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28 July 2021
18:37 hour

The Anglo American share price is soaring. Should I finally buy?

The Motley Fool UK

21/07/2021 - 16:33

The Anglo American share price has not been held back by the global pandemic. With commodities rising, is it a top 2021 buy? The post The Anglo American share price is soaring. Should I finally buy? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.


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  1. 3 reasons why the Anglo American share price dropped 12% last week (21/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    On Friday, the FTSE 100 dropped over 1.5% in a single day to end the week on a sour note. For Anglo American (LSE:AAL), Friday simply compounded a bad week all round. The Anglo American share price was the worst performer in the FTSE 100 index last week. It fell over 12%, to close the week just above 2,700p. What happened? Falling palladium, rising inflation When a stock falls in double-digits in a single week, there are usually several things that contribute to it. This was the case with the Anglo American share price.  The first reason for the tumble was related to the price of palladium. It’s a precious metal that has several important uses. The largest use of palladium is in catalytic converters for cars and other vehicles. Anglo American is the world’s largest producer of this metal, contributing 40% of the total supply. Logically, when a company is quite concentrated around one product (or in this case one metal), its business can be overly impacted by it. So when the price of palladium dropped 10% last week to $1,048 per oz, it was always going to hurt. This move lower was also seen in other precious metals, including gold. This drop also ties into another reason why the Anglo American share price fell last week. There are increasing concerns around rising inflation in both the US and the UK. A knock-on reaction to this would be for central banks to raise interest rates. Since gold and other precious metals don’t pay any interest, these lose their shine for investors, and usually drop in price. Another impact of higher interest rates will make it more expensive for Anglo American to refinance and issue new debt. The interest repayments will be higher than currently. In the 2020 results, it showed net debt of $5.6bn. Although this isn’t out of control, it’s still a significant number. A dip in Anglo American shares worth buying Another issue that was flagged up last week was a lack of controls and excessive risk at a mine in Australia. Last May, a mining blast injured five workers. An inquest now released showed that the company failed to manage dangerous gases in the area for months before the issue happened. Anglo American has said that it is putting more money into safety initiatives as a result. This event is bad PR for the business, and therefore is a contributor to the share price falling last week. Despite the above issues, I don’t think the 12% fall last week will be a catalyst for a much deeper drop in the Anglo American share price. I think that the precious metals market should stabilise after the inflation shock has been fully processed. I also think the mining issue in Australia will be addressed and can be resolved. The business is fundamentally sound and profitable. The share price is still up over 51% over one year, despite the drop last week. So on balance I would consider buying the stock now on this dip. The post 3 reasons why the Anglo American share price dropped 12% last week appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues Looking for new share ideas? Grab this FREE report now. Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits. From 2015-2019… Revenues increased 38.6%. Its net income went up 19.7 times! Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLED The opportunity here really is astounding. In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer? You could have the full details on this company right now. Grab your free report – while it’s online. More reading Potential takeover alert! Should I buy Morrisons shares? EV stocks: why I won’t be buying any in 2021 Stock market crash! Here’s what I’d do if the FTSE 100 falls 20% UK investors are buying Sareum Holdings. Should I? Will the Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust share price keep rising? jonathansmith1 has no position in any company mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  2. London Markets: Anglo American’s coal spinoff slumps in London debut (07/06/2021 - Market Watch)
    Anglo American's thermal coal mining spinoff, Thungela Resources, is named after the isiZulu word for "to ignite," but it did the exact opposite in its trading debut on the London Stock Exchange.
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  3. Should I buy Anglo American shares? (22/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    I’ve been busy this week. I have already dealt with Open Orphan, one of my portfolio holdings, and its plans for a demerger. Today I am dealing with another. Anglo American (LSE:AAL) wants shareholder approval to spin-off its thermal coal operations in South Africa into a new holding company, Thungela Resources. If shareholders, like me, back the move, they will get one Thungela share for every 10 Anglo shares they own. At least 75% of shareholders need to approve the demerger at the annual general meeting on 5 May 2021.  I suspect the motion will be passed. The 3% rise in the Anglo American share price after the announcement suggests investors in Anglo approve of the move. Shareholder approval I will not be voting for the demerger, even though I suspect I will be on the losing side. I don’t want to own companies that are not moving towards a fossil fuel-free future. But, if the demerger is approved, I will end up holding shares in Thungela, a pure-play coal miner. What’s going to happen to the price of those shares when they start trading? I can’t see any mention of any lock-up period or restrictions, so I guess many investors are going to run for the exit immediately. If I rush for the exit, I am fairly confident I will be selling Thungela at a loss. I could wait and hope that a strategic buyer comes in to snap up Thungela at a heavily discounted price. But I don’t really want to do that. Now, I could be wrong about Thungela’s prospects. Other investors might want direct exposure to thermal coal as Anglo has suggested. But looking at the operating loss the thermal coal business made in 2020 and the climate change emergency the world is facing, I am not confident. Anglo could have made plans to dispose of Thungela by a split-off or a carve-out if they are as confident about investor interest in an independent coal company as they say. Anglo American share price As for the impact on the Anglo share price, I think an approved demerger will be positive. Being out of thermal coal will allow previously reluctant investors to buy in. Anglo will continue to mine copper, platinum group metals, nickel, manganese, iron, and diamonds. Some of these metals are critical to the green economy. All should see increased demand as the world gets back to normal after the pandemic. Mining is a cyclical industry. The outlook for metal prices looks positive now, but things will turn eventually. I am prepared to hold my Anglo shares through the cycles. According to the World Steel Association, the company will still produce coking coal for steel making, which produced 8% of global CO2 emissions. Also, there is the Woodsmith mine, which Anglo acquired in the Sirius Minerals takeover. It has the potential to produce quality fertiliser to help the world grow food. But, production won’t start until at least 2024. Until production starts, the project will continue to gobble up capital. Would I buy Anglo Shares? I won’t sell my Anglo shares, but I also won’t buy more right now. If the demerger is approved then buying now would give me more Thungela shares to dispose of. I will consider buying shares in a thermal coal-free Anglo. There’s a ‘double agent’ hiding in the FTSE… we recommend you buy it! Don’t miss our special stock presentation. It contains details of a UK-listed company our Motley Fool UK analysts are extremely enthusiastic about. They think it’s offering an incredible opportunity to grow your wealth over the long term – at its current price – regardless of what happens in the wider market. That’s why they’re referring to it as the FTSE’s ‘double agent’. Because they believe it’s working both with the market… And against it. To find out why we think you should add it to your portfolio today… Click here to get access to our presentation, and learn how to get the name of this 'double agent'! More reading Will the Anglo American share price keep rising in 2021? These 2 FTSE 100 stocks have doubled in a year! I’d still buy them Best stocks to buy now: I think these 2 FTSE 100 shares are too cheap I think these FTSE 100 stocks are 2 of the best shares to buy for my ISA James J. McCombie owns shares of Anglo American and Open Orphan plc. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Should I buy Anglo American shares? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  4. Anglo American beats on revenue (25/02/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  5. Anglo American Platinum Limited reports 1H results (26/07/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  6. Will the Anglo American share price keep rising in 2021? (19/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The Anglo American (LSE:AAL) share price has been a stellar performer over the last year. After being dealt a hefty blow in early 2020 due to internal and external operational disruptions, the stock price has since been on the rise. And it is now 125% higher than 12 months ago! What caused this impressive growth? And should I be adding this company to my portfolio? The rising Anglo American share price With many mining sites being temporarily shut down in the early days of the pandemic, a subsequent shortage of metals began. This is what appears to have triggered the start of the rising commodity prices. As manufacturing businesses slowly reopened their factories, demand built up. However, it quickly started accelerating as many countries worldwide initiated new infrastructure projects, especially within the energy sector. The limited supply combined with the rising demand naturally led to resource prices going up. This is fantastic news for Anglo American, which is a leading producer of copper, iron and platinum. And so it was able to achieve some pretty impressive results, in my opinion. And that was despite the fact the firm suffered a severe plant outage in its platinum production division. Looking at the full-year results for 2020, total revenue increased by $1bn, and underlying profits remained relatively flat. These are hardly groundbreaking results. But considering the reduced mining and production volumes, they’re not bad. At least, I think so. Since then, the business has begun executing plans to demerge from its South African coal operations and acquired Sirius Minerals to further diversify its portfolio. With operations now returning to pre-pandemic levels and metal demand on the rise, I believe the Anglo American and its share price can continue to thrive over the long term. And it seems the management team agrees as they recently increased the shareholder dividends. Risks to consider Rising commodity prices have undoubtedly been beneficial to the Anglo American share price. However, the value of metals can be volatile, as shown by the firm’s fluctuating level of profitability. Currently, the demand for metals like Iron and copper far exceeds the available supply. But this will not always be the case. With more mining companies returning to full operational capacity and additional mining sites being established, the market may eventually become saturated. As a consequence, metal prices could very quickly start falling again. And since the costs of mining remain relatively fixed, the level of Anglo American’s profitability could be significantly impacted. The bottom line With the world shifting towards electric vehicles and renewable energy, I believe the need for metals like platinum and copper isn’t going to disappear any time soon. Combining this with Anglo American’s diverse portfolio of materials makes me think the share price can continue to climb higher. Therefore, while there are some substantial risks, I would consider adding the business to my portfolio. But there is also another stock that caught my attention recently… The high-calibre small-cap stock flying under the City’s radar Adventurous investors like you won’t want to miss out on what could be a truly astonishing opportunity… You see, over the past three years, this AIM-listed company has been quietly powering ahead… rewarding its shareholders with generous share price growth thanks to a carefully orchestrated ‘buy and build’ strategy. And with a first-class management team at the helm, a proven, well-executed business model, plus market-leading positions in high-margin, niche products… our analysts believe there’s still plenty more potential growth in the pipeline. Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK investment team all hot-under-the-collar about this tiny £350+ million enterprise… inside a specially prepared free investment report. But here’s the really exciting part… right now, we believe many UK investors have quite simply never heard of this company before! Click here to claim your copy of this special investment report — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Small-Cap Stock… free of charge! More reading These 2 FTSE 100 stocks have doubled in a year! I’d still buy them Best stocks to buy now: I think these 2 FTSE 100 shares are too cheap I think these FTSE 100 stocks are 2 of the best shares to buy for my ISA Zaven Boyrazian does not own shares in Anglo American. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Will the Anglo American share price keep rising in 2021? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  7. Anglo American Q2 production gains led by diamonds, platinum metals (20/07/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  8. Anglo American shares: should I buy as copper prices rise? (06/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Anglo American (LSE:AAL) is a FTSE 100 company and a big producer of copper, two things I see as potentially making it a buy for me. So is this stock a great way for me to capitalise on copper’s price increase in the years to come? So far this year, the price of copper has risen by 30% and it’s now at a 10-year high. This is being fuelled by shortages due to growing demand and under-investment in developing the supply. That isn’t all, there are expectations that demand for the metal is set to continue rising in the short term as economies open up post-pandemic. With copper being a key component in electric motors and batteries, there’s potential for this to be a long-term trend as the adoption of electric cars expands. This has some analysts predicting the price could double in the next three years. All of these factors mean that I’m looking to potentially piggyback on the coat-tails of copper’s rise over the coming years. And I think Anglo American shares could be a strategic long-term way to achieve this. Anglo American’s copper position The good news here is that Anglo American just revealed in its Q1 financials that its copper production jumped 9% year-on-year. The company has also been investing in its Quellaveco mine in Peru. This is a large-scale copper mining project that’s expected to begin production next year. It’s not all positive for the company’s mines, however, with a severe drought in Chile impacting production at its Los Bronces site. This could be a longer-term challenge for Anglo American, not least because it has resulted in clashes between the local community and the company over the use of water. Commodities boom Wider than copper, Anglo American is also well-positioned in platinum, iron ore, and diamonds, among other commodities. I think this is positive for potential holders of Anglo American shares. That’s because the prices of such commodities are broadly rising. From the commodities noted, platinum also experiencing a huge increase in price in recent years. That said, on the diamond front, the company saw production fall by 7% year-on-year. Yet with commodities, there are risks to bear in mind linked to their cyclicality. This means prices can rise higher for periods of time, over a period of years. But this can be followed by a subsequent drop with prices remaining low for years at a time. It makes ownership of shares in related companies potentially riskier than in some other industries. Coal demerger On the plus side, today the company announced at a shareholder meeting that its coal demerger had been passed. This should allow it to move away from this heavily polluting commodity and focus more on copper demand. The development could see Anglo American shares rise more closely in relation to potential copper price increases. However, this also means that the business loses some of its diversity. And a cause of uncertainty is that CEO Mark Cutifani will step down once the Quellaveco mine is completed. So to repeat my original question: should I buy? At present, I’ll wait to see how the market reacts to the demerger news over the coming weeks and look to buy Anglo American shares should the price dip from its current high mark. A Top Share with Enormous Growth Potential Savvy investors like you won’t want to miss out on this timely opportunity… Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK analyst all fired up about this ‘pure-play’ online business (yes, despite the pandemic!). Not only does this company enjoy a dominant market-leading position… But its capital-light, highly scalable business model has previously helped it deliver consistently high sales, astounding near-70% margins, and rising shareholder returns … in fact, in 2019 it returned a whopping £150m+ to shareholders in dividends and buybacks! And here’s the really exciting part… While COVID-19 may have thrown the company a curveball, management have acted swiftly to ensure this business is as well placed as it can be to ride out the current period of uncertainty… in fact, our analyst believes it should come roaring back to life, just as soon as normal economic activity resumes. That’s why we think now could be the perfect time for you to start building your own stake in this exceptional business – especially given the shares look to be trading on a fairly undemanding valuation for the year to March 2021. Click here to claim your copy of this special report now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Growth Share… free of charge! More reading Should I buy Anglo American shares? Will the Anglo American share price keep rising in 2021? These 2 FTSE 100 stocks have doubled in a year! I’d still buy them Ben Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Anglo American shares: should I buy as copper prices rise? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  9. I think these FTSE 100 stocks are 2 of the best shares to buy for my ISA (26/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Commodity stocks now look like some of the best shares to buy for long-term income and growth. FTSE 100-listed mining companies have been booming lately, yet there could be more to come when the post-Covid-19 recovery takes off. Commodity stocks are leading the FTSE 100 today, with Glencore (LSE: GLEN) up 3.8% and Anglo American (LSE: AAL) rising 3.1%. Of course, one day’s growth proves nothing. What matters is what happens over 10 or 20 years or longer. That’s my investment time scale. Over such a lengthy term, I expect both Glencore and Anglo American to be among the best shares to buy for both share price growth and dividend income. Recent performance has been astonishing. Both stocks have doubled over the last year, despite the pandemic. Investors have been positioning themselves for the recovery, ever since last November’s vaccine breakthrough. China remains the prime source of demand for metals and minerals, and its economy is recovering fastest. The shift towards electric cars is also driving demand for iron ore and copper, the latter of which has just hit a 10-year high of more than $9,000 a tonne. I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks Despite recent strong share price growth, Glencore and Anglo American continue to look cheap today. Glencore trades at 10.6 times forecast earnings, while Anglo American trades at just 7 times earnings. From the valuation point of view, these look like some of the best shares to buy today. This is pricing in a lot of growth over the next year, though. If the recovery flounders and commodity demand slumps, both stocks could disappoint. The sector is famously cyclical, and we need further evidence of a global rebound for them to climb higher. Right now, this is in the balance, due to vaccine delays and mutant Covid strains. Personally, I remain optimistic. Even if lockdowns drag on, I think Glencore and Anglo American will fly in the longer run. My lengthy investment timeframe gives them plenty of opportunity to do so. As well as growth, these are attractive income stocks. Glencore recently resumed dividends and is now forecast to yield 4.1%, covered 2.3 times by earnings. Anglo American looks like one of the best shares to buy for income across the entire FTSE 100, with a forecast yield of 5.5% and cover of 2.5. Two of the best shares to buy The pandemic has taken its toll, of course. Glencore has seen revenues drop by a third but it has also cut net debt below $13bn, and is even considering a share buyback later this year. Anglo American has been hit by by falling diamond sales, Covid-19 lockdowns in South Africa, and operational problems in its coal and platinum divisions. Despite that, profits have been better than expected and it has lifted its dividend. Investing in the commodity sector can be very up and down, but I still think it contains some of the best shares to buy for income and growth. Glencore and Anglo American look like top ‘buy and hold’ stocks for my Stocks and Shares ISA allowance. I also like this one. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading 2 shares I’m adding to my Stocks and Shares ISA before the April deadline Harvey Jones has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post I think these FTSE 100 stocks are 2 of the best shares to buy for my ISA appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  10. Anglo American's Kumba Iron Ore full-year profit surges (23/02/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  11. Anglo American to spin off South African thermal coal assets (08/04/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  12. Anglo American diamond sales down as COVID cuts demand from India (19/05/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  13. Anglo American lifts Q1 output on copper, PGM strength; cuts coal guidance (22/04/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  14. The Rightmove share price doesn’t tempt me. I’d rather buy this FTSE 100 stock (26/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The Rightmove (LSE: RMV) share price has stumped during the pandemic, even while the UK property market has been going gangbusters. It has fallen 3.5% this morning at the time of writing, after reporting a 29% drop in full-year revenue to £205.7m. This was largely down to the FTSE 100-listed property portal giving estate agency and housebuilding customers discounts to see them through April to September last year. Operating profits fell 37% to £135.1m, with margins shrinking from 74% in 2019 to 66% in 2020. The Rightmove share price is still up an impressive 54% over five years, but the future looks bumpy and the stock is expensive. Property up, portal down Rightmove’s generous share buybacks totalled £148.8m but were put on pause in the pandemic, and investors got just £30.1m in 2020. On the plus side, they will resume next month. The dividend is already back, with a final payout of 4.5p. Customers have been loyal, with membership down just 3%. The site still boasts more than one million UK residential properties, up 100,000 on last year, more than any other portal. The Rightmove share price could get a boost if Chancellor Rishi Sunak extends the stamp duty holiday in next week’s Budget as most people expect, which should delay or prevent a sharp housing market slowdown. Management no doubt made the right decision by giving customers discounts to keep them sweet, and will hopefully be rewarded if and when normality returns. However, I think the Rightmove share price will come under added pressure if employment rises sharply after furlough. With the stock trading at 32.3 times forecast earnings, it looks too expensive for me. Commodity supercycle dawns Right now, I would prefer to buy a company with stronger growth and income prospects, and there seem to be plenty around in the mining sector. The Anglo American (LSE: AAL) share price jumped 3.94% yesterday after it posted better-than-expected full-year profits and hiked its dividend. EBITDA earnings did fall 2% to $9.8bn, but that was better than the $9.4bn total that investors had anticipated. Other numbers were even more positive. Anglo American lifted the final dividend 53% to 72p a share, while rising commodity prices generated enough cash to pay down $2bn off its net debt, reducing the total to $5.6bn. The De Beers owner recovered from falling diamond sales in the first half, with consumer demand for jewellery improving in China, and even the US. Iron ore and copper demand is strong. Rightmove share price doesn’t tempt me If the global economy explodes out of lockdown and we enjoy another ‘roaring twenties’, this £38bn mining giant could benefit. That is a big if, of course. If today’s lockdowns are extended due to mutant Covid variants, demand could slump. My other worry is that the Anglo American share price has flown so high that it will be hard to maintain the momentum. It is now up an incredible 599% over five years, and 46% over 12 months. Yet it trades at just 8.2 times forecast earnings. That tempts me far more than today’s fragile Rightmove share price. This also tempts me. One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading A FTSE 100 share I’d buy and hold for the next 10 years I think these are 3 of the best stocks to buy now for passive income Stock investing: 3 of the best growth shares I’d buy right now Harvey Jones has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Rightmove. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Rightmove share price doesn’t tempt me. I’d rather buy this FTSE 100 stock appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  15. Best shares to buy now: 1 FTSE AIM stock I would buy with £500 (19/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    My best shares to buy now are spread among many industries and across a number of markets. One FTSE AIM stock I like is Anglo Asian Mining (LSE:AAZ). FTSE AIM opportunity Anglo Asian Mining is a gold, copper, and silver explorer and producer that operates in Azerbaijan. It is a minnow in a lucrative and saturated sector. It possesses a market cap of approximately £165m. When the market crash occurred last year, many investors turned towards commodities such as gold, which enjoyed strong performance. Gold was seen as a safe-haven asset to store value. Anglo was very much a penny stock five years ago and was trading for as low as 9p per share. As I write, I can pick up shares for close to 142p per share. That is an astonishing 3,450% share price increase for the FTSE AIM incumbent. It is worth noting too, that Anglo has comfortably surpassed its market crash low but has not quite reached its pre-cash highs. Its rise in share price and ability to grow is one of the reasons it is on my FTSE AIM best shares to buy now list. Why I like Anglo Asian Mining There are a few reasons I like Anglo. Firstly, it recently regained control of a mineral-rich area that was subject to a political dispute. Anglo announced that the end of a war between Azerbaijan and Armenia had seen one of its lucrative contracts restored. It also recently announced a five-year extension to one of its most lucrative contracts where it mines a lot of its materials. Next, Anglo has seen year-on-year growth in revenue, profit, and cash reserves. Full-year results announced a few months back also made for positive reading. These results showed record revenues of over $100m as well as cash generation of over $38m which meant Anglo was debt free. These aspects play an important part in me selecting my best shares to buy now. I refer to debt levels, growth, and share price activity to name a few criteria. Anglo has continued to pay dividends, which is another one of my key criteria. Many other FTSE firms have cancelled dividends to conserve cash. Anglo announced a special dividend at the end of January 2021 based on a record 2020. It already paid a dividend back in November 2020 too. Best shares to buy now carry risks too Firstly, Anglo is a rather small player. Although its rise to date is commendable, it can be out muscled and outmanoeuvred by larger firms out there. Secondly, it operates in a politically volatile part of the world. This could negatively affect operations and its balance sheet if things take a turn for the worse. Lastly, gold as a commodity long-term could be quite risky. Low interest rates have recently been helping its performance. A stock market rally could see investors become less risk averse and this could detract from gold’s standing as a safe-haven asset. There is a lot to like about Anglo. It is priced well in my opinion, it is debt-free, and reported record revenues and cash generation for its last full-year period. I expect its growth journey to continue. Looking at the best shares to buy now if I had a spare £500 ripe for investment, Anglo would be a strong contender. The high-calibre small-cap stock flying under the City’s radar Adventurous investors like you won’t want to miss out on what could be a truly astonishing opportunity… You see, over the past three years, this AIM-listed company has been quietly powering ahead… rewarding its shareholders with generous share price growth thanks to a carefully orchestrated ‘buy and build’ strategy. And with a first-class management team at the helm, a proven, well-executed business model, plus market-leading positions in high-margin, niche products… our analysts believe there’s still plenty more potential growth in the pipeline. Here’s your chance to discover exactly what has got our Motley Fool UK investment team all hot-under-the-collar about this tiny £350+ million enterprise… inside a specially prepared free investment report. But here’s the really exciting part… right now, we believe many UK investors have quite simply never heard of this company before! Click here to claim your copy of this special investment report — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top Small-Cap Stock… free of charge! More reading Funding Circle’s share price is soaring, but I’d buy Barclays now 3 reasons why I think the Tesco share price can rise Will Cineworld shares ever be worth buying? Coats Group’s share price soars as it upgrades earnings forecast The Dunelm share price has climbed 25% in 2021. Here’s what I’d do now Jabran Khan has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Best shares to buy now: 1 FTSE AIM stock I would buy with £500 appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  16. : Not just an American headache, as a ‘race for space’ sends U.K. house prices soaring (01/06/2021 - Market Watch)
    The “race for space” sent U.K. house prices soaring to their highest level in nearly seven years in May, as the COVID-19 pandemic encouraged people to move to larger properties in rural areas.
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  17. 2 FTSE 100 investments for a Stocks and Shares ISA (07/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The FTSE 100 has recently reached a post-pandemic high. However, despite this performance, I think it can head even higher. This is because many businesses in the lead index continue to look cheap compared to their potential.  With that in mind, here are two index champions I’d buy for my Stocks and Shares ISA today to capitalise on this trend.  FTSE 100 investments The first company I’d buy for my FTSE 100 ISA portfolio is Anglo American (LSE: AAL).  I believe this mining conglomerate is perfectly positioned to ride the global economic recovery over the next few years. According to the company’s latest trading update, production from its copper and iron ore mines increased 9% and 1% respectively for the third quarter of its financial year.  This is notable because the prices of both of these commodities have recently reached multi-year highs. Higher production and higher prices suggest Anglo could be on track to report a bumper trading performance this year.  Of course, the most considerable risk of investing in any commodity business is that prices can fall as fast as they rise. So, while the company might be profiting from rising prices today, that might not last. As such, there’s no guarantee Anglo will report bumper profits this year.  Still, I think this FTSE 100 blue-chip could be one of the best ways to invest in the global economic recovery, due to its exposure to crucial resources.  Stocks and Shares ISA buy  The second FTSE 100 stock I’d buy for my ISA right now is Informa (LSE: INF).  This company’s been hit hard by the pandemic. The business, which runs events including the China Beauty Expo and the Monaco Yacht Show, had to pull out all the stops last year when most large events were cancelled.  The largest exhibition group in the world has tried to shift events online, but this hasn’t stopped the bleeding. The FTSE 100 company swung to a £1.1bn pre-tax loss in 2020, compared to a profit of £318m the previous year. Most might shy away from investing in such a business at this time, but I’m optimistic. Management thinks the company will report sales of £1.7bn this year. Based on that projection, City analysts believe the group will earn a net income of £309m.  This is the baseline projection, and if the world’s post-coronavirus recovery accelerates, Informa could surpass this figure. I think it will. That’s why I’d buy the FTSE 100 stock today for my Stocks and Shares ISA.  Of course, there’s also a chance the company will have to revisit these figures if the pandemic drags on. In that case, I think earnings and sales would therefore disappoint, and the stock could fall in value. As such, Informa may not be suitable for all investors but, with a favourable tailwind, I think it could be a great FTSE 100 recovery play.  There’s a ‘double agent’ hiding in the FTSE… we recommend you buy it! Don’t miss our special stock presentation. It contains details of a UK-listed company our Motley Fool UK analysts are extremely enthusiastic about. They think it’s offering an incredible opportunity to grow your wealth over the long term – at its current price – regardless of what happens in the wider market. That’s why they’re referring to it as the FTSE’s ‘double agent’. Because they believe it’s working both with the market… And against it. To find out why we think you should add it to your portfolio today… Click here to get access to our presentation, and learn how to get the name of this 'double agent'! More reading Anglo American shares: should I buy as copper prices rise? Should I buy Anglo American shares? Is this one of the FTSE 100’s best shares to buy in 2021? Will the Anglo American share price keep rising in 2021? These 2 FTSE 100 stocks have doubled in a year! I’d still buy them Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post 2 FTSE 100 investments for a Stocks and Shares ISA appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  18. 1 FTSE 100 stock to buy and one to sell (11/07/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    I think there are plenty of attractive investments in the FTSE 100 at present. However, some companies appear more attractive than others, and some I would not buy at all.  As such, here is one FTSE 100 stock I would buy today and one I would sell straight away.  A FTSE 100 stock to sell I will start with the company I would sell first. This enterprise is Anglo American (LSE: AAL), the mining giant with operations worldwide.  I am pretty optimistic about the mining sector in general. Commodity prices are rising, and demand for essential commodities is increasing as the world starts to rebuild after the pandemic.  Some companies will undoubtedly benefit from this, and I think Anglo may also to a certain extent. But unlike some of its peers, such as BHP, which have a solid track record of allocating capital effectively and capitalising on rising resource prices, the FTSE 100 firm has a spotty record. This concerns me. I would rather own a miner such as BHP, which has more significant economies of scale and a better operational track record.  Commodity prices can be volatile, and there is no guarantee Anglo will be able to navigate the volatility with success. Therefore, I plan to avoid this stock and would sell it if I already owned it, despite the chance that it could benefit from any commodities boom.  Growth stock I believe the best FTSE 100 companies to own are those businesses with a strong brand and defined customer base. I think Prudential (LSE: PRU) ticks all these boxes. The Asia-focused financial services group’s brand is well known and trusted in its key markets. This provides the organisation with a competitive advantage to take on peers.  The rising wealth of the middle class across Asia could drive something of a financial renaissance across the region over the next few decades. The number of consumers with products like life insurance and pensions is relatively low compared to Western markets. This presents a considerable opportunity for Prudential. Using its brand, I think the group can grab market share from other companies in the sector and capitalise on the low penetration of financial products across the market.  That being said, the company is going up against deep-pocketed competitors, such as China’s state-owned banks. It may struggle to compete with these firms if they decide to attack its market share, considering their virtually limitless resources. At the same time, if the group loses its licence to operate, growth could come shuddering to a halt.  Despite these risks, I would buy the FTSE 100 stock for my portfolio today. As well as the reasons outlined above, the company is also one of only a few Asia-focused equities in the blue-chip index. That means it is one of the only ways investors can build exposure to Asia’s fast-growing economies. Considering the region’s growing economic importance, I want to have some exposure to it in my portfolio.  The post 1 FTSE 100 stock to buy and one to sell appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Our #1 North American Stock For The ‘New-Age Space Race’ Billionaires like Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and Mark Zuckerberg are already betting big money on the ‘new-age space race’, and for one very good reason… …because this is an industry that according to Morgan Stanley could be worth $1 TRILLION by 2040. But the problem is most of their investments are in private companies — meaning they’re largely off-limits for everyday investors. Fortunately, our team of analysts have identified one little-known company that’s at the cutting-edge of the space industry, and is currently trading at what looks like a VERY reasonable valuation… …for now. That’s why I want to urge you to check out our premium research on this top North American space stock ASAP. Simply click here to see find out how you can grab your copy today More reading 3 great starter stocks for new investors 3 reasons why the Anglo American share price dropped 12% last week Could its Asian focus boost the Prudential share price? UK shares to buy: 1 stock I’d acquire today Rupert Hargreaves has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Prudential. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  19. 2 shares I’m adding to my Stocks and Shares ISA before the April deadline (16/03/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    I find that the Stocks and Shares ISA deadline always comes around super quickly. At the start of the year, I think that it’s ages away. Then all of a sudden we’re in the middle of March, getting ready for Q2 and the ISA deadline. I’ve got plenty of my allocation left for this current ISA year, so I won’t be able to fill it all before the deadline. But with the spare cash I do have, I’m looking to add some shares in ahead of the looming 4 April deadline. A FTSE 100 stalwart The first stock I’m looking at adding to my Stocks and Shares ISA is Anglo American (LSE:AAL). The global mining company is a true giant, with a market capitalization of over £40bn.  I’ve written about the company a few times over the past six months, as the company has continued to deliver strong share price growth. It’s up 514% over a five-year period, and is one of the stocks I put in my example portfolio to show how I could turn £1,000 into £10,000. The strong growth has been helped by rising commodity prices. The copper price is up over 60% over five years. Aside from this is the high profit margin from mining. The 2020 results shows an impressive EBITDA margin of 43%.  It has also gained over the past couple of years thanks to the larger shift towards appealing to ESG investors. Anglo American’s commitment to a 30% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 is positive. The “Social Way” project of a fairer way to do business is also encouraging. I my opinion, the potential risk of adding Anglo American to my Stocks and Shares ISA comes from reputational issues. Late last year a lawsuit was filed in Zambia relating to alleged mass lead poisoning from the mines. Another issue is the constant health and safety risk, such as casualties from working in the mines. An income stock for my Stocks and Shares ISA The second company I’d look to add for my Stocks and Shares ISA is SSE (LSE:SSE). The well-known energy company services a lot of the UK and has done for several decades.  I think SSE shares are a good addition to my ISA for income generation. I’m not ruling out capital growth as well, but the stock has provided a dividend yield of above 5% for the past 10 years. The company operates in a competitive environment, but at the same time is one of only a handful of energy businesses dominating the market. As such, I don’t see SSE losing a lot of ground to new entrants due to the economies of scale. On the other hand, I don’t see the business growing exponentially in coming years either. SSE knows a lot of focus is on the dividend, and in the most recent trading update addressed this in just the second paragraph! This shows to me that it’s a priority for a lot of shareholders to know about the proposed dividend per share. One concern I have with energy companies like SSE is the impact of regulations with the likes of Ofgem. Last September, SSE was fined £2m for failing to publish needed documentation. Further fines and reputational damage could hurt the share price. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading UK stock investing: 2 shares I’d buy today for passive income The Rightmove share price doesn’t tempt me. I’d rather buy this FTSE 100 stock Stock market rally: I’d invest £2,000 today in these top UK shares A FTSE 100 share I’d buy and hold for the next 10 years I think these are 3 of the best stocks to buy now for passive income jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post 2 shares I’m adding to my Stocks and Shares ISA before the April deadline appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  20. Infographic: American Airlines (AAL) Q2 2021 performance (22/07/2021 - AlphaStreet)
    Aviation company American Airlines Group Inc. (NASDAQ: AAL) reported its financial results for the second quarter of 2021 today. Revenues totaled $7.4 billion compared to $1.6 billion in the same period a year ago. GAAP net profit was $19 million, or $0.03 per share, compared to a net loss of $2.06 billion, or $4.82 per share, last year. The adjusted loss per share was $1.69. “The story will be updated soon” The post Infographic: American Airlines (AAL) Q2 2021 performance first appeared on AlphaStreet.
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  21. These 2 FTSE 100 stocks have doubled in a year! I’d still buy them (16/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    FTSE 100 stocks aren’t all slow-growing, lumbering blue-chip giants. Sometimes their share prices can go gangbusters. Take London-listed global miners Anglo American (LSE: AAL) and Glencore (LSE: GLEN). They are up 132% and 125% respectively over the last year. That’s pretty punchy growth. But should I invest in them at today’s higher prices? The commodities and natural resources sector has been the year’s top performer, with an average return of 116%, according to the Association of Investment Companies. This sector is famously cyclical, and that remains the case today. In the previous two years, it posted negative returns. The danger with buying these two FTSE 100 stocks is that the big gains have been made. Mining stocks have been flying as investors anticipate a surge in demand once Covid vaccines do their work. They can also act as a hedge against inflation, as commodity prices tend to rise when prices generally are accelerating. Green light for commodity stocks US president Joe Biden’s $2trn infrastructure plan should boost demand for raw materials, while the 18.3% rise in Chinese GDP is a further positive sign. The green revolution should boost demand for copper, which is now trading near all-time highs. Anglo American should benefit from its broad portfolio of materials. It is the world’s largest producer of platinum, but also mines diamonds, copper, nickel, iron ore and metallurgical and thermal coal. That helped make it the best-performing FTSE 100 mining stock over five years, up 365% in that time, easily beating Glencore’s 91% five-year return. It has been generating plenty of cash, which has allowed it to pay off $2bn of net debt, reducing it to $5.6bn.  Anglo American aims to pay out 40% of profits to shareholders, and recently lifted its net dividend by 53% to 72 cents a share. Right now, it yields 2.32%, but that is forecast to rise. My major concern is that rivals Rio Tinto and BHP Group could now outperform, as they will benefit more from surging Chinese demand for iron ore and copper, key components for electric vehicles. Anglo American owns De Beers, but diamond sales have been falling. I’d buy these FTSE 100 stocks today Glencore also offers diversification, mining copper, cobalt, nickel, zinc and lead, aluminium, iron ore, gold and silver and crude oil. It has the largest exposure to base metals and copper of all the London-listed miners, totalling 40% of EBITDA earnings. The Glencore share price has been more volatile. Net debt hit $30bn in 2015, forcing it to shelve dividends, sell assets and raise fresh equity. It has now reduced that dizzying total to $15.84bn. That’s within its $10bn to $16bn target range, allowing it to resume its dividend. The yield is 2.66%. That should rise. My biggest concern is that these FTSE 100 stocks no longer look undervalued, trading at 17.2 and 27.9 times earnings respectively. If the recovery flounders, they will too. However, if they meet earnings expectations, all should be well as they trade at forward valuations of just 7.1 and 9.7 times earnings. I’d buy them today. This also tempts me. There’s a ‘double agent’ hiding in the FTSE… we recommend you buy it! Don’t miss our special stock presentation. It contains details of a UK-listed company our Motley Fool UK analysts are extremely enthusiastic about. They think it’s offering an incredible opportunity to grow your wealth over the long term – at its current price – regardless of what happens in the wider market. That’s why they’re referring to it as the FTSE’s ‘double agent’. Because they believe it’s working both with the market… And against it. To find out why we think you should add it to your portfolio today… Click here to get access to our presentation, and learn how to get the name of this 'double agent'! More reading 2 FTSE 100 stocks to buy with £2k The Glencore share price is rising: should I buy the stock now? Best stocks to buy now: I think these 2 FTSE 100 shares are too cheap I think these FTSE 100 stocks are 2 of the best shares to buy for my ISA 2 shares I’m adding to my Stocks and Shares ISA before the April deadline Harvey Jones has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post These 2 FTSE 100 stocks have doubled in a year! I’d still buy them appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  22. Alexion acquisition by Astrazeneca closing in (08/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    I was typing this post as a question, but since I have now solved the question while I had almost finished writing the post, I will share it anyway, as a news item. In December 2020 it was announced that Alexion ($ALXN) and Astrazeneca stroke a deal, where Astrazeneca would fully acquire Alexion. The deal is as follows: "Alexion shareholders will receive $60 in cash and 2.1243 AstraZeneca American Depositary Shares (ADSs) (each ADS representing one-half of one (1/2) ordinary share of AstraZeneca, as evidenced by American Depositary Receipts (ADRs)) for each Alexion share. Based on AstraZeneca's reference average ADR price of $54.14, this implies total consideration to Alexion shareholders of $39bn or $175 per share. The boards of directors of both companies have unanimously approved the acquisition. Subject to receipt of regulatory clearances and approval by shareholders of both companies, the acquisition is expected to close in Q3 2021, and upon completion, Alexion shareholders will own c.15% of the combined company." At the time of the announcement, the share price of $ALXN shot from $120 to $156. In April 2021 the US gave clearance to the deal. On May 11 2021, shareholders of Alexion approved the acquisition, and this week the EU approved the buyout. The Alexion shareholders now have the option to receive the stock value by receiving either 2.1243 shares of Astrazeneca -ADR- traded at the NASDAQ, or by receiving 1.06215 ordinary shares of Astrazeneca traded at the LSE. Regardless of this choice, the acquired stock value at Astrazeneca's currently traded price is about $125, totalling the deal at circa $185 per share, slightly above the currently traded price of $182.   submitted by   /u/Piddoxou [link]   [comments]
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  23. Why is the British American Tobacco share price down this week? (23/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    British American Tobacco (LSE:BATS) describes itself as the world’s most international tobacco group, operating in more countries than any other firm. This week has seen the British American Tobacco share price dip over 6% since trading opened on Monday morning. I would argue the FTSE 100 incumbent is a profit-generating, juicy dividend yielding stock. So why has its share price dipped? And with this dip, do I see it as an opportunity at a more attractive price point? British American Tobacco share price slumps When the markets opened on Monday morning I could buy shares in British American Tobacco for close to 2,900p per share. As I write this on a Friday afternoon, shares are trading for 2,705p per share. That’s a 6% drop in the week. In my opinion that is a sizeable change for an established FTSE 100 firm such as BATS. Looking back further, approximately four years ago, the British American Tobacco share price was nearly 50% higher than current levels. So it is fair to say the price has been declining for some time. Potential risks affect share price The recent dip in the British American Tobacco price has been caused by reports emerging from the US about possible new restrictions on nicotine levels in cigarettes. The US market is one of BATS’ most profitable markets. Neither the US government nor the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have commented on the report. Nor is there a guarantee this restriction will come into effect. Despite this, an over 6% slump in share price is definitely newsworthy in my opinion. It has also made me pay attention to see if I could benefit from this lower price point. Regulation and restrictions are a constant threat to tobacco companies. When they rear their head, share prices can tumble. Nicotine is an addictive substance that creates more demand for a smoking product. If any restrictions came into place, profits would surely be affected. It is worth noting that British American Tobacco’s FTSE 100 peer, Imperial Brands, has also suffered a dip in price this week too. Something similar occurred in 2017 when the FDA attempted to introduce restrictions then too. There have been other challenges in the past and although the British American Tobacco share price may react negatively, as a company, it continues to generate healthy profits. FTSE 100 opportunity? Overall, I believe the British American Tobacco share price is a potential FTSE 100 opportunity albeit with some risks. Profits at BATS have increased nearly 50% between 2015 and 2020 from £4.3bn to £6.4bn. It has a juicy dividend yield of just under 8% too. Granted, this is not guaranteed and could change if profits are affected. I do believe the tobacco industry is always at risk of changes in regulation and new restrictions. It is also a known fact that the number of smokers across the world is declining therefore the number of cigarettes is also in decline. These are things I must consider. Away from the FTSE 100, this tech stock has had a rollercoaster few months since its IPO but is it an opportunity to get in at a cheap price just now? FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading British American Tobacco and Imperial Brands: which one would I buy? The British American Tobacco share price slumps! Should I buy the stock? UK shares to buy now: 2 FTSE 100 stocks I own 2 leading UK shares I would buy today – at last year’s price UK shares to buy now: 3 I think can double my money in 3 years Jabran Khan has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Why is the British American Tobacco share price down this week? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  24. Buy shares across the Atlantic (31/03/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    There seems to be not only a rotation from growth to value stocks at the moment, but also one across the Atlantic. The DAX has again reached a high of 15000 points today. German shares are in contrast to American still relatively cheap. Also, unlike the U.S., there is no need to fear inflation in the euro area (the ECB could never raise interest rates here in the next five years) because the economy here is not yet running at full speed. An example of this would be that the Volkswagen share has risen sharply in recent weeks, mainly due to higher interest from American investors. Also, an American would have earned a 10% return last year just from currency effects if they had held European stocks. So my question therefore to the Americans among you: Do you have your eye on European stocks? Can you trade them? There are definitely interesting companies in Europe that you can still buy at a reasonable price. And for us Europeans it is quite natural to look around the US market (probably more than in Europe).   submitted by   /u/GordonGekkoVienna [link]   [comments]
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  25. The IAG share price soars 37% in 3 months. Can it go higher? (05/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    So far, 2021 has been very good to shareholders in International Consolidated Airlines Group (LSE: IAG). The IAG share price has soared like a jumbo jet in 2021, delivering bumper returns for its owners. But how much further can this flight continue? The IAG share price collapsed in 2020 At its five-year peak, the IAG share price hovered around £5 in late-June 2018. Although that was less than three years ago, it must feel a lifetime away to IAG shareholders. However, even as late as mid- January 2020, the shares were trading around 460p. Then, as Covid-19 infections swept the globe, the Anglo-Spanish airline’s stock came crashing to earth. Over the next nine months, the IAG share price was almost in permanent free-fall. On 25 September 2020, it plunged to an intra-day low of just 86.54p, before closing at 94.64p. Alas, by 29 September, it had slumped to a new closing low of 91p. The owner of British Airways, Iberia, and Aer Lingus appeared to be on its knees. But good news was just around the corner… Airline stocks soar since Halloween In early November, the light at the end of the tunnel for IAG shareholders finally arrived. The unveiling of several highly effective Covid-19 vaccines sent bombed-out stocks skyrocketing. In the six months since then, the UK shares that have gained most have largely been ‘value’ and ‘recovery’ stocks. And, given its horror-show performance in 2020, it’s no surprise that the IAG share price has been one of the biggest winners of the past half-year. As I write, the IAG share price hovers around 202p, valuing the group at £10.1bn. That more than doubled 2020’s closing low of 91p, for a gain of 122% in just over seven months. It’s also more than a quarter (26.4%) above the 159.8p at which the shares closed 2020. Here’s how the stock has risen over three recent timescales: 3M 36.9% 6M 95.9% 1Y 50.7% As you can see, the IAG share price is up more than a third (36.9%) in the past three months. For the record, this makes it the best performing share in the FTSE 100 index since 5 February. Unfortunately, over longer periods, the stock has been a washout. Over two years and three years, it has almost halved (down 42.7% and 52.1%), and has crashed two-fifths (-40.1%) over five years. After a disastrous 2020, IAG is a prime recovery candidate In 2019, IAG’s revenues hit a record €25.5bn. With airmiles flown collapsing in 2020, yearly revenues plunged to €7.8bn. As a result, net profit reversed from €1.7bn in 2019 to a loss of €6.9bn for 2020. Last year, the group flew 31.3m passengers, 87m fewer than 2019’s 118.3m. To get back to those highs, the number of passengers will have to quadruple from 2020’s rock bottom. Likewise, for the IAG share price to return to former glories, air travel will need to recover to pre-Covid-19 levels. Do I think there’s room for the IAG share price to go higher on good news? You bet I do. After all, it hit 222.1p on 16 March, its intra-day high for 2021. But would I buy the stock at current levels? Maybe, but like this Foolish colleague, I’m uneasy. I’m an old-school value hunter, so I tend to leave growth and recovery stocks for other investors. But I do believe that if a global economic boom does take hold, then IAG could be a big winner from any sustained rebound! One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading Where will the IAG share price go next? The IAG share price is up 20% in 2021. Have I missed my chance? Why I like the easyJet, IAG, and Wizz Air shares now As the IAG share price continues to rise, here’s why I’d invest £3k in the airline The International Airlines Group (IAG) share price has been rising. Should I buy the stock now? Cliffdarcy has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The IAG share price soars 37% in 3 months. Can it go higher? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  26. After Hours Spike on OPEN (02/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Did anyone else notice the two/three orders at 4:40ET and 5:57ET yesterday afternoon on OPEN? Each of them were large enough to send the share price soaring to $17.20 a little over an hour apart. Is it a glitch or is there something to that? Possibly related to Q2 wrapping up and financial review? Or, you can just tell me that I’m crazy…   submitted by   /u/chickadichina [link]   [comments]
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  27. Is the British American Tobacco (BATS) share price too cheap? (27/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The British American Tobacco (LSE:BATS) share price had a bit of a rough journey throughout 2020. Overall, it fell by 20% last year, despite operating profits actually increasing. And while the stock has since moved up slightly, it’s still trading firmly below pre-pandemic levels. So, is this a buying opportunity for my portfolio? The falling British American Tobacco share price In 2020 there were rightful concerns about the firm’s ability to continue selling its tobacco-based products when consumer spending was falling rapidly. Fortunately, these fears proved to be unfounded. Why? Because British American Tobacco’s products are pretty popular with its customers. And so overall revenue in 2020 remained basically flat. But due to operational efficiency improvements, margins increased, leading to a 10.5% rise in underlying profits. This is undoubtedly good news. And is why the management team was able to increase shareholder dividends last year. By contrast, most other businesses were either cutting. or outright cancelling, them. So why’s the BATS share price still slumping? Last week, a report came out indicating the Biden administration is exploring the potential introduction of nicotine level restrictions in cigarettes. The motive behind this move is to further protect the health of smokers. But given that nicotine is what makes cigarettes so popular, it isn’t good news for companies like British American Tobacco. So far, the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA), who regulates these products, hasn’t made any comments regarding the report. And it’s entirely possible these new restrictions won’t come into effect. But the uncertainty appears to be negatively impacting the BATS share price, for now. Looking to the future I believe tobacco-based products will always face a strict regulatory environment that’ll continue to pose a threat in the future. However, the management team has fully acknowledged this risk and has since begun to diversify its portfolio of products. The firm is already seeing a rise in popularity of alternatives to cigarettes, such as vaping devices. It’s even started investing some of its capital into the cannabis sector. As it stands, these alternative products contribute very little to the top line. But the management team is expecting them to represent around 20% of the revenue stream by 2025. The bottom line Seeing a company adapt to changing consumer habits is always a good sign, in my eyes. However, its alternative products are still surrounded by tight regulation at this stage, especially its foray into the cannabis sector. As it stands, the substance remains illegal for non-medical uses in both the UK and most States in the US. The decriminalisation of marijuana will be an essential requirement to succeed within this space. And while there are expectations of this happening, it’s currently unclear when that might be. Having said that, based on the current performance and the BATS share price, the 7.8% dividend yield looks very attractive, as well as maintainable. And so, personally, I think this is a buying opportunity for my income portfolio, despite the risks. But I’ve also spotted another business that has far greater promise… One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading Why is the British American Tobacco share price down this week? British American Tobacco and Imperial Brands: which one would I buy? The British American Tobacco share price slumps! Should I buy the stock? UK shares to buy now: 2 FTSE 100 stocks I own Zaven Boyrazian does not own shares in British American Tobacco. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Is the British American Tobacco (BATS) share price too cheap? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  28. The Lloyds share price is soaring. What should I do now? (19/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    As a long-suffering Lloyds Banking Group (LSE: LLOY) shareholder, I’ve waited a long time to write a headline like that. But the Lloyds share price is up 30% so far in 2021, and it’s doubled since September 2020. So I think that’s a fair way to describe it. But the price is still only around half what I paid. And over the past five years, Lloyds shares are down 32%. So what should I do now? Buying in September would have been perfect. But hindsight is always great, isn’t it? I don’t want to tempt fate, but it does look like we’re finally emerging from the Covid-19 crisis. After a year of slump, the UK economy is turning back in the right direction. And the near-universal fear of financial stocks looks like it could finally be ending. Lloyds share price future But first I want to sound a few notes of caution. Headlines proclaiming “UK economy set to climb in 2021” are best treated warily, I think. Like those stock market screamers that go “Fifty billion knocked off the value of UK shares,” they lose all meaning without the wider context. If a man falls off a cliff, survives, and starts climbing back up again, he’s doing relatively well. But he’s not conquering Everest. I do, however, see longer term reasons to be optimistic about the Lloyds share price. In the early days of the pandemic, the PRA insisted that the banks withhold dividend payments. Maintaining liquidity is a good idea. But I can’t help feeling the mandating of it by the PRA helped to foster a banking-crisis mentality. In general, that kind of intervention in a free market does not please investors. And the Lloyds share price crash was surely worse because of it. Still, as we now know, the PRA’s fears did not come to pass. Lloyds has announced a dividend of 0.57p, which will be paid on 25 May. That’s not much, but it’s all the PRA’s restrictions will currently allow. I think Lloyds will want to get back to making its own dividend decisions as soon as possible. Reasons to be cheerful As fellow Motley Fool writer Cliff D’Arcy has pointed out, there are other bullish factors that could drive the Lloyds share price. Bad debts haven’t been as bad as feared, which could free up some of the cash Lloyds has set aside. There hasn’t been a housing crash, and the banks aren’t facing hordes of mortgage defaulters. There’s still a risk that the current economic cheer might prove over-enthusiastic. In fact, I think it probably is. We don’t know how the UK will fare post-Covid-19 and post-Brexit. And Covid-19 hasn’t gone away. But I’m optimistic that my Lloyds dividends will be back to respectable levels before much longer. And I hope that will drive the Lloyds share price up further. 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50 Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic… And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains. But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times. Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down… You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm. That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away. Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! More reading The Lloyds share price has doubled since September. Can it keep going? 5 reasons I think Lloyds share price can touch 60p The Lloyds share price is up 60% in a year! And I still think it’s good value Will the Lloyds share price hit 60p this year? Is the Lloyds share price cheap enough for me to buy the stock? Alan Oscroft owns shares of Lloyds Banking Group. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Lloyds Banking Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Lloyds share price is soaring. What should I do now? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  29. Personal Finance Daily: Here’s when American families will finally get their Child Tax Credit money and home-builder confidence remains strong, but buyers should expect rising prices (17/05/2021 - Market Watch)

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  30. These are the 5 top FTSE 100 shares over 5 years. I like 3 today (12/06/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The FTSE 100, the UK’s main stock market index, has ridden a rocky road over the past five years. In mid-June 2016, prior to the UK’s Brexit referendum, the blue-chip index hovered around 6,000 points. In both January and May 2018, it surged above 7,775 points, hitting an all-time closing high of 7,877.45 on 22 May 2018. So far, so good. The FTSE 100 crashes 35% The index then drifted up and down until 17 January 2020, when it closed at nearly 7,675 points. But then catastrophe arrived as the Covid-19 virus spread. As global infections rose, the Footsie crashed spectacularly, plunging to close at 4,993.89 on ‘Meltdown Monday’ (23 March 2020). The index lost over 2,680 points in two months, collapsing more than a third (34.9%). However, in the subsequent 16 months, the index recovered much of its losses and currently trades around 7,139.55 points. That’s a capital gain of almost a fifth (18.6%) over the past half-decade. These are the Footsie’s top five shares since 2016 As an index, the FTSE 100 tells you nothing about the performance of its individual constituents. As you’d expect, some Footsie shares have done extremely well, whereas others have performed terribly since mid-2016. For the record, these five shares are the top performers in the FTSE 100 over the five years to today: Ticker Company 1W 1M 3M 6M 1Y 2Y 3Y 5Y OCDO Ocado Group 3.9 -1.5 -10.0 -12.0 -8.7 63.0 90.0 634.9 AHT Ashtead Group -2.6 7.1 20.6 55.0 102.1 159.9 113.4 416.9 EVR Evraz -3.4 -8.7 8.4 38.2 105.3 -4.0 24.8 372.1 SMT Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust 1.6 13.1 5.1 8.9 64.5 135.4 132.5 371.2 AAL Anglo American -3.2 -8.7 3.7 23.9 65.9 54.2 67.6 365.4 As you can see, the #1 performer in the FTSE 100 over the past five years is online supermarket Ocado. Its shares have skyrocketed by nearly 635%, turning £1,000 into £7,349 since mid-2016. That is a fantastic return, easily eclipsing the 18.6% rise in the wider index. But it’s possible that Ocado stock has gone too far too fast and is now over-cooked. Hence, I’m not a fan of this superstar growth stock today, so I don’t own this share. Four five-star FTSE 100 stocks The second-best performer is Ashtead Group, which rents out industrial equipment and has had a cracking five years. Its share price is up over seven of the eight time periods shown, only to dip 2.6% this week. This consistent winner releases its latest quarterly results next Tuesday, 15 June. I’d like to see these before forming an opinion on the merits of this five-star FTSE 100 share. I don’t own this stock today. The third winner is Evraz, a FTSE 100 steelmaker and miner mainly operating in Russia, Ukraine, and North America. Its biggest shareholder is Roman Abramovich, owner of Premier League football team Chelsea. I like the look of this £9.1bn firm, not least for its 5.7% dividend yield, but have not yet pressed the buy button so far. Number four is SMT, a FTSE 100 investment trust with heavy exposure to US and Chinese tech stocks. I regard SMT as a bubble stock built on bubble stocks. Its shares have fallen from a peak of 1,415p four months ago to 1,241p today. As a value investor seeking high dividends, SMT just isn’t for me. Finally, in fifth place is Anglo American, which mines platinum, copper, nickel, iron ore, coal, and diamonds. Even though this stock is up 78% in the past 12 months, I have high hopes for global miners in any sustained post-Covid-19 boom. Hence, though I’d don’t own AAL, I would be a buyer at the current share price of 3,151p. The post These are the 5 top FTSE 100 shares over 5 years. I like 3 today appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Our 5 Top Shares for the New “Green Industrial Revolution" It was released in November 2020, and make no mistake: It’s happening. The UK Government’s 10-point plan for a new “Green Industrial Revolution.” PriceWaterhouse Coopers believes this trend will cost £400billion… …That’s just here in Britain over the next 10 years. Worldwide, the Green Industrial Revolution could be worth TRILLIONS. It’s why I’m urging all investors to read this special presentation carefully, and learn how you can uncover the 5 companies that we believe are poised to profit from this gargantuan trend ahead! Access this special "Green Industrial Revolution" presentation now More reading 3 UK shares to buy 3 top high-yield British stocks Should I buy Lloyds shares? 3 winning FTSE 100 shares to buy today The UK economy is growing fast. I’d buy these 3 FTSE 100 stocks now Cliffdarcy has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Ocado Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  31. CCL and American Airlines (17/07/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    So I got a promotional email today from American promoting “cruising is back!” They listed promotions with three cruise lines but NOT CCL. What to make of this?! CCL seems to have bottomed out around the $20 range. I failed to sell at $31 so now I’m cost averaging down from my price of $25.50.   submitted by   /u/Vermicious-Knid- [link]   [comments]
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  32. Just trying to learn how calls work.. (10/03/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    Just been reading into it recently, wanting to understand them before I do anything stupid. Basically what I understand, by way of example (Again, I'm citing what I understand, and am asking for help where I'm wrong: James buys a call for 100 XYZ stock @ $10 each for $1k, and he sets the strike price to $20/share by next month. Three potential situations can follow: The stock price goes up to $20 each in just 3 days; James exercises the call out of fear it won't get any higher and drop to below $10, and receives 100 XYZ stock, now worth double his investment, for half the price. James wins. The stock price goes up to $25/share. James exercises, and gets $15/share extra value, receiving 100 XYZ worth 2500 for a $10/share price. The stock price reaches only $18/share (or dips to $5/share) before the expiration date, and since in either case the strike price is not reached, the option expires worthless. James has lost $1k, and receives no stock. Or does it go like this? XYZ is worth $10. James makes a call, buying the right to 100 XYZ at the assumption they will reach $20 by expiration. He pays $2k for this call. This has two possible outcomes: The price goes up to $25+/share, into the money. James exercises, and receives 100 shares for the $20 price tag, but receives an extra $5+/share value. The price does not meet the $20/share strike price. James loses the $2k and receives no stock. If one or neither of these is correct, I'd really appreciate guidance. Thank you!!   submitted by   /u/ninthtale [link]   [comments]
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  33. Why is the FTSE 100 down today? (08/07/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The FTSE 100 is down today. As I write this, the index is down 1.34% or about 100 points. Today’s fall adds to what has already been a volatile week for the FTSE 100. Here’s what I think has rattled stock markets and what it means going forward. FTSE 100 falling When I see the FTSE 100 is down, I check what other indexes are doing. Today, across Asia and Europe, from Japan’s Nikkei 225 to the German Dax 30, there is a sea of red. All the major indexes are down today, not just the FTSE 100. So, whatever has knocked the FTSE 100, it is probably not specific to the UK. The US S&P 500 closed in the green yesterday. That suggests that something happened after the US market closed, and that has spread across the globe with the sun and will drag the S&P 500 down when it opens later today. The biggest FTSE 100 fallers include Anglo American, Glencore, and Persimmon at the time of writing. That’s two miners and one housebuilder. These are cyclical stocks that respond to changes in the economy. They are also more likely to be called value stocks rather than growth ones. Indeed, if I look at the FTSE Techmark 100 — a growth-orientated index — I can see that it has fallen by 0.8% today, which is quite a bit less than the value-orientated FTSE 100. Interest rates and stock prices So, the FTSE 100 is falling along with other major indexes. But, the slump appears to be affecting cyclical and value stocks the most. The prices of growth stocks are faring better. That suggests to me that it is not fears of rising rates that have knocked the FTSE 100 today. Theoretically, a stock price should equal the value of its future cash flows discounted back to today with an appropriate discount rate. A higher interest rate pushes the discount rate higher. The effect is a lower theoretical stock price. But the impact on growth stocks is more pronounced because their cash flows occur later and are thus discounted more heavily. The opposite is true for value stocks. Think long term The US Federal Reserve released the minutes of its June meeting yesterday. Bond yields fell and their prices increased as investors rushed to buy them, and the US dollar firmed. This is a flight to safety response. Although the Fed did bring forward its projected first US rate rise to 2023, there was squabbling over the state of the US economy and if it is strong enough to stop the quantitative easing programme. What happened in the US yesterday seems to have spread across the world. Investors seem to be looking at the rise of viral variants and the potential for third waves of infection, slowing or even toppling economic growth. They are fleeing stocks (particularly ones sensitive to the economy) and seeking safer harbours. We have seen fears of a booming economy, inflation, and interest rate rises during this recovery already. Today’s concerns are for a slowing economy. But, tomorrow, I would not be surprised if the FTSE 100 rose instead of falling. The best thing I can do is focus on the long term and ignore the day to day noise. So I won’t be buying or selling anything just on the back of today’s price action. The post Why is the FTSE 100 down today? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. Is this little-known company the next ‘Monster’ IPO? Right now, this ‘screaming BUY’ stock is trading at a steep discount from its IPO price, but it looks like the sky is the limit in the years ahead. Because this North American company is the clear leader in its field which is estimated to be worth US$261 BILLION by 2025. The Motley Fool UK analyst team has just published a comprehensive report that shows you exactly why we believe it has so much upside potential. But I warn you, you’ll need to act quickly, given how fast this ‘Monster IPO’ is already moving. Click here to see how you can get a copy of this report for yourself today More reading An absurdly cheap FTSE 250 stock I’d buy now How I’d invest in UK dividend stocks to aim for £100 a month in passive income The FTSE 100 has crashed 150 points today! Here’s why Here’s why I bought Tesco shares After the GSK share price leaps 21% in 4 months, I’m thinking about selling James J. McCombie owns shares in Anglo American. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  34. The British American Tobacco share price slumps! Should I buy the stock? (20/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The British American Tobacco (LSE: BATS) share price and its FTSE 100 peer, Imperial Tobacco (LSE: IMB), have slumped in early deals today. At the time of writing, shares in these two tobacco giants are trading around 6% lower on the day. Over the past 12 months, British American has returned 6.2%, including dividends. Shares in Imperial have returned just under 10%, including income.  It seems to me that the market has been spooked by reports from the US that the new Joe Biden-led administration is planning to restrict nicotine levels in cigarettes.  New restrictions  At this point, neither the White House nor the US Food and Drug Administration, which regulates tobacco, have commented on the report. As such, there’s no guarantee such a restriction will take place, or even if it’s being considered.  Still, this highlights one of the most significant risks tobacco companies face. The possibilities of more regulations and restrictions are just a fact of life for these businesses. Nicotine makes smoking more addictive. Reducing the level of nicotine in cigarettes could have an impact on the overall demand for the product. This would clearly affect sales at Imperial and British American.  But does this justify the recent decline in the British American Tobacco share price? It’s difficult to tell at this stage. However, both of the tobacco giants have faced similar headwinds in the past. So far, they’ve been able to take all of these challenges in their stride. But the number of smokers worldwide is in steady decline, and so is the total volume of cigarettes sold. British American Tobacco share price outlook  Despite these challenges, profits at British American have increased from £4.3bn in 2015 to £6.4bn for 2020. Meanwhile, City analysts believe Imperial will earn £2.3bn in 2021, compared to 2015’s income of £1.7bn.  Considering this performance, I think the sell-off of the British American Tobacco share price has been overdone. Granted, if the US administration introduces nicotine restrictions, demand for cigarettes could decline. But cigarettes sales have been declining for years, and despite these challenges, both Imperial and British American have still grown sales and profits.  These investments may not be suitable for all investors due to the ethical considerations. That’s perfectly understandable. What’s more, I think it’s likely regulators will place more restrictions on these businesses as we advance. Still, I’m encouraged by their past performance. I also think they look attractive as income investments. The British American Tobacco share price currently supports a dividend yield of 7.6%. Imperial yields nearly 9%. Of course, these dividends yields aren’t guaranteed. Both companies may have to cut their distributions if profits come under pressure.  Even after taking these risks and challenges into account, I’d buy both companies for my portfolio today as income investments.  “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading Why Imperial Brands’ share price is too cheap for me to ignore UK shares to buy now: 2 FTSE 100 stocks I own Why I’d pick the FTSE 100’s 2 highest yielding shares The Imperial Brands share price: I’d buy the stock for its 9% yield The Royal Mail share price continues to rise. Here’s why I’m steering clear Rupert Hargreaves owns shares in British American Tobacco. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Imperial Brands. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The British American Tobacco share price slumps! Should I buy the stock? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  35. I think these are 3 of the best stocks to buy now for passive income (19/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    I’m looking to build a passive income to fund my retirement, and I reckon the UK’s FTSE 100 index offers some of the best stocks of all. Despite last year’s dividend cuts, the index should still yield around 3.8% this year, according to AJ Bell. That’s far more than you can hope to get on cash. Dividend income isn’t guaranteed, so I’m targeting the best stocks and safest yields I can find. Here are three of my favourites. Right now, I think the GlaxoSmithKline (LSE: GSK) dividend is hard to beat. That may seem odd, given that the payout has been held at 80p for several years. But, incredibly, this FTSE 100 stalwart now yields 6.55%. That’s the highest I can remember, while its valuation of 10.69 times earnings is the lowest. Three of the best stocks for income The Glaxo share price has performed horribly lately, falling 25% in the last year. It still trades slower than five years ago. The pandemic has hit sales of key shingles vaccine Shingrix, as people avoid seeing the doctor except in emergencies. Glaxo’s drugs pipeline sorely needs replenishing Turning Glaxo around could take time. But you get income while you wait and this remains one of the best dividend stocks on the FTSE 100. I’d buy and hold for the long-term, to give it time to overcome short-term challenges. Mining giant Anglo American (LSE: AAL) has a humdrum yield by comparison. at 3.16%. But that’s partly down to its blistering share price performance. The stock is up 34% over the last year, and 540% over five years. Despite this, it doesn’t look too overvalued, trading at 14.04 times earnings. FTSE 100 dividends for my retirement There’s growing talk of a commodity supercycle, as economies burst out of lockdown and we all enjoy a so-called ‘Roaring Twenties’.  It’s an exciting prospect, although nothing’s baked in. Mutant Covid could slow the recovery. Also, the mining sector is notably volatile. Companies over-extend themselves in the good times, and pay the price in the bad. However, if the economy does roar, I’d expect the Anglo American share price and yield to join in the fun. As both stocks involve a bit of risk, I’m playing relatively safe with my third choice by picking water and waste management company United Utilities Group (LSE: PNN). This stock yields a highly attractive 4.61%. And the dividend should prove pretty stable, given that its earnings are set by its regulatory plan with water regulator Ofwat, which has four more years to run. Trading at 14.56 times earnings, the United Utilities share price looks attractively valued. The pandemic has hit household and commercial water consumption, and could lead to a rise in customer bad debts. But, so far, the damage has been minor. That could change, of course, once government support programmes end. But I still reckon this is one of the best stocks on the FTSE 100 for passive income. These also tempt me. 5 Stocks For Trying To Build Wealth After 50 Markets around the world are reeling from the coronavirus pandemic… And with so many great companies trading at what look to be ‘discount-bin’ prices, now could be the time for savvy investors to snap up some potential bargains. But whether you’re a newbie investor or a seasoned pro, deciding which stocks to add to your shopping list can be daunting prospect during such unprecedented times. Fortunately, The Motley Fool is here to help: our UK Chief Investment Officer and his analyst team have short-listed five companies that they believe STILL boast significant long-term growth prospects despite the global lock-down… You see, here at The Motley Fool we don’t believe “over-trading” is the right path to financial freedom in retirement; instead, we advocate buying and holding (for AT LEAST three to five years) 15 or more quality companies, with shareholder-focused management teams at the helm. That’s why we’re sharing the names of all five of these companies in a special investing report that you can download today for FREE. If you’re 50 or over, we believe these stocks could be a great fit for any well-diversified portfolio, and that you can consider building a position in all five right away. Click here to claim your free copy of this special investing report now! More reading 2 UK dividend stocks I’d add to my portfolio today GSK share price: why I think the world still needs GlaxoSmithKline for Covid-19 The GSK share price has hit a 5-year low! Here’s why I’d buy today Top income stocks for February 2021 GSK vs Unilever: which dividend stock should I buy today? Harvey Jones has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended GlaxoSmithKline. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post I think these are 3 of the best stocks to buy now for passive income appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  36. Infographic: American Airlines (AAL) posts Q1 2021 earnings today (22/04/2021 - AlphaStreet)
    Aviation company American Airlines Group Inc. (NASDAQ: AAL) reported its first-quarter 2021 earnings before regular market hours. The revenue for the first quarter 2021 were down by 39% at $ 4billion year on year. The company had a net loss of $1.3 billion, or $1.97 per share, compared to a previous loss of $2.2 billion or $5.26 per share year on year. “Story will be updated soon”The post Infographic: American Airlines (AAL) posts Q1 2021 earnings today first appeared on AlphaStreet.
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  37. Here are 2 of my FTSE best stocks to buy now (18/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Two picks from my FTSE best stocks to buy now list are Anglo Asian Mining (LSE:AAZ) and Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust (LSE:SMT). Best stocks to buy now pick #1 AAZ is a gold, copper, and silver miner in Azerbaijan. Since the market crash, gold has enjoyed strong performance. Back in 2016, shares in Anglo Asian Mining were trading for 4p per share. As I write, shares are trading for 145p per share, which is a 3,500% increase. The share price has risen over 80% since the March 2020 market crash low of 77p. The miner has regained control of a contract in a politically disputed mineral-rich region. This contract could boost performance nicely. AAZ has seen year-on-year growth in the last three years in terms of revenue, profit and cash reserves. Last month’s announcement of full-year results showed record revenues and cash generation, which in turn cleared all of AAZ’s debt. This is a positive development for Anglo Asian Mining. Many FTSE firms have cut dividends due to the economic crisis. AAZ announced a special dividend at the end of January 2021 and paid a special dividend back in November 2020 too.  FTSE 100 pick One pick from the FTSE 100 section of my best stocks to buy now list is Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust. SMT is a publicly traded investment trust which operates globally. It looks for strong businesses with above-average returns across all sectors. SMT is on my best stocks to buy list for a few reasons. Firstly, it had an impressive 2020. The FTSE 100 firm’s share price rose over 100% in the past 12 months and is trading for close to 1350p per share as I write. It’s share price has risen close to 300% over the past four years too. Next, SMT is run by experienced investment duo James Anderson and Tom Slater. Investors are paying for the valuable experience these two  bring to the table. SMT’s performance over a long period  has been positive and is a testament to the team running it. Success over a period of time shows good flexibility and the ability to operate in different market conditions in my opinion. Finally, SMT has an emphasis on technology stocks within its portfolio, which I like. Almost 10% of SMT’s portfolio is made up of Tesla, which is also on my best stocks to buy now list. Other tech stocks in its portfolio include Amazon and Netflix. Risk and reward SMT’s share price is at an all-time high and may not rise further as market conditions normalise after the crash. Furthermore, a lot of its stocks are considered to be in a ‘bubble.’ This means activity and performance can fluctuate upward in the short-term but stagnate over the longer term. Warren Buffett has stayed away from speculative assets such as gold. This is because these assets don’t provide their own cash flow. AAZ is also quite a small player in a large pond. Furthermore, it also operates in a volatile part of the world whereby politics can affect its operations and hinder progress. I understand these risk, but these two stocks are still on my best stocks to buy now list. Here is another FTSE 100 stock that I like. FREE REPORT: Why this £5 stock could be set to surge Are you on the lookout for UK growth stocks? If so, get this FREE no-strings report now. While it’s available: you’ll discover what we think is a top growth stock for the decade ahead. And the performance of this company really is stunning. In 2019, it returned £150million to shareholders through buybacks and dividends. We believe its financial position is about as solid as anything we’ve seen. Since 2016, annual revenues increased 31% In March 2020, one of its senior directors LOADED UP on 25,000 shares – a position worth £90,259 Operating cash flow is up 47%. (Even its operating margins are rising every year!) Quite simply, we believe it’s a fantastic Foolish growth pick. What’s more, it deserves your attention today. So please don’t wait another moment. Get the full details on this £5 stock now – while your report is free. More reading Scottish Mortgage shares: 5 reasons why I’d buy Scottish Mortgage just sold Tesla stock. Here’s my view on the trust now Hargreaves Lansdown investors are buying Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust. Should I? The Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust share price is up 117% in the last 12 months – can it keep rising? The Scottish Mortgage share price doubled in 2020: should I buy now? Jabran Khan has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Here are 2 of my FTSE best stocks to buy now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  38. TaxWatch: American households will finally get their Child Tax Credit boost — here’s when that first payment will arrive (17/05/2021 - Market Watch)
    The payments will reach households raising more than 65 million children, according to senior administration officials.
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  39. Question about American stocks traded on foreign markets (01/06/2021 - Reddit Stocks)
    Yesterday NYSE was closed, and a favorite stock of mine had a good day in other markets. I was up late last night and watched it climb in the Frankfurt SE, which caused nice little jump at 4am in NYSE premarket. I'm wondering how to find price action in international markets on American stocks while extended hours is closed, 8am-4am ET. I'm using Fidelity and Webull. With Webull it appears I can buy in Chinese markets, but I'm also curious about finding live price activity of American stocks in India and Europe. Any suggestions? This makes me wonder how many people get up early enough to scan international markets prior to 4am for making premarket plays. Any thoughts?   submitted by   /u/pscp [link]   [comments]
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  40. What is working from home tax relief? (21/07/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    You may have heard about working from home tax relief. But what is it? Are you eligible? And if so, how do you claim for it? Here’s what you need to know. Working from home tax relief: what is it? If your job requires you to work from home, HMRC allows you to claim tax relief for extra expenses you have incurred, such as higher energy bills.  Working from home tax relief is not a new scheme. The pandemic has forced many people to work from home, and as a result, millions can now claim it. You don’t have to have been told by your employer to work from home to be eligible. If you’re told to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace, or the NHS app pings you a notice to isolate, then these are perfectly valid reasons to work from home. How much tax relief can I claim? To speed up the process of dealing with many thousands of claims over the past two years, HMRC says that anyone who has been required to work from home for at least one day can claim £6 a week for the whole tax year, as long as you have incurred extra costs (though you won’t need to show evidence). This is true for the 2020/21 and 2021/22 tax years. If you feel your extra costs were greater than £6 per week, you’ll have to provide proof. You’ll also have to provide receipts if you wish to claim tax relief on any equipment you’ve purchased for home working, such as laptops or chairs. For more on this point, see our article on claiming tax relief on coronavirus working from home expenses.  How can I claim working from home tax relief? If you’re an employee, you can get working from home tax relief in two ways.  1. Via the gov.uk website Due to Covid-19, HMRC launched a special microsite to deal with the thousands of claims. To use the service, you must have (or sign-up for) a Government Gateway ID. 2. Via your employer As an alternative to making a claim yourself, your employer may choose to pay you the tax relief instead. However, they are under no obligation to do so, so you may have to apply directly to HMRC. Once you’ve made a claim, HMRC will amend your tax code accordingly. Can the self-employed claim? If you’re self-employed and have been required to work from home for at least one day, you can also claim for the whole 2020/21 and 2021/22 tax years. However you can’t do this using the gov.uk microsite. Instead, you must claim as part of your self-assessment tax return. Like employees, you can claim for the past four tax years, though for 2018/2019 and 2019/20, you can only claim for days you were required to work from home, where you faced higher expenses and not for the whole tax year.  If you work at home for more than 25 hours a week, you may be able to use HMRC’s simplified expenses system to calculate all tax relief you may be eligible for.  What is £6 worth after tax? The £6 benefit is greater for those who pay the highest rates of income tax. For example, if you pay the 20% basic rate of tax and claim £6 a week, the relief will be worth £1.20 per week, or £62.40 per year. Higher-rate taxpayers (40%) will be £2.40 a week better off, or £124.80 a year. Additional-rate taxpayers (45%) will benefit to the tune of £2.70 per week or £140.40 a year. While £6 seems like an arbitrary figure, it’s likely that HMRC has settled on this figure due to the costs required to assess individual claims as a result of millions of people having to work from home due to Covid-19. This is also the likely reason behind HMRC’s generosity allowing anyone to claim for a whole tax year, regardless of the number of days actually worked from home. Working from home tax relief: What else should I know? 1. It may be a bigger saving than you might think While £6 a week may not seem like much, over the past two tax years, your entitlement could be worth up to £280. Plus, if you use HMRC’s microsite, making a claim shouldn’t take more than a few minutes. 2. Couples in the same household can both claim working from home tax relief If you live with your partner in the same household, don’t think you can’t both make a claim, even if you share utilities. Working from home tax relief is an individual benefit. 3. Part-time workers can claim too If you work part-time, you can claim the relief just like full-time workers. 4. If you claimed for the 2020/21 tax year, you must apply again If you put in a claim for working from home tax relief for the 2020/21 tax year, you must make another claim if you want relief for the current tax year.  If you didn’t claim on the last tax year, you can claim for both years (2020/21, 2021/22) this year. The post What is working from home tax relief? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading The Anglo American share price is soaring. Should I finally buy? The Next share price is up 8% today! What’s going on? Is now the right time to buy easyJet shares? Fineco traders have been selling Apple stock The FTSE 100 is rising again, but is the market about to crash?
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  41. The Barclays share price is rising in February. Should I finally buy for my ISA? (22/02/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Barclays (LSE: BARC) shares dipped a little on results day last Thursday, which often happens if the figures don’t quite match up to hopes. But the Barclays share price has since bounced back. The bank has been near the top of my Stocks & Shares ISA candidates list for years. Should I finally buy?  These short-term ups and downs don’t mean much to long-term investors. And though Barclays shares have gained 68% since September, we’re still looking at a 15% drop over the past 12 months. That’s worse than the 10.5% FTSE 100 fall over the same period. So why the relative underperformance? For me, part of the reason ties in with what I see as the biggest risk right now. And it might be the cause of the market’s hesitation over the results. I’m talking of bad debts, and the banking sector is awash with them. As a result of the pandemic, Barclays has recorded impairment charges of £4.8bn. I wasn’t expecting a figure that big. And I’m not surprised the Barclays share price took a minor hit after investors saw it. The impairment trend does appear to be improving though, with the fourth quarter’s charge coming in 19% below Q3. And there was one significant piece of encouraging news — Barclays announced a full-year dividend. It’s only 1p per share, and it wasn’t unexpected. But it’s a start. Banking sector weakness We remember how well the banking sector performed after dividends were reintroduced after the financial crash, don’t we? Oh, hang on, it didn’t do very well at all. No, the Barclays share price has fallen 9.5% over the past five years. And it’s down 48% over 10 years. For me, when deciding whether to add Barclays shares to my investment portfolio, what matters is the bank’s long-term prospects. That’s post-Brexit Britain, something that the Covid-19 pandemic has pushed to the back of my mind from time to time. And I have to remind myself that the future of UK banking still looks very uncertain. From an investment perspective, I don’t worry too much about the economy in 2021. I’m more interested in how things will look in 2026, and in 2031 and beyond. The way some people talk, we could be forgiven for assuming we’ll bounce right back to 2019 levels of relative prosperity the moment we’ve all had our vaccinations. But I’m not that optimistic, and foresee a few tough years ahead. Barclays share price valuation Taking into account my cautious economic outlook, how does the Barclays share price look? I can’t help seeing a lot of pessimism still built into it, and I think it could actually be good value. Analysts are forecasting double-digit earnings growth for the current year. And Barclays’ price-to-tangible-asset-value is only around 0.5 — which looks cheap. At the current Barclays share price, I find myself torn. But I think I’ll keep away for two key reasons. One is that I already own banking shares in Lloyds Banking Group, which is probably enough sector exposure. The other is that I think there are better buys out there, facing less uncertainty. And being over 60, I prefer less risk these days. One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading 2 of the best shares to buy now Barclays restores dividends, but I reckon these are 2 of the best stocks to buy now At over 150p, here’s what I’m doing about Barclays shares Is the Barclays share price too cheap after recent falls? ISA investing: why I think the cheap Barclays share price could be an investment trap! Alan Oscroft owns shares of Lloyds Banking Group. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Barclays and Lloyds Banking Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Barclays share price is rising in February. Should I finally buy for my ISA? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  42. Why is the Cineworld share price falling? (13/07/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    The Cineworld (LSE: CINE) share price has dropped 20% in the past month. Its fall is an even more spectacular 75% compared to the one-year highs it saw just a few months ago in March.  Since cinemas have reopened in both the US and the UK, where Cineworld operates, this is a curious development. I could understand investor nervousness when there was no end in sight for the pandemic. But now that we are increasingly out and about and there has been no material update from the company itself since May, the sharp fall in its share price looks like a contradiction.  Stock rotation in action I do believe, however, that there are reasons to be found when we look at the bigger picture. The trend of falling share prices is visible across stocks. Consider the Lloyds Bank share price, which touched a one-year high in early June, and has fallen since. Or the FTSE 250 airline easyJet share price that was at its highest levels in a year in May, and has fallen 19% since.  It would be tempting to think that this is only the case with reopening, or soon to reopen, stocks, but that is not the case either. FTSE 100 mining biggies like Anglo American and Rio Tinto show a similar pattern in the past few months. And the outlook for metals has been bullish for the past year now.  This backdrop indicates that investors are probably selling off stocks that rallied in the past few months. And that there is a stock market rotation back to those that have struggled in the recent past, a reversal from the trend seen in November last year. As examples consider the AstraZeneca share that languished for months before it started rising again in March and continues to do so. A similar story is visible for the FTSE 100 utility Severn Trent. Persistent pandemic I also believe that some persisting uncertainty about the pandemic could be weighing on investor sentiment. Sure, we have come a long way. But there is still a possibility that we could go back to some restrictions even now. And who knows how that will impact already vulnerable stocks like Cineworld.  What’s next for the Cineworld share price I reckon though, that the Cineworld share price can rally from its current abysmal levels again. In fact, I am enough of a believer in the stock to have bought it and now I will buy more of it at a lower price. Here is why.  First, the nature of stock rotation is such that it comes back to beaten down shares over time. The same can happen in this case. Next, the cinema chain’s results are due next month, which should show some improvement over the past year. Of course it goes without saying that weakness will still be visible, as a legacy of the pandemic, but I reckon it can indicate hope for the future. That can build confidence back up in the stock.  I maintain that it is a buy for me.  The post Why is the Cineworld share price falling? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner. But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared. What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations. And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! More reading Cineworld’s share price slumps to 5-month lows! Is now the time to buy? Move aside AMC, Cineworld shares could be the next meme stock Forget the Cineworld share price! I’d rather buy other UK shares in July Should I buy Cineworld shares at 82p? 2 penny stocks to buy in July Manika Premsingh owns shares of AstraZeneca, Cineworld, and easyJet. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Lloyds Banking Group. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.
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  43. American Express reports mixed results in Q1 (23/04/2021 - AlphaStreet)
    American Express (NYSE: AXP) reported first-quarter 2021 financial results before the regular market hours on Friday. The payment services firm reported Q1 revenue of $9.06 billion, down 12% year-over-year and slightly below the Wall Street projection. Meanwhile, net income of $2.74 per share was well above the target that analysts had anticipated. AXP shares fell 0.7% immediately following the announcement. The stock has gained 72% in the trailing 12 months. (The story will be updated with an AlphaGraphic shortly) Looking forward to listening to management / analyst comments on the results? Stay tuned here for American Express Q1 earnings call transcript Prior performance The post American Express reports mixed results in Q1 first appeared on AlphaStreet.
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  44. The Unilever share price is down 13% in 6 months. I’d buy now (26/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    It’s been a pretty positive six months for the FTSE 100. As I write, the index hovers around 6,927.10 points, up almost a fifth (19.6%) since late October. The Footsie’s gains over this half-year came thanks to news in early November of highly effective Covid-19 vaccines. These reports lit a fire under markets, sending global stock prices soaring. But not all FTSE 100 firms have seen their share prices leap since Halloween. For example, the Unilever (LSE: UVLR) share price has been a laggard and a loser. The Unilever share price slides The Unilever share price actually peaked more than a year and a half ago. On 3 September 2019, the shares hit an all-time closing high of 5,324p. They then declined for months, closing 2019 at 4,350.5p. But there was much worse to come. During March 2020’s Covid-19-inspired market crash, the Unilever share price slumped again. On 16 March 2020, ULVR shares hit their 2020 closing low of 3,726p. This was almost £16 below their September 2019 high. That’s a collapse of three-tenths (30%) in 18 months. Yikes. However, as Covid-19 infections slowed during last summer, the Unilever share price recovered. It rose to close at 4,892p on 14 October, rebounding by almost a third (31.3%) from its March meltdown. So far, so good. ULVR shares disappoint in 2021 Alas, so far this year, the Unilever share price has been limping along. In 2021, it has ranged from a closing high of 4,467p on 6 January to a 2021 closing low of 3,733p on 26 February. As I write (late on Friday), the shares trade around 4,090p. That’s about £8 below their October peak. Yet this still values this Footsie heavyweight at around £108bn, making it one of the largest European companies. Unilever is top of my watchlist The decline of the Unilever share price brings to mind a quote from value investor Ben Graham. He said, “A stock is not just a ticker symbol or an electronic blip; it is an ownership interest in an actual business, with an underlying value that does not depend on its share price”. When I look at Unilever today, I see plenty to like. Unilever is a global Goliath in sales of fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG). It owns hundreds of household-name brands. Globally, 2.5bn people use Unilever products every day. That’s almost one in three people on the planet. It’s also run by an experienced and competent Anglo-Dutch management team. For the record, ULVR stock isn’t exactly cheap, even after declining. With the Unilever share price at 4,090p, it trades on a price-to-earnings ratio of 22.5 and an earnings yield of 4.4%. The dividend yield is 3.6% a year, higher than that of the wider FTSE 100. Indeed, Unilever’s steady quarterly dividends are the mainstay of many an income portfolio worldwide. But this is a class act — and class doesn’t come cheap. Unilever has been a short-term loser, but I see it as a long-term winner. That’s why it’s top of my buy list today. Then again, what if I’m wrong? I see two main impediments to a higher Unilever share price. The first is if the group fails to hit its target for sales growth of 3% to 5% for 2021. Unilever sales saw a stay-at-home boost in 2021 that may not last. Second, underlying operating profits fell 5.8% in 2020 to €9.4bn, due to extra costs — and might slip in 2021. Still, on balance, I’d be a buyer at today’s price! One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading 3 British dividend stocks I’d buy for passive income 2 UK penny stocks (and a FTSE 100 share) I’m thinking of buying right now I think these 2 FTSE 100 stocks might be among the best shares to buy today 2 UK dividend stocks I’d buy now for my ISA Why I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 defensive shares today Cliffdarcy has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Unilever. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post The Unilever share price is down 13% in 6 months. I’d buy now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  45. GNPX a Gene Therapy Company (01/04/2021 - Reddit Stock Market)
    GNPX- Keep and eye on this stock as we head into next week. They are finally releasing pre clinical data at the American Associate for Cancer Research "The largest meeting of Cancer researchers in the world". Actual clinical trials will begin in the first half of 2021 according to the shareholder update in February. Based on that info the preclinical results should be good. Outstanding share count 44m https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210201005640/en/Genprex-Issues-Shareholder-Letter-and-Provides-Corporate-Update ​ https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210330005243/en/Genprex-Announces-Preclinical-Data-for-TUSC2-Immunogene-Therapy-in-Non-Small-Cell-Lung-Cancer-to-Be-Featured-in-Two-Presentations-at-the-2021-American-Association-for-Cancer-Research-Annual-Meeting   submitted by   /u/Trick-Stranger753 [link]   [comments]
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  46. Anglo Pacific Resources reports FY results (14/04/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  47. Anglo Pacific Resources declares £0.017 dividend (14/04/2021 - Seeking Alpha)

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  48. Will the Cineworld (CINE) share price rise with soaring seat sales? (24/05/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    With the developed world emerging from pandemic lockdowns, everyday life is set to resume. And one great pleasure of modern life — going to the cinema — is now an option for consumers. So what could happen to the Cineworld (LSE: CINE) share price? The Cineworld share price collapses Cineworld is the globe’s second-largest cinema chain. At the end of last year, it had 9,311 screens across 767 sites in 10 countries, employing 30,000 people. However, when Covid-19 lockdowns arrived in spring 2020, the business was taken almost to the brink. With cinemas shuttered, CINE’s sales cratered. Revenues collapsed from $4.37bn in 2019 to $852m in 2020, crashing by more than four-fifths (80.5%). Such a severe contraction proved disastrous for the Cineworld share price. Two years ago, the Cineworld share price was riding high. On 29 April 2019, CINE shares closed at 321p, close to all-time highs. By the end of 2019, the stock had dropped more than £1 to 219.1p, but the worst was yet to come. During ‘Meltdown March’, the shares closed at a low of 21.38p on 17 March, down more than nine-tenths (90.2%) in 2020. Throughout 2020, there were real fears that the company might not survive multiple enforced shutdowns. Thus, on 5 October, the stock hit a new intra-day low of on 15.11p. Yikes. Cineworld comes back from the dead However, like a zombie in a George Romero horror movie, the Cineworld share price came back from the dead. The shot in the arm was the announcement in early November of several effective Covid-19 vaccines. This breathed new life into the stock. It more than quadrupled from its October trough, ending 2020 at 64.1p. However, as vaccination programmes were rolled out, the shares kept soaring. On 19 March 2021, the Cineworld share price hit an intra-day high of 124.85p, before closing at 122p (2021’s closing high). What a comeback from the March 2020 lows. But CINE shares have been in decline since then. As I write, they trade at 89.69p, down 35.16p — more than a quarter (28.2%) — from their 2021 high. With the share price falling and seat sales resuming, is now the time to buy CINE? I like the stock today As a traditional value investor, I try to stack the odds in my favour by buying into companies with strong cash flows, profits, and cash dividends. Obviously, Cineworld doesn’t currently fit that description. Today, Cineworld has a market value of £1.2bn, but also carries $8.3bn (£5.86bn) of net debt, which is a huge burden. The business lost $3bn in 2020, versus a profit of $212m in 2019. Clearly, getting back to profitability is going to be an uphill struggle for the group. Just a month ago, I passed on buying CINE with the Cineworld share price at 95.66p. But with the shares now trading below 90p, my mind is changing. CINE now has plenty of liquidity and cash at hand to support it until life returns to a new post-Covid-19 norm. Furthermore, the group issued an upbeat trading update today, confirming that 502 (97%) of its US cinemas are now open. It also confirmed receipt of a $203m tax refund from the US government. And UK ticket sales for children’s film Peter Rabbit 2: The Runaway were strong. Finally, there may be light at the end of the tunnel for Cineworld. For this reason, I would buy CINE stock at the current price as a recovery play. One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues Looking for new share ideas? Grab this FREE report now. Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits. From 2015-2019… Revenues increased 38.6%. Its net income went up 19.7 times! Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLED The opportunity here really is astounding. In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer? You could have the full details on this company right now. Grab your free report – while it’s online. More reading Short sellers are pushing the Cineworld share price down! Why now is a great time for me to buy Cineworld shares Will Cineworld shares ever be worth buying? As the UK reopens, is the Cineworld share price a bargain? Why I’m buying this absurdly cheap FTSE 250 stock this month Cliffdarcy has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services, such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool, we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Will the Cineworld (CINE) share price rise with soaring seat sales? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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  49. Will the Rolls-Royce share price recover in the second half of 2021? (23/04/2021 - The Motley Fool UK)
    Shareholders in Rolls-Royce (LSE: RR) have experienced considerable turbulence lately. It’s not all bad: the Rolls-Royce share price is up 21% over the past six months. But over the past year, the shares slid 7% — and that excludes their dramatic loss of altitude last March. Aviation is now showing signs of recovery. So could the share price also recover in the second half of 2021? Demand recovery One of the key factors dragging down the share price has been the reduced number of flying hours for many engines serviced by the company. That translates into reduced revenues and profits for the engineering giant. I previously explained the importance of flying hours to the company’s business model. Initially many commentators were optimistic that mass vaccination would lead to flying hours returning closer to normal in the current half. This is happening in some markets – for example, the US carrier American Airlines announced last week that it expects to fly over 90% of its domestic seat capacity this summer compared to its 2019 levels. Even on its international routes, the American flag carrier forecasts flying 80% of it 2019 capacity. European demand could hamper the Rolls-Royce share price But in Europe, demand recovery is slower and this is a key risk for the share price as it translates to lower profits. I don’t see a chance of a recovery in Europe quite at the American level until the second half of the year. But there are signs that the recovery could come fast when it does happen. Ryanair boss Michael O’Leary has said he expects some families to be taking European holidays from the middle of June, and he forecasts a strong profit recovery for Ryanair next year. That should be positive news for the Rolls-Royce share price. Rolls’ modelling suggests that across this year overall, large engine flying hours will be able to climb back to 70% of 2019 levels. The American example gives more credibility to this estimate in my view. Strong liquidity Rolls-Royce has made strenuous efforts to improve liquidity. In its most recent annual report, liquidity stood at £9.0bn, up from £6.9bn the prior year. So I don’t worry about its liquidity for now. However, some of that liquidity came through a rights issue, which diluted shareholders. There is a risk that if liquidity is weak in future, shareholders could again face similar dilution. Free cash flow positivity Despite its strong liquidity, turning free-cash-flow-positive would still be good news for the company. It would suggest some tangible business recovery. The company could start adding to its cash pile instead of depleting it. The company still expects negative cash flow for 2021 overall. But crucially, it expects to turn free-cash-flow-positive in the second half of 2021. I think increased flying hours make that target look plausible. If the company achieves this, I expect it to be a boost to the Rolls-Royce share price. On that basis, I do think the price could show some recovery and could increase in the second half of 2021 compared to today’s level. Clearly, though, there is a risk that returning to positive free cash flow will be delayed, for example by further lockdowns or a slower return of flying demand than forecast. One stock for a post-Covid world… Covid-19 is ripping the investment world in two… Some companies have seen exploding cash-flows, soaring valuations and record results… …Others are scrimping and suffering. Entire industries look to be going extinct. Such world-changing events may only happen once in a lifetime. And it seems there’s no middle ground. Financially, you’ll want to learn how to get positioned on the winning side. That’s why our expert analysts have put together this special report. If the pandemic has completely changed our lives forever, then they believe that this stock, hidden inside the tech-heavy NASDAQ, could be set for monstrous gains… Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this US stock… free of charge! More reading Why I think I could double my money with the 100p Rolls-Royce share price The Rolls-Royce share price is crashing in April! Should I buy RR today? Does the Rolls-Royce share price make me want to buy in 2021? 2 ways the Rolls-Royce share price could benefit from the reopening economy Is the Rolls-Royce share price undervalued? christopherruane has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The post Will the Rolls-Royce share price recover in the second half of 2021? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.
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