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06 August 2021
04:36 hour

This cheap UK share would likely appeal to Warren Buffett

The Motley Fool UK

21/07/2021 - 17:36

This cheap UK share with a P/E ratio of only eight, offers a margin of safety that I think would appeal to a value-based investor like Warren Buffett. The post This cheap UK share would likely appeal to Warren Buffett appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.


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  15. 3 Warren Buffett shares to buy right now (03/08/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Warren Buffett is known to many investors for his successful investment career. But there’s no secret to his success. Buffett, who runs Berkshire Hathaway, shares much of his investing advice openly. Based on the Buffett approach, here are three Warren Buffett shares – stocks held by Berkshire – I would consider as shares to buy now for my portfolio. I also share a couple of UK stocks I have selected using Warren Buffett investing principles. Long-term franchise When Buffett bought into Coca-Cola back in the 1980s, it was the largest position in Berkshire’s portfolio at that time. The company has what Buffett calls a moat. Its strong brands help protect it from competition. That matters as it allows the company to charge a premium for its drinks, something known as pricing power. Thanks to its powerful brands, the company is set to retain its competitive advantage in the future. Indeed, Buffett had said before that great brands last forever. While that may seem like a long timeframe, it is clear that great brands can produce returns for shareholders over many decades. A UK share I would consider for my own portfolio applying the Warren Buffett investing style is Diageo. Like Coca-Cola, it owns brands such as Johnnie Walker and Diageo, which help to give it a business moat. But both Coca-Cola and Diageo face common risks. For example, changing consumer habits favouring healthier drinks could damage their appeal and revenues. Warren Buffett shares in finance Given his own financial acumen, it’s understandable that Buffett has a long history of investing in financial services shares. One of the companies in which Berkshire has held a stake for many years is credit card and insurance provider American Express. Like Coca-Cola and Diageo, the company benefits from strong brand appeal. Buffett likes financial services providers. He is particularly interested in insurers, as they are able to put policyholder premiums to work. That simple but effective business model is one reason why financial services companies can often turn a strong profit. It can be a cyclical business, though. American Express trades 80% higher than a year ago, so I don’t think these Warren Buffett shares are cheap. But like Buffett, I’d be willing to buy American Express shares now and hold them for decades. A UK-listed financial services company I would consider when applying Warren Buffett investing principles is Prudential. It also has a strong brand. Its customer base of millions of insurance policyholders should help it remain profitable. Just like Berkshire company Geico did in the US, Prudential is extending into new direct sales channels in Asia to help scale its business further. Both American Express and Prudential face risks common to financial services companies, though. For example, an economic downturn could lead to a sharp fall in customer demand and profits. Insurance giant Buffett loves insurance companies. The business model is enduring, and the large sums of money involved mean that even a low-margin insurance business can be profitable. Insurance broker and risk management company Aon has attractive margins and a strong record of growth. That may explain why its shares have joined the Berkshire portfolio. I would consider adding them to my own. One risk is that the recently abandoned merger with rival Willis Towers Watson will reduce the company’s growth outlook. The post 3 Warren Buffett shares to buy right now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading 3 UK shares to buy This UK growth share hit a new high yesterday What’s going on with the Pets at Home share price? What’s next for the Games Workshop (GAW) share price? Can the Royal Mail share price keep climbing? Christopher Ruane has no position in any shares mentioned. American Express is an advertising partner of The Ascent, a Motley Fool company. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Berkshire Hathaway (B shares). The Motley Fool UK has recommended Diageo and Prudential and has recommended the following options: long January 2023 $200 calls on Berkshire Hathaway (B shares), short January 2023 $200 puts on Berkshire Hathaway (B shares), and short January 2023 $265 calls on Berkshire Hathaway (B shares). Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  21. I can buy Unilever shares at a lower price than Warren Buffett would have paid! (17/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Four years ago this month, Unilever (LSE: ULVR) rebuffed a Warren Buffett-backed bid for the company. The offer valued it at £40 a share. Subsequently, the Unilever share price went on to make an all-time high of £52 in the summer of 2019. Today, I can buy Unilever’s shares at a lower price than Buffett was willing to pay. At sub-£40, they’re also at a 24% discount to their all-time high. Here, I’ll discuss why I’d buy the shares at this level. I’ll also look at the potential risks to my investment case. Warren Buffett rebuffed Kraft Heinz, backed by its 50% owners Buffett and 3G Capital, approached Unilever with an initial £40-a-share offer price. However, Unilever had no interest in being acquired. According to the Financial Times, the Unilever team studied 3G’s modus operandi in previous takeovers, and concluded Kraft Heinz “would try to seem as friendly as possible and then increase its bid in increments until there was sufficient pressure from Unilever investors“. This suggests Buffett would have been willing to sanction an offer of even more than £40-a-share. However, Unilever’s board moved quickly to nip Kraft Heinz’s approach in the bud. It publicly stated it saw no merit in the offer and no basis for any further discussions. Buffett has an aversion to doing hostile takeovers, and he and 3G boss Jorge Lemann made the decision for Kraft Heinz to withdraw its proposal. Unilever share price better than fair One of Buffett’s famous sayings goes: “It’s far better to buy a wonderful company at a fair price than a fair company at a wonderful price”. That Kraft-Heinz’s £40-a-share approach for Unilever was an initial offer suggests to me sub-£40 a share represents a better than fair price for a wonderful company. Buffett’s readiness to acquire Unilever for £40 a share, and possibly at a higher price, is one reason I’d be happy to buy the stock at its current level. Historically cheap I can see a couple of risks in buying Unilever based on the Buffett share price. First, his valuation of the company could have been wrong — that’s to say, too high. It’s a risk. But I find it hard to believe Buffett, 3G’s Lemann, and the UK’s Nick Train (who was adding to his Unilever shareholding in 2017) were all significantly off the mark in their assessment of the intrinsic value of the business. Another risk is that they were right, but Unilever has become intrinsically less valuable in the four years since. However, I can’t find see any evidence for this. It’s more profitable and cash-generative than in 2017. Its underlying operating margin has expanded from 15.3% to 18.5% over the four years. Earnings per share have increased by 32% and free cash flow by 60%. I’d say Unilever is a more valuable business today than when Buffett placed his £40-a-share sighting shot on the company. Trading at an historically cheap 18.4 times trailing earnings, with a free cash flow yield of 6.4% and dividend yield of 3.7%, I’d be happy to buy Unilever at its current share price. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading FTSE 100 stocks: a UK share I think will exit Covid-19 in terrific shape Unilever shares: should I buy? These two cheap shares keep on falling. I’m delighted with this good news! The best shares to buy now: 2 FTSE 100 stocks I’ve been buying Why I won’t be rushing to buy Unilever shares G A Chester has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Unilever. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post I can buy Unilever shares at a lower price than Warren Buffett would have paid! appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  23. What stock market quotes do you live by? Here are mine (27/02/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    In no particular order: “Bears make money, bulls make money, but pigs get slaughtered.” – Jim Cramer “Be greedy when others are fearful and be fearful when others are greedy.” – Warren Buffett “In investing, what is comfortable is rarely profitable.” – Robert Arnott “Know what you own, and know why you own it.” – Peter Lynch “The stock market is a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” – Warren Buffett “Wide diversification is only required when investors do not understand what they are doing.” – Warren Buffett “Risk comes from not knowing what you’re doing.” – Warren Buffett “In the short run, the market is a voting machine. But in the long run, it is a weighing machine.” – Ben Graham “Individuals who cannot master their emotions are ill-suited to profit from the investment process.” – Benjamin Graham “Bears have predicted 20 out of the last 5 market crashes.” – Unknown “Everyone’s a genius in a bull market.” – Warren Buffett “Don’t invest money you can’t afford to lose.” – Unknown “The market can remain irrational longer than you can remain solvent.” – John Keynes Here are some of my own: “Don’t use the F word. Nothing is free.” – u/UncleZiggy "There is no place for emotions in the stock market. Emotional investors lose 100% of the time.” – u/UncleZiggy “Technical analysis is just fundamental analysis conspiracy theory.” – u/UncleZiggy “Don’t buy puts or short in a bullish market. Don’t buy calls in a bearish market.” – u/UncleZiggy “Only invest in what you know.” – u/UncleZiggy I don't agree with every quote I come across, and neither should you. What are some of your favorite quotes that guide your investment strategies? Also, if anyone knows who said some of the unknown quotes, please let me know!   submitted by   /u/UncleZiggy [link]   [comments]
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  24. What stock market quotes do you live by? Here are mine (27/02/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    In no particular order: “Bears make money, bulls make money, but pigs get slaughtered.” – Jim Cramer “Be greedy when others are fearful and be fearful when others are greedy.” – Warren Buffett “In investing, what is comfortable is rarely profitable.” – Robert Arnott “Know what you own, and know why you own it.” – Peter Lynch “The stock market is a device for transferring money from the impatient to the patient.” – Warren Buffett “Wide diversification is only required when investors do not understand what they are doing.” – Warren Buffett “Risk comes from not knowing what you’re doing.” – Warren Buffett “In the short run, the market is a voting machine. But in the long run, it is a weighing machine.” – Ben Graham “Individuals who cannot master their emotions are ill-suited to profit from the investment process.” – Benjamin Graham “Bears have predicted 20 out of the last 5 market crashes.” – Unknown “Everyone’s a genius in a bull market.” – Warren Buffett “Don’t invest money you can’t afford to lose.” – Unknown “The market can remain irrational longer than you can remain solvent.” – John Keynes Here are some of my own: “Don’t use the F word. Nothing is free.” – u/UncleZiggy "There is no place for emotions in the stock market. Emotional investors lose 100% of the time.” – u/UncleZiggy “Technical analysis is just fundamental analysis conspiracy theory.” – u/UncleZiggy “Don’t buy puts or short in a bullish market. Don’t buy calls in a bearish market.” – u/UncleZiggy “Only invest in what you know.” – u/UncleZiggy I don't agree with every quote I come across, and neither should you. What are some of your favorite quotes that guide your investment strategies? Also, if anyone knows who said some of the unknown quotes, please let me know!   submitted by   /u/UncleZiggy [link]   [comments]
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  28. I’d follow Warren Buffett’s example to buy top UK shares now (11/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    There’s one person I reckon was probably completely unfazed by the Covid-19 pandemic. Well, in terms of his investments, I mean. And that’s Warren Buffett. He famously urges investors to buy with a long-term horizon, urging us to “Only buy something that you’d be perfectly happy to hold if the market shut down for 10 years“. Wouldn’t it have been great if the UK stock market had closed in January 2020? Nobody would have suffered any losses as their share prices crashed — without a market, there wouldn’t be any share prices, so no crashes. Then, once the pandemic was behind us, the London Stock Exchange could open its doors again, and the FTSE 100 could carry on as usual. And it wouldn’t take 10 years. No, we’re less than a year and a half into it, and UK share prices are already looking a lot stronger. But wait. I, for one, am very glad that the markets didn’t close in a misguided attempt to protect us from short-term losses. The thing is, I haven’t suffered any losses. Sure, some of the stocks I own slumped in price. But they’ve already mostly recovered. And there’s another bit of Warren Buffett advice that I’ve used to offset the rest. Warren Buffett’s gold Here’s the quote I’m thinking of: “Opportunities come infrequently. When it rains gold, put out the bucket, not the thimble“. I’ve seen the past year and more as one long opportunity. An opportunity to buy good shares at cheap prices. That’s what I’ve been doing, and the gains I’ve already made from my new purchases are enough to cover what’s left of those existing declines. Now, I didn’t have huge amounts to invest. Just modest sums, every few months. And I put the money into the same shares I’d have bought anyway. I’m still seeing plenty of the golden opportunities that Warren Buffett speaks of. Some UK shares have recovered well, but I think they’re still some way short of a sensible long-term valuation. Some are still depressed, and some of those are genuinely struggling and, I think, to be avoided. But there are surely some very good shares still going cheap right now. My favourite lesson One more thought from Warren Buffett: “You only have to do a very few things right in your life so long as you don’t do too many things wrong“. In my view, if I’d sold off my shares after the stock market crashed, I would definitely have done something wrong. Avoiding that one mistake has probably done me a lot more good than any number of my buy decisions. That’s the one key lesson that I’m taking forward. Doing things right is good. But not doing things wrong is even better. And I’m certainly going to remember that next time there’s a stock market crash, and it’s raining gold in the form of cheap shares again. The post I’d follow Warren Buffett’s example to buy top UK shares now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50 Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic… And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains. But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times. Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down… You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm. That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away. Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! More reading Warpaint London’s share price rockets 15%! Should I buy this UK share now? I’d aim to make £1k a year from UK dividend stocks I’d buy these high-ROCE UK shares 1 UK growth stock to buy now ESG investing: here’s how I’d start Alan Oscroft has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  29. Growth vs value stock. Warren Buffett (and Munger) outline something so basic yet so important that mojority of today's retail investors don't take into consideration. This stuff should be taught at every school. Share this with your kids. (12/02/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  30. Warren Buffett is giving away billions (26/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Making billions is quite an accomplishment. Giving that money away is probably quite tough to do. But that’s exactly what billionaire investor Warren Buffett is doing. Let’s take a look at how much he’s giving away to charity and why he’s doing it. [top_pitch] Who is Warren Buffett? An original believer in value investing, Warren Buffett has made a lot of money through being a smart investor. The wealth he’s amassed has made him one of the richest people in the world. A lot of the wealth he’s created has been as a major shareholder in his investment company Berkshire Hathaway. But now, at the ripe old age of 90, Buffett has decided to give away a lot of the money that he’s built up over his lifetime. Why is Warren Buffett giving away money? In a recent statement, Buffett explained his reasons for giving away a lot of his wealth: “Over many decades I have accumulated an almost incomprehensible sum simply by doing what I love to do. I’ve made no sacrifice nor has my family. “Compound interest, a long runway, wonderful associates and our incredible country have simply worked their magic. Society has a use for my money; I don’t.” This isn’t the first time he’s given away a big chunk of money in the form of Berkshire Hathaway shares. He’s one of around 200 billionaires who signed ‘The Giving Pledge’. These billionaires stated that they would donate huge amounts of their wealth. In 2006, Buffett revealed he would give away all of his shares, which is equal to 99% of his net worth. How much is he giving away? Buffett’s donation to charities is equal to roughly £2.9 billion worth of Berkshire Hathaway shares. Back in 2006, Warren Buffett owned a total of 474,998 shares in the business. This recent donation takes him midway to his goal of giving away all of his shares, leaving him with 238,624 shares. So we can expect this philanthropy to continue as he goes through the motions of relieving himself of all his wealth and stock over the coming years. [middle_pitch] Who is he giving the money to? The donation of stock will be going towards five foundations: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation Sherwood Foundation Howard G. Buffett Foundation NoVo Foundation How can I follow in the footsteps of Warren Buffett? Giving away a lot of money is a noble act. But in order to do something like this, you first need to build the wealth to give away! One of the best ways of creating multi-generational wealth is through investing. Following Buffett’s example, you can use a share dealing account to invest in solid businesses that you think will be around for decades to come. There are plenty of different ways to invest. All investing carries risk, but some methods are riskier than others. Taking a long-term investing approach, as Buffett did, gives you a great chance of growing your portfolio so that you can be just as charitable one day. The post Warren Buffett is giving away billions appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading 2 high-yield stocks paying more than 8% to buy now How I’d invest £10k today Why I’m planning to buy Saga shares 3 great starter stocks for new investors Is Argo Blockchain (LSE:ARB) a stock I’d consider buying?
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  31. NewsWatch: Robinhood says criticism from Buffett’s right hand man on retail trading ‘overlooks cultural shift’ and is ‘disappointing and elitist’ (25/02/2021 - Market Watch)
    Robinhood Markets on Thursday fires back at criticism leveled against it on Wednesday from Charlie Munger, vice chairman of Berkshire Hathaway and Warren Buffett’s close partner.
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  32. Market Extra: Robinhood says criticism from Buffett’s right hand man on retail trading ‘overlooks cultural shift’ and is ‘disappointing and elitist’ (25/02/2021 - Market Watch)
    Robinhood Markets on Thursday fires back at criticism leveled against it on Wednesday from Charlie Munger, vice chairman of Berkshire Hathaway and Warren Buffett’s close partner.
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  33. Why I’d follow this aspect of Warren Buffett’s strategy when buying cheap UK shares (11/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Warren Buffett has a long track record of successfully outperforming the stock market. In doing so, he has become one of the wealthiest people in the world. While his strategy has focused on buying cheap shares in high-quality companies, he has also concentrated his capital in industries that he fully understands. While this has meant missing out on potentially attractive investment opportunities, it has also allowed him to avoid losing money on other investments. Following a similar strategy could be a sound move when buying cheap UK shares. It may lead to less risk and higher long-term returns. Warren Buffett’s sphere of knowledge Warren Buffett has typically invested in a relatively narrow range of industries during his career. For example, consumer goods companies and financial services businesses (including banks) have often made up a large proportion of his portfolio. Certainly, he has invested in other areas over the years. However, his portfolio is perhaps more concentrated on a limited number of sectors that many investors would expect it to be. A key reason for this is that Buffett only invests in companies and industries that he fully understands. This could be a logical approach for any investor to take, since it can allow them to develop a competitive advantage versus their peers. It also means that they are likely to have a higher chance of being able to spot undervalued companies on a relative and absolute basis. They can also more easily avoid stocks that are being overhyped by other investors. Developing knowledge of sectors slowly over time Clearly, it is not possible to become an expert in every sector of the stock market. Even Warren Buffett does not attempt to achieve that goal. However, it could be possible for any investor to develop deep knowledge of a specific industry over time. For example, they may read industry journals and follow the investor updates of companies operating in a specific sector to gain knowledge as to which businesses have the greatest competitive advantages. Such information is arguably more widely available now than it was in the past. Although using it to build knowledge does not guarantee investment success, it could improve an investor’s capacity to outperform the stock market over the long run. Using tracker funds in the meantime While following Warren Buffett’s lead in building knowledge about specific sectors, it may be prudent to use tracker funds in the meantime. They can provide exposure to the stock market prior to sufficient expertise being developed to invest directly in stocks in specific industries. Although even the most knowledgeable of investors still make mistakes and lose money on investments, having a solid understanding of a small number of industries may be a logical approach to take in what is a fast-moving economy. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading UK share investing: 2 top stocks I’d buy in my Stocks and Shares ISA Should I invest in Cineworld shares now? I’d drip-feed £250 a month into top UK shares in an ISA to aim to retire in comfort How I’d generate a passive income from UK shares starting today How I’d start earning passive income to supplement my wages Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Why I’d follow this aspect of Warren Buffett’s strategy when buying cheap UK shares appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  34. Warren Buffett-backed BYD ships 100 EV Tang SUV to Normay (07/06/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  35. Warren Buffett's $10 billion mistake: Precision Castparts (27/02/2021 - Investing.com)

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  36. Warren Buffett resigns as Gates Foundation trustee (23/06/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  37. In 1999, Warren Buffett was asked what you should do to get as rich as him—his advice still applies today (24/07/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Warren Buffett's advice from 1999 on how he'd invest $10,000 (cnbc.com) Published Fri, Jul 23 2021 9:00 AM EDT Updated Sat, Jul 24 2021 1:10 AM EDT Nicolas [email protected] If you want to be as rich as Warren Buffett, don’t wait to get started. That’s the advice that the investing titan shared in 1999 at Berkshire Hathaway’s annual shareholders meeting when asked how to make $30 billion, which was roughly his net worth at the time. The then-68-year-old Buffett — whose fortune has since grown to more than $100 billion — said that compound interest is an investor’s best friend and compared building wealth through interest to rolling a snowball down a hill. “Start early,” Buffett said. “I started building this little snowball at the top of a very long hill. The trick to have a very long hill is either starting very young or living to be very old.” The Oracle of Omaha said that if he were graduating from college in 1999 and had $10,000 to invest, he would be strategic about choosing where to put his money. “I probably would focus on smaller companies because I would be working with smaller sums and there’s more chance that something is overlooked in that arena,” Buffett explained, saying he would start examining companies alphabetically and work his way from there. Investors, Buffett explained, need to fend for themselves and rely on their own knowledge and intuition when searching for promising businesses to invest in. He added that savvy investors would do best to “learn what you know and what you don’t” and act “very vigorously” when they see something they consider to be a good opportunity. “You can’t look around for people to agree with you,” Buffett said of putting money into an investment. “You can’t look around for people to even know what you’re talking about.” That said, Buffett is also a staunch supporter of index funds, which hold every stock in an index, making them automatically diversified. To build wealth, investors should “consistently buy an S&P 500 low-cost index fund,” Buffett said in 2017. “Keep buying it through thick and thin, and especially through thin.” Still, Buffett said that aspiring to make $30 billion is unnecessary, and recently said that the size of his fortune is “incomprehensible.” “The money makes very little difference after a moderate level,” he said. He continued: “If you asked me to trade away a very significant percentage of my net worth either for some extra years on my life or being able to do during those years what I want to do, I’d do it in a second.”   submitted by   /u/SavannahSmiles_ [link]   [comments]
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  38. Passive income investing: 2 pieces of advice from Warren Buffett (20/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Generating income via dividends from stocks is one of the most appealing ways for me to build wealth. There are plenty of ideas out there to look at for passive income investing. And in this regard, I often listen to Warren Buffett’s pearls of wisdom. I tie his ideas in to dividend stocks and income investing, to help me hopefully pick the best ones to reach my goals. Playing the long game As someone who has been investing successfully longer than I’ve been alive, Warren Buffett is clearly someone to listen to. As it turns out, longevity is one of the things that makes passive income investing work. Buffett once said that “someone’s sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago.” What he meant by this is that good things can take time to happen, but the end result is well worth the time. It’s the same with getting dividends from stocks. For example, I might be aiming to make £1,000 a month in passive income. With a small pot to begin with, this isn’t going to happen overnight.  I’ll have to regularly invest small amounts so that over several years, my investment pot will be large enough to give me a yield to equate to £1,000 a month. But once I’ve got there, it’ll be worth the wait. Looking for sustainable passive income  Warren Buffett once commented that “risk comes from not knowing what you’re doing”. This can be applied to many situations in investing, especially when targeting passive income.  The tendency for a new investor might be to simply buy shares in companies that have the highest dividend yields. If it was me, I might reason that I’d  get the highest income that way.  In reality, companies with the highest dividend yields often carry the highest level of risk of a dividend cut. This is because the yield could look high just because the share price is falling. After all, a lower share price makes the dividend per share a larger proportion overall. If I didn’t know this or hadn’t done my research on the share price, I could make a bad call here. To deal with this, I just need to make sure I’m not focused solely on the monetary dividend values for passive income investing. It also needs to be about the company. What are the prospects for 2021? How has the business coped with the pandemic? In this way, the dividends I get paid will be more sustainable, even if it means taking a slightly lower dividend yield. Overall, by looking at the thoughts of Warren Buffett, I can give myself a better shot at making my passive income investing strategy a success. One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading Can I get a mortgage without a deposit? Should I buy Argo Blockchain shares at the current price? The FTSE 100 has hit 7,000. Here are 4 reasons I think it could rise further 2 cheap penny stocks and 1 FTSE 100 share to buy in my ISA! 2 penny stocks to buy in a Stocks and Shares ISA today jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Passive income investing: 2 pieces of advice from Warren Buffett appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  39. Berkshire Hathaway shareholders pressure Warren Buffett on ESG issues (04/05/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  40. Warren Buffett eases up on talk of a big acquisition in his annual letter (27/02/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  41. Warren Buffett on Diversification (10/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  42. What will Warren Buffett say about valuations after calling 2019 prices sky-high? (25/02/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  43. Warren Buffett says Greg Abel is his likely successor at Berkshire Hathaway (03/05/2021 - Investing.com)

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  44. A share I’d pick after reading Warren Buffett letters (27/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The annual release of the Warren Buffett letters always makes headlines. The Sage of Omaha offers up free advice based on his legendary investing prowess. Here is an example of one share I’d pick based on what I’ve learnt from Buffett’s missives. Warren Buffett letters emphasise pricing power One of the reasons Buffett has gotten so rich is his expertise in spotting the difference between what it costs to produce something and the price at which it can be sold. Think about gas as an example. It’s basically a commodity – if you price your gas above the market rate, customers can just shift their purchase to a competing gas company. With a unique brand, by contrast, a company can gain what is known as ‘pricing power’. That means it is able to charge more for their product or service. Pricing power is obviously important as a way to enable more attractive profit margins for a business. Buffett’s holding in Coca Cola shows the principle in action. While the ingredients are inexpensive, Coke’s unique recipe and branding allows it to achieve attractive margins for its sugared water. Warren Buffett letters across the years praise Coke for the durability of its franchise. A UK pick with pricing power Applying this principle directly, there are several UK shares which catch my eye. For example, one could consider Coca Cola HBC. The London-listed company is one of Coke’s bottlers. From its Greek roots – the “H” in its name stands for Hellenic – it now operates across multiple European markets, including Ireland. But instead of looking at a bottler, I am more tempted to look at a brand owner close to Coke itself. As a bottler, it’s hard to make money without bottling and selling drinks. But a brand owner can use the long-term power of its brand building to make it into the future, a clear attraction highlighted in most years’ Warren Buffett letters. One company that comes to mind is AG Barr (LSE: BAG). This Glasgow-based purveyor of sparkling drinks is famous for its iconic Irn-Bru drink. The orange-coloured carbonated beverage is very popular across Scotland, where for decades it has vied with Coke for the top spot. But it is not limited to Scotland – Barr has worked to make inroads into the market in England too. Too much focus on one revenue source can make a company vulnerable. The company has a portfolio of other drinks which allows it to make more efficient use of its distribution network, although its key brand remains Irn-Bru. Clearly the pandemic took some shine off the company, which said last month its full-year revenue would fall around 11%. It suspended the dividend last year, although it expects to reinstate it this year. The shares are trading on a price-to-earnings ratio of 19, which isn’t cheap. But the Warren Buffett letters emphasise that it’s better to pay a good price for a great company rather than a great price for a good company. Is Barr a great company? Its recent performance has disappointed a little, but its strong Irn-Bru brand gives it the sort of pricing power and longevity Buffett loves. I’d pick it as the sort of company Buffett principles would lead me to buy. There’s a ‘double agent’ hiding in the FTSE… we recommend you buy it! Don’t miss our special stock presentation. It contains details of a UK-listed company our Motley Fool UK analysts are extremely enthusiastic about. They think it’s offering an incredible opportunity to grow your wealth over the long term – at its current price – regardless of what happens in the wider market. That’s why they’re referring to it as the FTSE’s ‘double agent’. Because they believe it’s working both with the market… And against it. To find out why we think you should add it to your portfolio today… Click here to get access to our presentation, and learn how to get the name of this 'double agent'! More reading 2 of the best growing dividend stocks to buy now christopherruane has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended AG Barr. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post A share I’d pick after reading Warren Buffett letters appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  45. I’d use Warren Buffett’s advice to aim to beat the stock market (10/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Warren Buffett has generally held a negative viewpoint of gold over recent decades. Some investors have sought refuge in the precious metal during periods of economic uncertainty. But he has instead purchased shares in high-quality companies when they trade at low prices. His strategy has been hugely successful. It has easily outperformed the stock market over the long run. It could continue to do so in future. Gold has its benefits, of course. But rather than investing money in gold while the economy currently faces a challenging near-term future, I think purchasing undervalued stocks could be a profitable move. Stock market track record Warren Buffett’s avoidance of gold and focus on shares may be partly due to the track record of the stock market. Even though it has experienced numerous downturns in the past, it has always recovered from them. Therefore, a strategy that seeks to buy cheap stocks and hold them in the long run has generally been a sound means of taking advantage of the market cycle. Many investors buy gold when economic uncertainty is high. That makes sense as its defensive qualities mean that it is usually less correlated to the prospects for global GDP growth. But buying gold at such times can also mean paying a high price that limits capital growth opportunities. Furthermore, investor sentiment has always improved following even the very worst market downturns. As such, Buffett’s strategy of banking on a recovery via cheap stocks could be more profitable than buying gold ahead of a likely reduction in risk-aversion among investors. Warren Buffett’s focus on quality Of course, Warren Buffett does not only seek to buy cheap stocks. He focuses on the quality of a company above all else. For him, this means identifying businesses with wide economic moats. For example, this may be a unique product, strong brand loyalty or a cost base that is significantly lower than sector peers. A wide economic moat can produce higher margins, more resilient financial performance, and faster-growing profitability in the long run. Buffett seeks to identify high-quality companies when they temporarily trade at low prices. This may be caused by economic weakness, but could also be prompted by weak industry operating conditions. Where a company has a wide economic moat, a sound strategy to overcome short-term difficulties, and the financial means to put its plan into action, Buffett has often invested. A long-term view A strategy that seeks to buy high-quality companies at low prices requires a long time horizon. While the economy has always returned to growth following recessions, and the stock market has made gains following every previous downturn, it can take time for these events to take place. Warren Buffett has always had an extremely long time horizon. This provides scope for all of his purchases to recover from their short-term challenges. In doing so, they have often outperformed the wider stock market and produced returns that are significantly higher than those of gold. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading UK stock investing: 2 of the best dividend shares to buy right now How I’d identify the best growth shares to buy now in this stock market rally I’m investing £300k to grab my stake in this £71bn in share dividends Should I buy ITV stock today? Is a stock market crash imminent? Here’s what I think Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post I’d use Warren Buffett’s advice to aim to beat the stock market appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  46. I’d use these steps from the Warren Buffett/Charlie Munger investing method today (02/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger are two of the most successful and revered investors of all time. They’ve delivered market-beating returns on a consistent basis over a long period of time. Although following their strategies may not guarantee high returns, it could have a positive impact on an investor’s portfolio in the long run. As such, by focusing on industries that an investor understands, looking beyond short-term market movements and holding some cash, it may be possible to earn relatively attractive returns from equities. Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger’s limited knowledge Despite their track record of high returns, Buffett and Munger don’t invest in every industry available to them. In fact, many of their most successful investments over the years have been in the consumer goods and banking sectors. They’ve often overlooked technology businesses, as well as other sectors that many other investors have profited from. The main reason for this is that Buffett and Munger prefer to focus their capital in sectors they fully understand and where they may have a competitive advantage versus other investors. This may reduce the risk of their investments, since they fully comprehend the potential threats that may be ahead. Similarly, it may mean higher return potential. This is because they’re able to identify the most appealing investments in an industry at a given point in time. Although following a similar approach means an investor may miss out on some attractive buying opportunities, the success of Buffett and Munger shows that investors don’t necessarily need to be experts in all industries to outperform the stock market. Looking beyond short-term market movements Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger also look beyond short-term market movements when investing. This allows them to avoid becoming too fearful in a market downturn. This enables them to buy stocks when other investors are selling them. Equally, in a bull market they rarely become excited about a stock market rally. This helps them to avoid overpaying for shares when other investors are allowing their optimism to cloud their judgment. By taking a long-term view, it’s possible to more easily capitalise on the stock market cycle. It shows that gains and losses for the market have never previously lasted in perpetuity. By understanding this cycle, and seeking to profit from it, it may be possible to earn higher returns in the long run. Holding cash Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger also hold relatively large amounts of cash at all times. They don’t rely on its returns, but rather use it to be able to respond quickly to short-term market movements that can create temporary buying opportunities. Holding some cash may also provide peace of mind during uncertain periods. As the 2020 market crash showed, stock markets can recover quickly from their downturns. Through being in a position to react quickly, it may be easier to take advantage of short-term mispricings. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading Stock market rally: is it too late to buy and hold cheap dividend stocks? Budget 2021: 3 ways it could impact my investments UK stock market: here’s how much profit I might have lost if I hadn’t stayed invested 5% dividend yield! A cheap UK dividend share I’d buy today and aim to hold for 10 years A cheap UK dividend growth share I’d buy in my ISA this March Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post I’d use these steps from the Warren Buffett/Charlie Munger investing method today appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  47. Warren Buffett says about the stock market... (04/03/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  48. How to Teach Yourself Investing - Warren Buffett (11/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
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  49. Warren Buffett leaves Gates Foundation, has donated half his wealth (23/06/2021 - Investing.com)

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