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28 July 2021
17:49 hour

Margin Requirement Question - I need information!

Reddit Stocks

22/07/2021 - 04:03

IIROC (I'm Canadian!) requires 30% margin for most TSX listed stocks. When volatility increases, brokerages sometimes will increase that requirement, sometimes to 50% or 100% (no margin allowed). This would drastically alter your margin of safety during the worst possible times. During March/April 2020 Pandemic Shock, GFC Crash 2008 and Tech Crisis+Sept 11th Crash 2001/2002 how much were margin requirements increased on the stocks you held. Please, not interested in the merits/non-merits of margin etc (so please don't comment on that). Just want to know from those who were around during those times, as I'm trying to understand the real world buffer of safety. The data I've found is very poor. Thanks for your help in advance.   submitted by   /u/agnchls [link]   [comments]


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  35. Question on PFOF and Stop Orders (19/07/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    If my broker uses Payment for Order Flow (PFOF), does that include sending info on my *pending* stop market or stop limit orders (i.e., BEFORE they are triggered, as soon as I place them) -- or would that information only be sent AFTER the pending order was triggered? Another way of asking: if my broker uses PFOF, does that mean they are selling information on exactly where my pending stop orders (limit or market) are placed? I have tried googling and researching all over, and have yet to find a clear answer to this question. Any help would be appreciated.   submitted by   /u/socraticego [link]   [comments]
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  36. Delhi Government exaggerated actual Oxygen requirement by four times: Supreme Court panel (25/06/2021 - Financial Express)
    The Supreme Court had set up a 12-member task force to audit the oxygen requirement of Delhi.
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  37. How bad do we realistically expect this dip to continue? (12/05/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I have a lot of tech stocks (please no lectures on diversify. I know. But I can't diversify when my holdings are thousands in the hole). Anyway, my biggest holding (dkng) has gone down virtually 10 straight trading days. 1 of those were green but by 13 cents so not much of a gain there. The problem is, I've been using margin to average down because I honestly did not expect it to get this low. I'm now pushing margin limits and need some expert advice. What to cut. My biggest bag holders in order are... DKNG (-23% down, $54.89 CPS) PLTR (-19% down, $23.11 CPS) SFT (-15% down, $9.16 CPS) PINS (-13% down, $65.95 CPS) DKNG is 55% holding, PINS is 22%, PLTR 8%, SFT 5% Needless to say, DKNG is the problem. I'm holding a lot and it's down the most. I used to believe in the stock, but now I don't know what do believe. So my question is... Do I just cut the cord and drop dkng before it drops to $20-25. Do I cut PINS? I can get rid of PLTR AND SFT but that won't help my margin deficit much. Or do I continue what I've been doing and shaving 10 shares at a time off either dkng or pins when margin gets close to max and just hope this crash stops soon? Serious suggestions please. No lectures. I know my mistakes. I just need to figure out the best way to mitigate my losses. Note - I don't need this money right now. I have another non-margin account that I never look at because I have all the time in the world for the stocks to rebound. But I'm racing against margin on this one so I'm wondering the best way to handle it. Thanks   submitted by   /u/stevebeans [link]   [comments]
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  38. Need help with a possible margin issue (20/03/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Trying to grasp margin. Underlying stock doesn’t match portfolio Hey, I know I might sound stupid, but I’m trying to understand something. I used margin last week for a few plays and closed out my margin yesterday. Now the underlying value of my options and stocks doesn’t match up with my portfolio value, even though I’ve paid off the margin. I understand that margin can incur additional risks and losses outside of the normal possibilities. I just am trying to wrap my head around how my underlying is not equaling to my portfolio when no margin is in use. Is this a normal risk of using margin or is there something more at play here that I am missing? I appreciate any light that someone would be willing to shed on this issue for me as it’s bothering me ever so slightly.   submitted by   /u/EnigmaticRiddler [link]   [comments]
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  39. FireEye analysts question $1.2B separation that leaves high-growth, low-margin business (03/06/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  40. TD warning me of Special Margin Requirements when I'm buying with cash? (08/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Super noob question, but I'm infact a super noob. I had done my research and got my deposit from my bank cleared into my TD account. As I went to buy some of my first stocks, I quickly get a warning "Please be aware that this security has special margin requirements". I hit youtube to try to get some clarification, but it was all videos about trading on margin, which form my limited understanding is not relevant if I'm trying to buy with cash. Is this a generic warning that appears regardless of purchase type, or does this still have some effect on me buying with cash in the account? Thanks!   submitted by   /u/Parfocal_Blue [link]   [comments]
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  41. Snowflake stock dips as analysts question soft long-term margin target (11/06/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  42. Very new to this but trying to learn ways to stay ahead of (or even catch up to) the curve. (21/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Is there a site where I, and I may be being over-hopeful, can find out information on stocks that are due to hit the market for trading in the near future. Ideally a site that lists what stocks are coming to open market and when(what date). This could very well be a dumb question, and I wouldn’t know so please be gentle lol, again..I’m quite new to all this, so I can’t yet decipher an important question from a moot one. Thanks for your understanding and for any help ????????   submitted by   /u/B1unt4ce20 [link]   [comments]
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  43. Trading with a margin account but without borrowing and my OWN CASH. (11/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Hi Everyone, I've been trying to research this and find out but i recently moved to tradestation and i used to be on trading212. In the UK, there is a no settlement law for cash accounts as far as i know. There may be but trading212 didn't have this so therefore i could instantly sell and buy a stock within minutes apart and do this 20 or even 100 times a day, 5 days a week. Because i have moved to US Broker, i have to wait for a settlement date until i can use my cash again which isn't ideal for a day trader. So my question is, can i open a margin account and never ever borrow their money so that way i can avoid any interest fee's and loan fees. Would this then allow me to instantly have access to my own cash again after i sell as long as i have 25k minimum at the end of each day? so lets say i purchase a stock and bought $30k worth and then i sell my investments and now i have $35k. On the same day, on a CASH ACCOUNT i would need to wait for the $35k to settle before i can use it again (3 days). IF i have a margin account, can i do the same thing but have the $35k available instantly without having to borrow from my broker? TLDR: Can i use a margin account to day trade 100 of trades without paying any margin account fees/loans. In advance, thanks for reading and i appreciate it if you would have time to reply :)   submitted by   /u/Wsshooter [link]   [comments]
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  44. ENX price history (01/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    It's a question that has been bothering me since it happened, I tried to dig some information, but didn't find anything. Recently (I believe after the acquisition of Borsa Italiana by Euronext on 29th of April, the sites I know started showing wrong history of this stock's prices. For example, here is the current graph. https://www.tradingview.com/symbols/EURONEXT-ENX/ Take a look at points between August 2020 and March 2021: The maximum value, according to this graph, is about 97-98, then it declines and reaches about 86 at the end of February, then falls to about 73 and is currently at 88.25 (at the moment of me writing this). However, if we take a look at some past screenshots/analytics/predictions (I've seen it with my own eyes, but it is anecdotic evidence, so I'm giving some proofs), so here is a link from the 6th of February https://www.tradingview.com/chart/ENX/9d7Sy6RK-ENX-is-in-a-beautiful-uptrend-channel/ we clearly see that the graph as a whole was 10 EUR higher. And it's not just this site's problem - I've just taken this as an example, feel free to look on other platforms. My question is - what is going on? Is this deliberate or do you think it is a technical error? I find this extremely misleading, false past data may affect decisions on buying/selling stocks. I will go as far as to say that I question legitimacy of all other stocks information available.   submitted by   /u/niaphim [link]   [comments]
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  45. Standup India: PM Modi’s scheme sanctioned over 1 lakh loans in 5 years to SC/ST, women entrepreneurs (16/03/2021 - Financial Express)
    Credit and Finance for MSMEs: Pursuant to the announcement made in the Budget speech this year by Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman, the margin money requirement for loans under Standup India scheme was reduced from up to 25 per cent to up to 15 per cent.
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  46. Question on DD and how to pursue smarter investments (13/04/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Question on DD and how to pursue investments that aren’t a gamble. When you go to look at an investment into an equity do you usually pick and choose random stocks on a list then proceed to do DD on that equity and if so how do you conduct that DD to be sure it’s an investment you would be willing to pursue (what steps do you usually take for DD) I am asking for this information because lately I have felt like I’m in a casino and I don’t enjoy it. I encured my first loss as well this week and don’t want to feel so out of control on an investment again.   submitted by   /u/Stock-Possibility893 [link]   [comments]
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  47. Poland Reserve Requirement (16/02/2021 - Trading Economics)
    Cash Reserve Ratio in Poland remained unchanged at 0.50 percent in January from 0.50 percent in December of 2020. Cash Reserve Ratio in Poland averaged 3.60 percent from 1999 until 2021, reaching an all time high of 5 percent in October of 1999 and a record low of 0.50 percent in April of 2020. In Poland, reserve requirement refers to a monetary policy instrument used by the central bank, to regulate the banking sector liquidity and to mitigate volatility of short-term interest rates. The reserve requirement is an obligation imposed on banks to maintain a specific average level of funds (set as a percentage) on their accounts with the central bank. This page provides - Poland Cash Reserve Ratio- actual values, historical data, forecast, chart, statistics, economic calendar and news.
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  48. Am I misunderstanding a margin account or am I right to want to switch back to a cash account? (23/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I switched to a margin account with Ameritrade because I thought the extra buying power would be nice in those moments when it'd be worthwhile (e.g., I am very confident about a stock increasing in value). If that's how it works, I would be happy to have a margin account. However, it seems that I have to use margin for every stock purchase even when I have cash in my account? That seems like bullshit to me. The last thing I want to do is use margin to buy small positions here and there and then pay interest on those "loans" when I have the cash to make the buys sitting in my account. This happened yesterday and I just couldn't believe that I "owed" a margin loan despite wanting to use my own money. I've requested to switch back to cash account (no reply from them yet sigh...), but am I understanding this correct? Am I forced to use margin or did I overlook the way to use cash instead of margin?   submitted by   /u/JoshTheBear_ [link]   [comments]
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  49. Bonds on Margin (19/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Would it be smart to buy a bond on margin account and use the margin balance to buy stocks? Been thinking of doing this for a while but not sure on if it would work out. Specially since the market can go down randomly   submitted by   /u/SmalltraderFlorida [link]   [comments]
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