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28 July 2021
19:07 hour

What is working from home tax relief?

The Motley Fool UK

21/07/2021 - 17:02

The number of people claiming working from home tax relief has grown significantly due to Covid-19. But how do you claim it? We take a look. The post What is working from home tax relief? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.


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  1. Tax Relief for Work from Home: Need of the hour during Corona times (03/06/2021 - Financial Express)
    The government is thinking a lot about how to provide tax exemption to the employees who are working from home.
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  2. How to claim tax relief on coronavirus working from home expenses (17/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Coronavirus has pushed everyone to make adjustments to the life they had before the outbreak. Working from home is now the new normal for most individuals who worked in the office before COVID-19. Have you noticed that working from home expenses may have led to an increase in your household expenditure? If your answer is yes, you can claim tax relief on these additional expenses. What are coronavirus working from home expenses? Look back at what you spent each month in your household before the coronavirus outbreak and note the amount down. Now, look at how much you spend each month having started working from home and note down the amount. What is the difference? The difference is what is being referred to as coronavirus working from home expenses. For clarity purposes, your additional expenses might be due to an increase in your water, heating, phone and internet bills working from home. It may also be from purchasing something or paying for a subscription you require for work purposes. This does not include expenses that would remain constant, whether working in an office or from home. How do you make your calculations? From the tax year that started on 6th April 2020, you can claim tax relief at a rate of £6 per week. For previous tax years, you can claim tax relief at a rate of £4 per week. Keep in mind that you might only be able to claim tax relief within four years of the end of the tax year that you spent your money. This means that within the current tax year of 2020/2021, you might only be able to claim tax relief for the money you spent from the tax year 2016/2017. You have two options: 1)  Claim tax relief to the amount of £6 per week on coronavirus working from home expenses. In this case, you do not need to provide receipts. If you fall under the basic tax rate band of 20%, you can claim tax relief on the amount of £6 per week from the tax year 2020/2021. This means that you could get 20% of £6 = £1.20 each week in tax relief. The amount of tax relief you can claim may, of course, change based on your tax rate band, and that is why you might come across statements like you can claim tax relief to the tune of £6 per week, up to £124. In the basic tax rate band, you pay tax at a rate of 20%, which comes to £1.20 in tax relief a week. This amounts to approximately £62 in a year. If you are in the higher tax rate band, you pay tax at a rate of 40%, which comes to £2.40 in tax relief a week. This amounts to approximately £124 in a year. For the tax years 2016/2017, 2017/2018, 2018/2019 and 2019/2020, you can claim tax relief on £4 per week. This means that you could get 20% of £4 = £0.80 each week in tax relief. 2)  Claim tax relief on the exact amount you spend per week on coronavirus working from home expenses. You may need to keep all your receipts and bills as evidence. If you fall under the basic tax rate band of 20%, you can claim tax relief on the coronavirus working from home expenses you incur per week. Of course, you might have different values each week. If your additional working from home expenses amount to £100 in a particular week, you could get 20% of £100 = £20 that week in tax relief, considering the factors mentioned above. Claiming tax relief on coronavirus working from home expenses How you claim tax relief depends on various factors. For example: If your employer has not or has paid some of your expenses; The number of jobs you have; If you usually complete a self-assessment returns form. There are three ways to claim tax relief: online, by post and by phone. Claim your tax relief online if your employer has not paid back any of your working from home expenses. The same applies where your employer has paid some of the expenses. Your tax relief claim needs to be calculated on the amount that has not been refunded. You might need a Government Gateway user ID and password. If you have multiple jobs, you might need to claim your tax relief by post. You are expected to fill out this form, print it and send it to HMRC. If you usually complete a self-assessment returns form, you can claim your coronavirus working from home expenses as part of the form. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading 2 of the best FTSE 250 dividend shares to buy in the UK today The Marston’s share price has jumped! Should I buy the stock? Brits twice as likely to gamble than seek advice to improve their finances Why EHang’s share price just fell 63% Why I’m using diversification to improve my long-term investing strategy The post How to claim tax relief on coronavirus working from home expenses appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  3. TaxWatch: Can you claim the home office tax deduction if you’ve been working at home? Read this first (18/02/2021 - Market Watch)
    More than eight in 10 people who've been working from home anticipate the arrangement will be permanent.
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  4. : Tens of thousands of public servants face delays accessing student-loan relief — due to a simple oversight (14/06/2021 - Market Watch)
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  5. Outside the Box: Ripping away enhanced unemployment benefits will disproportionately harm working-class moms (26/05/2021 - Market Watch)
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  6. Don’t give in to airports’ Covid-relief demand (07/06/2021 - Financial Express)
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  7. Interview: GYANENDRA SINGH, Head of Audio, Sony India: Hybrid working has influenced the demand for audio in India (22/06/2021 - Financial Express)
    In the personal audio segment, work from home (WFH), learn from home (LFH) and workout at home have given further impetus to the already strong demand for headphones.
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  8. 4 top tips to cut down on WFH costs (24/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Lockdown and government stay-at-home orders have seen many companies in the UK shift their employees into remote work. And while working from home (WFH) has its benefits, not the least of which is not having to fight your way through a crowded tube station every morning, there’s one big downside. If you’re not careful, costs such as heating can easily spiral out of control. So, to help you cut down on your WFH costs, we explore some top tips worth considering. [top_pitch] WFH: what’s the effect on household costs? According to price comparison site Quotezone, a combination of recurring lockdowns, particularly during winter, and the new normal of working from home has led to a spike in household bills across the country.  The data reveals a 17% spike in domestic energy consumption over the last year, with the average annual energy bill rising from £688 in 2019 to £802 in 2020. Although the pandemic is nearing its end, the rise in energy costs is expected to continue. That’s because working from home may become a permanent arrangement for many. In fact, research suggests that one in four Brits hope not to return to the office. On top of that, energy regulator, Ofgem, has already announced that due to an increase in wholesale energy prices, the price cap will return to its pre-pandemic levels. Many of us are now wondering how we can cut down on WFH costs so that we’re not left out of pocket at the end of every month. How can you cut your WFH costs? Here are four top tips from Quotezone’s CEO, Greg Wilson, to help you reduce your working from home costs. 1. Switch providers You can save up to £360 by switching providers. By doing so you might be able to access better rates as well as suppliers with better customer service or who are, for example, more environmentally conscious. To increase your odds of getting the best possible deal, take your time to shop around and compare prices using a price comparison site such as Quotezone. 2. Thermostat control The average household can save as much as £60 every year by turning the thermostat down by just one degree. That’s according to the Energy Saving Trust. In the long term, you can prevent energy wastage by installing heating controls in your home. Some thermostats can even be controlled using your phone. That means that you can stay on top of your energy use whenever and wherever you need to. 3. Making your home more efficient A few simple modifications and changes around your home, such as using energy-efficient bulbs, can help you cut down on your WFH costs over the long term. 4. Claim tax relief Are you aware that you can claim tax relief on coronavirus WFH costs such as gas, electricity, water and even business phone calls? Claiming tax relief can go a long way toward lowering your overall WFH costs and can put some much-needed extra cash in your pocket. [middle_pitch] Takeaway While some of us thrive in a WFH environment, others find it completely unappealing. Whichever group you belong to, one thing is certain: working from home can be expensive if you’re not careful. In a time when every penny counts, it is more important than ever to make sure you’re staying on top of your household bills and spending. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading Is the Lloyds share price undervalued? UK shares: if I could buy just one FTSE 100 stock, this would be it Can I buy shares in MusicMagpie? As the Rolls-Royce share price falls, I’m still buying 3 penny stocks I’d buy in my ISA and look to hold until 2030 The post 4 top tips to cut down on WFH costs appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  9. : Home Depot deploys Bluetooth to combat organized retail crime, by preventing stolen items from working (27/07/2021 - Market Watch)
    Home Depot's efforts come after Target changed store hours to deter shoplifters.
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  10. The Wall Street Journal: Facebook to expand work-from-home eligibility as offices look to reopen (10/06/2021 - Market Watch)
    Facebook Inc. is giving most of its employees a choice: Seek permission to keep working at home or go to the office at least half the time.
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  11. Personal Finance Daily: How your company can make working from home even better and what to do if you find an old lien on your home (15/03/2021 - Market Watch)
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  12. The Margin: Why many people who make over $100,000 will likely continue to work from home (16/07/2021 - Market Watch)
    As the economy continues to reopen and recover from the coronavirus pandemic, the debate over remote work vs. in-office work continues. But new data shows working from home could be here to stay for a lot of high earners.
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  13. Assam microfinance relief package ‘positive’ from asset quality perspective (22/06/2021 - Financial Express)
    Assam's microfinance relief scheme is a “positive development” from an asset quality perspective and the relief provided is expected to reduce near-term loan losses for lenders, who were affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.
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  14. Encore: To what extent will working from home continue? (03/05/2021 - Market Watch)
    Workers of all ages seem to like it
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  15. F1 international student capital gains tax stumping question (03/07/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Hey everyone! I am an F1 international student in USA holding an American mnc's stocks that were vested for me when I was in my home country and was working in said MNC from my home country... Now I hold 70 odd stocks and my question is if I sell them now where do I have to pay the capital gains? To my home country govt or us govt? If in us, In which case since I don't earn anything in us this year will I be free from capital gains? Else if I have to pay in my home country and don't make any money over there in the next fiscal year will that mean my capital gains will be taxed accordingly(implying zero capital gains for the lowest slab)?   submitted by   /u/nikolai_10 [link]   [comments]
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  16. Tax Guy: Disaster tax-relief measures in the latest pandemic aid bill could help people impacted by the South’s deep freeze (25/02/2021 - Market Watch)
    You or your business may qualify for disaster tax-relief provisions included in the Consolidated Appropriations Act.
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  17. Tax Guy: Disaster tax-relief measures in the latest pandemic aid bill could help people impacted by the South’s deep freeze (25/02/2021 - Market Watch)
    You or your business may qualify for disaster tax-relief provisions included in the Consolidated Appropriations Act.
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  18. The Wall Street Journal: Strains, sprains and pinched nerves: Injuries at home are on the rise (23/04/2021 - Market Watch)
    For more than a year, some of us have been working in makeshift offices, hunched over computers on beds, floors or coffee tables. Stuck at home, we’ve taken on projects and have been climbing ladders, painting walls and using tools that once collected dust in the basement. Some of us stopped exercising entirely—or launched into fitness routines without proper preparation.
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  19. The Wall Street Journal: Strains, sprains and pinched nerves: Injuries at home are on the rise (23/04/2021 - Market Watch)
    For more than a year, some of us have been working in makeshift offices, hunched over computers on beds, floors or coffee tables. Stuck at home, we’ve taken on projects and have been climbing ladders, painting walls and using tools that once collected dust in the basement. Some of us stopped exercising entirely—or launched into fitness routines without proper preparation.
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  20. Salaried employee working from home? Check Income Tax rules for e-filing ITR on new portal (08/06/2021 - Financial Express)
    Income Tax Return (ITR) filing for salaried employees during work from home 2021: The Income Tax filing season has started.
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  21. Capitol Report: As Democratic aid bill gives $25 billion to restaurants, industry says it’s a ‘strong step,’ but more will be needed (02/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    The restaurant industry's largest lobbying group is working to ensure that Democrats’ big COVID-19 relief package doesn't leave out eateries at the last minute, as the organization also says that it expects more aid for the hard-hit sector will be necessary.
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  22. Capitol Report: As Democratic aid bill gives $25 billion to restaurants, industry says it’s a ‘strong step,’ but more will be needed (02/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    The restaurant industry's largest lobbying group is working to ensure that Democrats’ big COVID-19 relief package doesn't leave out eateries at the last minute, as the organization also says that it expects more aid for the hard-hit sector will be necessary.
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  23. Home Smart Home: Variety of products to offer (27/02/2021 - Financial Express)
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  24. Capitol Report: Restaurants wait for chance to tap into $28.6 billion relief fund: ‘We will be one of the first ones in line’ (24/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    Now that Democrats’ $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill has been signed into law, the wait is on for the launch of the huge package’s new aid program for restaurants.
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  25. Capitol Report: Here’s who will get $1,400 stimulus checks with House set to approve $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill (09/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    There is a change in who's getting stimulus checks in Washington's next big relief package, as President Joe Biden has agreed to new income limits.
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  26. Capitol Report: Here’s who will get $1,400 stimulus checks with House set to approve $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill (09/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    There is a change in who's getting stimulus checks in Washington's next big relief package, as President Joe Biden has agreed to new income limits.
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  27. : Door is shut to millions of American homeowners in need of mortgage relief as pandemic enters Year 2 (23/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    Some 14.5 million single-family home loans are privately owned, with no federal backing, and occupy a gray area when it comes to government programs delaying foreclosure proceedings and granting payment forbearance.
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  28. : Door is shut to millions of American homeowners in need of mortgage relief as pandemic enters Year 2 (23/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    Some 14.5 million single-family home loans are privately owned, with no federal backing, and occupy a gray area when it comes to government programs delaying foreclosure proceedings and granting payment forbearance.
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  29. NerdWallet: Why 6 million unlucky borrowers can’t get student loan relief (22/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    Here’s why some Federal Family Education Loan borrowers aren’t receiving relief and what they can do to cope with their loan debt.
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  30. Haryana extends relief to real estate by declaring April, May a Zero Period (17/06/2021 - Financial Express)
    The Haryana government has taken a prudent step by granting relief on interest and other time-bound compliances for April and May, which will help the realty sector to bounce back and return to normalcy soon.
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  31. : Goldman Sachs CEO: Working from home is an ‘aberration’ (25/02/2021 - Market Watch)
    David Solomon cited collaboration as a reason for bankers to return to the office.
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  32. : Feds announce COVID-related assistance for disabled student loan borrowers, falling short of relief urged by advocates (29/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    Advocates have been calling on the Biden administration to automatically cancel the debt of borrowers who are entitled to relief under the disability discharge program
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  33. Buy This, Not That: This woman may have ‘the tidiest home in the country’ — here’s the smart $9 item she recommends to keep your home office organized (20/05/2021 - Market Watch)
    Plus, 5 other things home organizers say you need for your home office.
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  34. What Covid-19 has taught us about working from home (23/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Working from home seems like the best thing ever. You can work in your pyjamas, take as many breaks as needed and nap with the kids or the dog if you feel like it, right? Well, the reality doesn’t exactly look like that, does it? Sure, working from home has many benefits, but being part of the remote workforce does come with its own challenges as well. And with so many people now working remotely due to the pandemic, things have changed even more. Misconceptions about working from home You can work in your pyjamas As a general rule, you definitely don’t need to dress up to work from home. That said, in many industries, working from home includes plenty of Zoom meetings, so you have to look ‘presentable’ most days once you turn the computer on.  You can work whenever you want While many companies support a flexible schedule, many others have set hours for their remote workers. That means you’ll have scheduled meetings, phone calls, and deadlines that might require you to be in front of the screen during standard office hours. You’ll enjoy a better work-life balance Working from home will save you commute time. If your office is an hour from home, that’s two more hours a day you have to spend with your loved ones, read a book or enjoy a movie. But working from home doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll have more free time during the day to play catch with the dog. In fact, working from home can lead to more interruptions, which can then result in working longer so you don’t miss any deadlines. And if you have young kids at home, boundaries are harder to enforce, so you might not get as much quiet time as you need.  What working from home is really like The reality is that working from home is still working. You’ll have to put in the time and possibly extra effort to make sure there’s effective communication with coworkers and your boss. Regular catch-ups are a must, even if you don’t have scheduled meetings. The negatives Being at home might save you money in some ways, but you might still need to pay for daycare or a babysitter to help with the kids. Children demand attention and if you have to cook for them, entertain them and answer constant questions, your work productivity will suffer. The same is true if you don’t have a quiet, dedicated space or the correct equipment for your work. Remote working can also be lonely. You’ll miss the socialisation and interaction that comes with being at work – or even the lunch breaks with friends near the office. The positives Perhaps one of the biggest benefits of working from home is that it’ll save you time and money – up to £500 a month, according to recent research by protecting.co.uk. No lunches out, no transportation or parking costs, less electricity used in constantly having to wash work clothing. It all adds up.  How working from home changed forever through the pandemic The pandemic and its lockdowns have made working from home a lot more commonplace. According to research from the University of Kent and the University of Birmingham, 86% of us have worked from home at least at some point during the pandemic. The changes have been huge. Before the coronavirus lockdowns, 37% of non-parent female workers and 28% of non-parent male workers worked from home. Those numbers have grown to 93% and 94% respectively since the pandemic started.  According to the survey, the experience has been mostly positive, reducing commuting time, increasing time spent with family (and pets) and improving mental health. Going forward, the research suggests that more employees will likely request work from home options post-lockdown. This is in part because the concerns that once existed about distance working are long gone and choosing to work from home will no longer negatively impact career outcomes. A number of experts interviewed by the BBC recently expressed their belief that the pandemic might have changed the way we work forever. What will the future bring? Likely a hybrid way of working that allows more flexible working times and more remote working in all industries. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading Long-term stock market investing in a shaky economic backdrop Stock market recovery: I’d buy value shares now to hold Why Diageo and Unilever are on my ‘best shares to buy’ list despite this threat 2 UK shares I’d buy in my Stocks and Shares ISA in March The Rolls-Royce share price: have we seen the bottom? The post What Covid-19 has taught us about working from home appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  35. Market Extra: Here’s why bond investors are calling for the Fed to give banks relief on capital rules (15/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    Calls are heating up for the Federal Reserve to extend relief on bank capital requirements to help prevent the near $20 trillion government bond market from coming under siege.
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  36. Breaking: US Senate votes to pass 1.9T pandemic relief bill, positive outlook on equities (06/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/06/covid-stimulus-update-senate-passes-1point9-trillion-relief-bill.html ​ The US Senate just passed the 1.9T pandemic relief bill after negotiating with a centrist Democrat for the final vote to break the 50-50 tie. After a month of a downtrend in equities, on Friday, markets rallied into the green. I expect that this bill will likely kick off next week further into green territory as more households, especially those who are making less than 70k per year can anticipate a 1400 check in the coming weeks.   submitted by   /u/investstayhumble [link]   [comments]
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  37. Outside the Box: 5 ways your company can make working from home even better (15/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    CEO shares best practices that have helped his company's workers cope with COVID-19 challenges.
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  38. Outside the Box: 5 ways your company can make working from home even better (15/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    CEO shares best practices that have helped his company's workers cope with COVID-19 challenges.
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  39. : Biden’s $2.25 trillion infrastructure package could shorten your daily commute, some experts say (31/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    'Even with more Americans working from home, we will need these improvements,' said Matt Casale, director of U.S. PIRG’s Environment Campaigns.
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  40. Working from home? Give your vehicle required protection by investing in TP, fire and theft insurance cover (24/02/2021 - Financial Express)
    While your car is parked at your residence, there are some other possible damages for which you must have adequate coverage to compensate for the loss.
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  41. : Biden’s $2.25 trillion infrastructure package could shorten your daily commute, some experts say (31/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    'Even with more Americans working from home, we will need these improvements,' said Matt Casale, director of U.S. PIRG’s Environment Campaigns.
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  42. The Moneyist: I’m 68, earn $130,000 and love eco-travel in Peru, Brazil and Africa. I want to travel while I can, but I’m scared to stop working (30/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    ‘I have a little over $300,000 in savings and $400,000 equity in my own home. I also have about $835,000 in a 401(k).’
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  43. Big Relief, Small Stimulus: Credit boost main plank, fiscal cost just a fraction of Rs 6.29-lakh-crore package (29/06/2021 - Financial Express)
    While the aggregate relief, as estimated by the government amounted to Rs 6.29 lakh crore, a sizeable chunk of Rs 2.68 lakh crore is credit to be facilitated.
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  44. Lego Group, The Lego Foundation donate $1 mn to support COVID-19 relief efforts (13/05/2021 - Financial Express)
    In addition to the contribution to Save the Children India, the LEGO Group said it is also supporting the state government's relief efforts in Maharashtra where the LEGO Group's Mumbai office is located.
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  45. The Wall Street Journal: What working from home taught us about our office setups (07/06/2021 - Market Watch)
    As more employees prepare to return to commuting, they can apply more than a year’s worth of wisdom for what did and didn’t work in their Zoom rooms.
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  46. The Escape Home: Are second homes getting too expensive in the U.S.? Here are 6 you can own abroad for under $230,000 (25/06/2021 - Market Watch)
    Home may be where the heart is, but when it comes to home buying, maybe the passport should come into play.
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  47. In the office full-time? No thanks, say 86 per cent of tech professionals (02/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    As restrictions continue to lift and companies prepare to bring employees back to the workplace, many workers don’t want to return to the office full-time. Technology professionals are no exception. In fact, 86 per cent of them want a work from home arrangement after the pandemic, according to a survey by tech job market platform Hackajob, which shared its findings exclusively with City A.M. Only 14 per cent of the 1,700 tech professionals surveyed want to go back to a company office full-time, while around one in four would like to work remote permanently. Sixty per cent are happy to work from the office occasionally and spend the rest of the week working from home. “Hybrid working is the new deal breaker for tech professionals,” stressed Mark Chaffey, co-founder and CEO of Hackajob. “Although working from home may not have been the easiest for individuals this past year, tech professionals clearly find the value in not being in the office every day. Employees are feeling more comfortable and happier working from home, having cultivated a work-life balance,” Chaffey told City A.M. He added tech professionals are just as productive when working from home, even more so in fact thanks to fewer distractions and no commute. Moving on Interestingly, the survey reveals that 80 per cent of tech professionals don’t think they will be working for the same company in two years. This suggests employees care more about job flexibility and gratification than permanent jobs, private healthcare and pensions, Chaffey said. “For baby boomers and Generation X, it was quite common to stay in the same company for most of their working lives. Today’s working landscape is different, with millennials and Generation Z open to the concept of job hopping,” he continued. “People changing jobs every year or two can be seen by employers as a red flag but, actually, it shows these people are ambitious, adaptable and knowledgeable, traits that every employer looks for.” Hiring processes The survey also highlights the need for potential employers to ditch CVs and eliminate the bias that still exists in the hiring process today. More than half (57 per cent) of tech professionals want to be assessed on their skills, not their CVs or indeed their gender, ethnicity, education, sexuality, disability and socio-economic status. In addition, many say blind interview processes are crucial if organisations are to both hire people based on their potential and commit to creating a diverse and inclusive culture in the workplace. While 77 per cent of those surveyed feel their current employer’s Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) policy is either ‘good’ or ‘excellent’, a deeper dive into the findings shows there is more work to be done. Nearly a third (32 per cent) of people who do not identify as male rate their company’s D&I policy as either ‘satisfactory’ or ‘poor’. Looking further into the job titles of the respondents certain specialists are not as happy with their current employers’ approach to diversity and inclusion as their colleagues, according to the survey https://www.cityam.com/in-the-office-full-time-no-thanks-say-86-per-cent-of-tech-professionals/   submitted by   /u/John-Galt-Lover [link]   [comments]
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  48. Bond Report: U.S. Treasury yields bounce off lows after Fed allows regulatory relief to expire (19/03/2021 - Market Watch)
    U.S. Treasury yields were off their overnight lows on Friday after the Federal Reserve allowed regulatory relief for banks to expire, adding to concerns demand for Treasurys could fade in the coming months.
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  49. How much do these COVID relief packages affect bond yields? (06/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I'm still rather new to this all and was wondering if these stimulus payments and whatnot increase bond yields, which have been driving the market dramatically the past few weeks. In longterm, I don't think this will really matter, but short term? What do you guys think? Will Monday be green or red, considering the COVID relief package and bond yields?   submitted by   /u/CMShortboy [link]   [comments]
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