes On Investing, Personal Finance, and Life. (17/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Words of wisdom that still hold true. ONLY WHEN THE TIDE GOES OUT DO YOU DISCOVER WHO’S BEEN SWIMMING NAKED. WE HAVE LONG FELT THAT THE ONLY VALUE OF STOCK FORECASTERS IS TO MAKE FORTUNE-TELLERS LOOK GOOD. THE MOST IMPORTANT QUALITY FOR AN INVESTOR IS TEMPERAMENT, NOT INTELLECT. YOU NEED A TEMPERAMENT THAT NEITHER DERIVES GREAT PLEASURE FROM BEING WITH THE CROWD OR AGAINST THE CROWD. Rising Tide Lift All Boats. It's not whether you're right or wrong that's important, but how much money you make when you're right and how much you lose when you're wrong. The stock market is filled with individuals who know the price of everything, but the value of nothing. How many millionaires do you know who have become wealthy by investing in savings accounts? If you have trouble imagining a 20% loss in the stock market, you shouldn’t be in stocks. Wide diversification is only required when investors do not understand what they are doing. The stock market is a device to transfer money from the impatient to the patience.   submitted by   /u/Guy_PCS [link]   [comments]
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  20. Dividing large sum to meet safety net? (12/09/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I’m not really sure how to word this question but, If SIPC insures only around $500,000 in brokerage accounts, how do you safely invest large sums of money? Is this 250-500k for each account meaning you create a bunch of accounts and spread the total sum? Or do you just keep the 500k+ sum in one account and hope your brokerage is big enough to not go tits up?   submitted by   /u/MuzGotTheBooze [link]   [comments]
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  21. Investing questions (30/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I'm 21 years old and I've recently acquired a large sum of money around $30,000. I don't need this money at the moment and I really just want to put my money somewhere and let it grow. I saw some other post saying to put money in SPY, VTI, QQQ and etc. I'm interested in putting my money in these stocks but I'm also worried. I've heard a lot about a looming stock market crash and how bad it's looking. I have little to no knowledge or experience with the stock market and was wondering if it's safe to invest in those stocks now? Also I'm using robinhood. Is robinhood safe to keep my money in for years or would you recommend something else? Thanks in advance to anyone who responds with some advice!   submitted by   /u/shmeboi11 [link]   [comments]
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  22. Teen with money just sitting in a savings account (28/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I’m 16 and have a part time job, all of the money from which I don’t plan on touching until college or afterwards. However, this money is currently just sitting in a savings account and I feel like I could be investing it to have it grow. I have a few hundred (gift from parents) invested in the stock market but a relative from a finance background suggests to sell it for now when possible and not put any more money into the market until after the crash they’re all waiting for. I just feel like it’s such a waste to do absolutely nothing with this money. Should I just wait for this crash and if/when it does happen, then what? Should I swing trade or just buy and take dividends? Should I go into ETFs or cr*pto (my post got removed for that word lol) or stick with the stocks I’m currently in (tech and green energy)? And how much money should I invest if I do? I don’t want to put all my money in the market of course. Should I start a retirement fund already? Or am I just being too impatient and should just wait and worry about this later?   submitted by   /u/sadwatermeloon [link]   [comments]
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  23. Do you guys recommend having multiple brokerage/retirement accounts across various brokerage platforms to keep all of my money SIPC-insured? (09/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Of course, as of right now, I don’t have $1M to want to split between different platforms, but I wanted to know if this would be a good idea, in the hypothetical event where I’d have enough money to want to spread out.   submitted by   /u/areintelligent [link]   [comments]
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  24. What is your time horizon when investing? (08/08/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Hear me out. Generally speaking you start to invest when you are aroun 27-30, as before you have uni, not much money, loans to pay off etc. Now, we ALL invest to, at some point, be whealtier. Now, I think we can agree that the ultimate goal is to retire early or to retire normally with a good amount that can provide financial stability. So the maximum time horizon you should always look for is 30 years. No more. It doesnt matter what are the results of 40-50-60 years in the market You are all gonna die or be too old to enjoy any of that money. It doesnt really matter being rich when you are 70. You are too old to travel, do experiences, enjoying life. Provided you get there (and I'm sorry to say that 3 out of 10 will die earlier), it doesnt really matter. Money invested in the markets has to be used and available at some point in your life. There is no point of die with money in your accounts. (dont bring up the kids inheritance bullshit cause means you are truly uneducated and stupid). So, Whenever you look at compound or time horizon, 30 years max. No more. Even if you are 18. 30 years at 10% and your money does x16. This means 100.000 will be 1.6M. Dont look further. 30 years max. Dont be fooled by wall street idiocity ''if you bought S&p in the 60s..'' the answer is ALWAYS '' I would be dead by now ''.   submitted by   /u/emilstyle91 [link]   [comments]
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  25. Need help deactivating our Robinhood accounts. (24/02/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    So me and my fiancée got a link from a friend saying this app gives out free money so we were dumb enough to create accounts. Once I saw it was stocks I immediately didn’t want any part of it neither did she. We have been trying to deactivate for weeks snd have had no luck. I don’t trust my bank account being out on this and I don’t want anything to come back against me or her. That being said we sold all of our shares I signed up for the cash management cause I didn’t see an option to withdraw cash to bring account balance to zero but yet it stays $0.00 all the time. Is anyone able to give some guidance here. Robinhood support is a joke and won’t ever get a response from them. We have got scammed into getting one and i have watched videos and still makes no sense. We sold all of our shares but yet it still won't let us withdrawal to our bank accounts to bring the balance down to zero. Please help. I applied for the cash app not knowing what that is does anyone know will that affect anything?   submitted by   /u/DKemper20 [link]   [comments]
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  26. Is now a bad time to start putting money in the market? (14/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I’m a new investor. I have like $300 in the market. Now with so much uncertainty and the stocks I want to invest in being so highly priced (appl, fb, etc.), I feel like it’s a terrible time to put in my money. I’m rlly bummed I didn’t know anything in 2020 and didn’t put any money in the market, but now I want to start building a portfolio, and it seems like it’s now become the worse time to invest. I was thinking about doing some recurring investments and throwing in like $50 a month. I’m trying to understand the market and how the US’s COVID recovery might affect the market but I rlly don’t have a good grasp on this stuff. It seems like most ppl r saying it’s a bad time to invest and there’s this bubble and stocks are all over valued rn and yadayadayada, but then at the same time isn’t the market going to go up along with consumer spending when more vaccines roll out? Wouldnt it be smart to start investing before we rlly ramp up our COVID recovery? I’m lost. Ik u can’t actually predict the market, but I don’t want to throw all my money in now and he royally fucked later.   submitted by   /u/TerryisScarry [link]   [comments]
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  27. The market is bound to bounce back. (22/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Don't sell off any of your stocks and like everyone is saying if you can afford to, buy the dips! The next green day (for you new guys like me supposedly that means on days we actually get to see profits or so the stories claim) you'll be glad you loaded up on more stocks. If you're scared and sell you'll be sorry you did and you'll but high again and the next red day you see you'll sell low again at will stay in a cycle losing money. Remember! "The stock market is a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient"? -Buffet "Time in the market beats timing the market" "Scared money doesn't make money" "Buy low sell high" "You haven't lost anything if you don't sell" "HODL" Find a new hobby and stop looking at your portfolio's unless you need to sell to buy something else or because your need money. If you're not gonna buy or sell why even look at it? Go for a run, walk, build a model car, binge watch a new show, get a side hustle so you have more money to buy more stocks. Wish you all the best.   submitted by   /u/ragstorichespodcast [link]   [comments]
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  28. Dont accept requests to invest other peoples money (24/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I started messing around on the stock market early last year and made a small amount of money, my family wanted in on the action and my mothers fiance wanted to invest £1000. I protested since I'm not an experienced trader and could loose it all... my mother kept asking me for weeks to do it for him and i eventually caved and took his money.. well what do you know, I lost it all like an idiot. And now he is asking for it back after it is all gone and I litterally don't have the funds to give it back. Please learn from my mistake, many people assume that if they invest money with someone making/made money on the stock market that they will too and that their money is somehow safe when its really not.   submitted by   /u/cluckcucked [link]   [comments]
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  29. Twitter sets record straight on suspended, withheld accounts over farmers’ protest, Govt calls it unusual: story in 10 points (10/02/2021 - Financial Express)
    Twitter has permanently suspended more than 500 accounts for violating its rules and withheld “a portion” of accounts flagged by MeitY.
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  30. Where does the money go? (14/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    We may or may not be entering a Bear Market soon and it got me thinking. Money supply is a nearly closed system. The leaks in the system are printing money, synthetic instrument creation, and destruction of capital/cash, but generally speaking and in the short-term it is a closed system. So where does the money go when the market turns bearish? Is there any empirical evidence beyond "Scared money buys gold." I keep seeing red swing days followed by big gains and I'm wondering how much of it is the simple fact that the money has no where to go but under a mattress and people don't feel comfortable with that plan because of inflation. Another way to think of it is, if everything is a bubble then nothing is a bubble. Like Mr. Burns having the exact right amount of diseases offsetting each other.   submitted by   /u/konsf_ksd [link]   [comments]
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  31. Real Question: Why does the stock market keep going up year over year (Read before judging) (22/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    I've been in the market for a while now, but taking a step back and looking at it way more broadly, it confuses me how the market rises consistently, year over year, where is all the money coming from? inflation is raising slower than money is going in, so is there just more money being pumped into the economy without inflation occurring at the same amount? if the US population is to stop growing will the stock market stop consistent growth too? That last question is kind of the conclusion i've reached but have no idea if its right or not, and I feel stupid asking that, but it literally doesn't make sense where all the money is coming from, for over 100 years, consistent growth... how?   submitted by   /u/The_Will_Here [link]   [comments]
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  32. Flow of money (16/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Let’s try this again. First submission was blocked. I’m wondering what everyone here thinks about the possible flow of money from the stock market into other places, like real estate and virtual currencies. Money goes where the return is and those other two asset classes are on fire again. Will the money move?   submitted by   /u/themanclark [link]   [comments]
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  33. Your Money: Now, those aged 65-70 years can sign up for NPS (30/08/2021 - Financial Express)
    Those subscribers who have closed their NPS accounts can open a new account as per increased age eligibility norms.
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  34. Does anyone else feel "played" when the market moves so quickly and then trades sideways for a long time after? (04/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I realize it is completely legal and there is nothing anyone can do about it but you can "feel/see" when the big players are moving money around. They drive the market down really quickly and then sit until all the "small players" throw their money in. The 2 to 3 percent moves over 20 minutes followed by .1 percent moves every 20 minutes following. I don't think it's really all these "paper hands" selling as much as big money pushing the market around so they can make money. When things trade sideways they don't make money. If you could move the market you would want to push prices down (short sell) along with some small "bad news" event to spark fear. Wait for the buyers to scoop up shares until things recover 25 percent and then drive the price back down again. At the end of the day a lot of people are on edge so there is more money to be made pushing the market lower then there is pushing it higher. At least in the next couple of week. I just recognize how insignificant retail investors are to the market yet how important they are to hedge funds and the like.   submitted by   /u/GMEgotmehere [link]   [comments]
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  35. Retirement Weekly: Americans are leaving old 401(k) accounts behind — and paying the price (23/07/2021 - Market Watch)
    There are over 24 million forgotten 401(k) accounts
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  36. Method how we can earn money on the stock market every day several times (10/03/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    In the first 30 minutes, let's buy again in the last 30 minutes of every hour to sell That way we can make money every hour. That way we'll be able to make money several times a day For example, when the stock market opens at 9.30 NY, we buy until 10 NY, after which until 10.30 NY we sell And so we'll do the hour by the hour Post this on all social media recipes and all groups on reddit That way we won't lose any more money and we'll earn money We're not going to gamble anymore. I know a lot of people won't agree to this method but they have to understand as big companies on the stock exchange and they've made a plan and understanding between them so we can make money and we little ones can lose So we'll make a plan so we can earn money   submitted by   /u/MihaiiB [link]   [comments]
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  37. rigged. Nasdaq turns on a dime today at 12.5% decline from all time highs. like September 2020. How to think like big money? (05/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Is this a fake out? Is big money buying back in now that everything looks cheap? The pullback from last september was 14% from all time highs. The one in october was 10.3% Does anyone remember the reasons for those pullbacks? Of course they say don't try to time the market, but surely there must be indicators and gossip that the market is about to take a turn. big money pulls the rug, taking profits, and jumps back in just in time to buy everything that is oversold. Wouldn't you like to do the same? how can we think more like big money?   submitted by   /u/pman6 [link]   [comments]
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  38. Any other books like Market Wizards or Money Masters? (14/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I’ve read all the Money Masters books, where the author interviews famous fund managers (Peter Lynch, Warren Buffet, etc.). The Money Masters and New Money Masters are fantastic books by the way if you haven’t read them. Each fund manager explains their style and experience trading stocks with a lot of insight provided. I am now reading all the Market Wizard books, and they are equally engrossing. Are there any other books or resources online that are like this, where they interview money managers and get their opinions on investing/trading? Hearing about other people’s experiences and successes is one of my favorite parts of being involved in the stock market, and I think that’s why I enjoy this sub so much. The amount of knowledge out there is incredible and we are all very lucky to have these subs.   submitted by   /u/Zach9559 [link]   [comments]
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  39. My Gratitude to Stock Market (08/08/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    I have never been the type to spend money. I go cheap on dates. I don’t drink. I don’t shop. I don’t eat out. I don’t party. I hardly spend money. If there’s one thing to be thankful for from the stock market experience, is it has elevated my spending habits. Given the amount of money I have lost with Options trading, I don’t even flinch anymore when it comes to spending money. Now I fly mostly business or first class, I buy things without second thoughts, I eat out more often than not, and I spend on just about anything that peaks my interest. What do I have to loose.. After all, I have lost more simply at the click of a mouse.   submitted by   /u/NapLvr [link]   [comments]
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  40. Beginner investing for long term (04/08/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Hi, I'm 19 and I want to start investing for the long term. I have some questions for anyone who's willing to answer and give advice... What stock broker should I register in and invest in? TD or interactive brokers or any other one? (I want to be able to invest the money I have even if I can't afford a whole share for example let's say Tesla is 700 per share but I only want/have 200 to invest in it) Should I put money into a TFSA account and invest from it? Also, should I make two TFSA accounts? One Canadian and the other US for US stocks? since I live in Canada. I don't have much to invest now. However, each month I will be adding more money and investing more hopefully. How should I diversify my money into diff stocks? Should I invest 60-70% in S&P 500, 20-30% into GAMA, and the rest into riskier plays? Any advice is highly appreciated and thanks in advance   submitted by   /u/reddit062802 [link]   [comments]
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  41. Can someone explain to me holding cash vs. continuously putting money in the market (no cash holding)? (20/08/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Looking for some clarification, correction, or reassurance. My hunch is that option 1 is trying to time the market while option 2 is time in the market. I always thought time in the market is better. With exceptions like HUGE covid dips that happen once a decade, where holding cash can be extremely profitable, wouldn't it be wiser to just put money in the market continuously and not holding cash? Smaller market corrections only set the market back a few weeks or months at most. Waiting for non-covid-or-recession-style-dips may present you an opportunity where you make 10% in a week, but had you put money in the months prior you would be netting those returns anyway. I am looking for someone to correct me, or maybe I am on to something? I hold 0% cash and I simply invest more from my paycheck every 2 weeks.   submitted by   /u/HoldMyNaan [link]   [comments]
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  42. I have $800 that I can afford to play around with. What should I put it in? (15/09/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    This is by no means a lot of money compared to a lot of fuck-off money that people have but I am young and I have saved up enough and am in a good financial position to where I have some money that I can put into the stock market. What should I put it into?   submitted by   /u/BlackExcellence19 [link]   [comments]
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  43. Make your money earn more! Here’s how to get more on savings account balance (08/07/2021 - Financial Express)
    Every bank structures the auto-sweep accounts differently and has different terms and conditions associated with such products.
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  44. Leverage in the stock market? (18/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    So in real estate, if you want to buy a property you don't need to pay for 100% of the property with your own money. You can do a 10% down payment using your own money. The rest of the 90% you pay for by borrowing money from the bank via a loan. Is there a similar concept, service, finance vehicle in the stock market? Say if I have $100k in my account, is there a service that I must apply for to borrow $100k? Thanks.   submitted by   /u/b10m1m1cry [link]   [comments]
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  45. If there is a market crash, does CORE POSITION matter? (08/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    The Core Position I am referring to is how CASH is held in your brokerage. I use Fidelity, and two years ago I moved my Cash/core position from the Fidelity Cash FDIC insured into the Fidelity Money Market fund because it paid better monthly interest on my cash positions. Since the Fed rate dropped to near zero percent last year March, these monthly interest payments seem nominal. I am thinking about moving my Cash position back to FDIC insured. Has anyone gone through 1999 or 2008 with their cash in the Money Market Fund? Did you ever lose money in the money market fund?   submitted by   /u/Tankre84 [link]   [comments]
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  46. Big amount of accounts payable (14/08/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Hello there! First post around here. I just would like to get your thoughts on a company I've been analysing, and now I've got a devil on one shoulder and an angel on the other. The company has good fundamentals, but something that has jumped to my attention was the fact that it has more liabilities than assets. When looking more in-depth, the vast majority of liabilities are accounts payable. Well, from my point of view this is actually a good practice as they're generating revenue with no money upfront, basically. But (and there's always a but) what happens when/if demand takes a turn? Yes, they can negotiate to extend the paying period but basically they still have those payables, without having the revenue/profit. I'd like to hear your thoughts on this. What do you think?   submitted by   /u/yeetdafleet [link]   [comments]
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  47. Diversification question for smaller accounts (24/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Hey guys. I'm relatively new to investing in the stock market (few months in) and have a question about diversification. For smaller accounts, is there a point where diversification isn't as worth it? For example, I am going to be getting about a 1k tax return soon. I'm not asking for advice on the stocks specifically, so I won't list names, but let's say there's 4 stocks that I believe will do pretty well. Would be be worth it to put 250$ in all 4, even though it might only be 1 or 2 shares of each? Or since its a relatively small amount, would it be better to just put 500$ in 2? Thanks for any advice!   submitted by   /u/mumph124 [link]   [comments]
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  48. Is the stock market zero-sum game? (06/09/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Someone says it is positive-sum because indexes rise, but this does not make sense to me. I googled some and the most plausible answer is that dividends would be the only return as whole. I always have been curious about where does the money come from if the stock market can compensate every participant theoretically. Please point out any error on my understanding of how the stock market seems like positive-sum; Let's assume SHARE as always-increasing share (it represents the whole stock market going up in the long term). A buys one SHARE for $100. A sells it to B for $200. B sells it to C for $300. A, B, and a company(SHARE) made money total of $300. At this point, it is exactly zero-sum because C spent $300. The lost of C has to be transferred to someone who pays $300 or more. Now A,B, and C made money but the last one is holding all potential loss. However, this flow never stops because of continuous entrance of new participants (or money outside of the stock market). Cash that is pulled from outside of the stock market is the only reason of its long-term increase (here cash could have been used to purchase real estate, or just spend. From this perspective, I would like to know if it is possible to say the stock market's thriving is kind of a tradeoff that absorbs cash flow from other markets). The mechanism functions based on investors' expectations. I know little about investment and how the market works, so please educate me.   submitted by   /u/dojue [link]   [comments]
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  49. E*TRADE JUST CLOSED MY ACCOUNT OUT OF NOWHERE (21/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I was going to place some trades today for when the market opens, and I noticed something wasn't right when I wasn't able to transfer funds from my checking account within ETRADE to my brokerage account. I called up to see what was going on, and I was just informed that they're closing my accounts for an unknown reason. They gave me the bullshit risk management reason and wouldn't tell me why. I'm devastated. I have call options expiring this Friday. I've mailed checks out with the checking account. I was just buying tech stocks / options. I wasn't shorting anything or had a margin call or anything that would indicate I'm a really risky investor. The only thing I can think of is that my unemployment money comes into my checking acct with ETRADE, and I've been using it to invest. Yes, I know people can see this as irresponsible, but I live at home, and it's my money at the end of the day. I should be able to invest it how I see fit.   submitted by   /u/Polishing_My_Grapple [link]   [comments]
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